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Rescooped by Sharmaine Nepomuceno from APES: Eutrophication of Lakes
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Eutrophication of lakes cannot be controlled by reducing nitrogen input: Results of a 37-year whole-ecosystem experiment

An expirement was conducted in a lake to see if by deceasing the inputs of nitrogen, the eutrophication would decrease as well. This expirement was conducted in a Expiremental lakes area.  The nitrogen was removed for 37 years. However, despite the lower levels of nitrogen, the eutrophication stayed the same, showing that the eutrophication must be decreased by managing levels of phosporus.


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Scooped by Sharmaine Nepomuceno
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My Scoop on Eutrophication of Lakes

When there is an increase of added nutrients in a lake a process called eutrophication occurs. The nutrients added could be nitrous or phosphorus and though it may seem positive, the results are in fact negative. The eutrophic environment can make it difficult for plants to grow and sustain life. Having the extra nutrients ends in the growth of algea which is harmful to the lake water. Eutrophication can be natural or human-caused. 

Natural nutrients like nitrogen and phosphotus will sometimes pool into the lake from the ground resulting in eutrophication. The discharge of detergants also add to the cause. The quality of the lake water is degraded and the growth of algea increases due to eutrophication. This leads to unhealthy waters which results in plant life not being able to survive. 

Cultural eutrophication, also known as human caused eutrophication, can be caused by many human made things. Many things we do as humans negatively affect the environment. One example of a cultural eutrophication is when cars and factorsies produce nitrogen compounds that come into lakes. Another is when untreated sewage effluent and agricultural run-off causing eutrophication. 

 

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Rescooped by Sharmaine Nepomuceno from Eutrophication of Lakes
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Eutrophication

Eutrophication | The Daily Dirt | Scoop.it
Eutrophication is an increase in nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus that increase algal growth. Depending on the degree of eutrophication, severe environmental effects can develop, which degrade water quality.

 

This article discusses eutrophication, which is when too many nutrients (like nitrogen and phosphorus) are added to a lake and as a result, algae growth increases. Because of human behavior, eutrophication in nature is occurring more rapidly. Unfortunately, eutrophication leads to the anoxia, which is a decrease in available oxygen, so many fish die. To prevent the negative impacts of eutrophication, a focus on high water quality has been put into place through laws.


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Rescooped by Sharmaine Nepomuceno from APES: Eutrophication of Lakes
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Eutrophication

Eutrophication | The Daily Dirt | Scoop.it

The graphic above depicts the process of eutrophication which is the addition of nutrients within lakes, creating a high level of productivity.


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Eutrophication

Eutrophication | The Daily Dirt | Scoop.it

"Eutrophication is a syndrome of ecosystem responses to human activities that fertilize water bodies with nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P), often leading to changes in animal and plant populations and degradation of water and habitat quality."

 

The article describes the cultural and natural eutrophication that occurs in lakes. It's caused mostly by nitrogen and phosphorus nutrients.

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Eutrophication - humans, body, used, water, process, life, plants, chemical, methods, oxygen, plant, change, part

Eutrophication - humans, body, used, water, process, life, plants, chemical, methods, oxygen, plant, change, part | The Daily Dirt | Scoop.it
Diffusion, Digestive System, Dinosaur, Diode, Dioxin, Disease, Distillation, Doppler Effect, Drift Net, Drought, etc…...

 

This article describes how eutrophication in itself is not a bad thing; a eutrophic lake is abundant in plant and animal life with many nutrients.  However, due to human interference, which is referred to as artificial or cultural eutrophication, lakes are suffering. Since the opposite of a thriving lake is the result, eutrophication is now viewed as a negative process.

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The Types of Lakes

The Types of Lakes | The Daily Dirt | Scoop.it

The visual to the left contrasts oligotrophic, mesotrophic, and eutropic lakes.  Starting from the top and moving down, each increasingly has more nutrients.

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