The Curse of Macbeth and witchcraft
372 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by nicolette tomasetti
Scoop.it!

WitchCraft: The Witch Trials

From the 15th till the18th century, Witchcraft became a well-known craze throughout a majority of Europe. Many believed in 'magic' during this time period, but only saw it as a positive effect on their everyday lives. For example, they thought that magic could heal the sick, help hunting, or make crops grow quicker. However, what they did not realize is that magic could be used to wish evil upon someone as well, thinking about this frightened them. This interests me because one minute they loved magic and the next they claimed it a negative and decided it was witchcraft. Everyone, however, took witchcraft very seriously; claiming that if you participated in witchcraft, you had made a promise to the devil. Several people, who did not participate in witchcraft at all were tried and executed over this matter. I do not understand what started this craze, or what caused someone to accuse another of witchcraft, and we will most likely never find out the reasoning behind it.Till this day, no one really knows how or why witchcraft became so common during this time period.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nicolette tomasetti
Scoop.it!

Act 1 Scene 1 of Macbeth - 1971 2006 and 2010

Act 1 Scene 1 of Macbeth - three witches scene from 3 different versions...
more...
Lindsay Pacheco's comment, November 13, 2012 11:21 AM
-Raquel
nicolette tomasetti's comment, November 15, 2012 12:09 PM
This video exopsed different views and portralys of the play which caught my intrest. It also shows how long the play has been around and how it brings about many interpetations. The video propells me to want form my own intreptaion on the play. -Danielle Farrant
nicolette tomasetti's comment, November 15, 2012 12:11 PM
I thought that this video was very benficial because it is a more modern potrayal of Macbeth and the famous scene with the witches. Sometimes the original versions can be difficult to understand but when it is put into a modern setting it is more relatable. The different interpritation of the scene is creative and current. It makes me interested in Macbeth a little more. -Nicole Tollevsen
Scooped by nicolette tomasetti
Scoop.it!

Is It Really A Curse?

Is It Really A Curse? | The Curse of Macbeth and witchcraft | Scoop.it

Why is it that Macbeth is the only play remembered for its misfortunes? There are many factors that contribute to the amount of accidents that are related to this infamous production. During most of the play, the scenes are set for nighttime or in heavy fog which does not allow a bright light source. Along with the fact that the play is filled with fight scenes, these two factors contribute to a multitude of on stage accidents. This play has also been in production for more than 400 years, and having some major accidents in that lengthy period of time is unavoidable. In the production of Spiderman on Broadway, four Spiderman actors were injured including an actor that fell 30 feet and had to be hospitalized. If any play was to be analyzed, there would be incidents of major accidents and misfortunes, but there are no curses on any other plays. Tales of the unlucky instances connected to Macbeth will continue to be told and the superstition will continue to live on, even though every play encounters its own share of problems.

more...
Lindsay Pacheco's comment, November 12, 2012 10:04 PM
I agree with the response to the supposed MacBeth curse. If there are foggy scenes, low light, and a large amount of fight scenes, it's no wonder that there are accidents on stage. I think this curse is just people being overly superstitious and waiting for something to happen just so they can blame it on the "curse." I also like how they related the frequent accidents in MacBeth plays to the accidents that happen in risky plays like Spiderman. -Lindsay Pacheco
Nicole Tollevsen's comment, November 14, 2012 4:56 PM
Kayla troia: I agree with this response and Lindsay's response above. Why isn't Spiderman and other broadway shows cursed if several problems are encountered by the actors during the practices and performances? I understand that Macbeth is over 400 years old....but what happens when Spiderman is eventually that old? Will people look at it as a cursed play and will not be allowed to say "Spiderman" in a theater? However, I like the connection that the article made by tying in these thoughts because like many, these are the thoughts people are thinking. People believe in these superstitions for enjoyment and popularity toward the play. It even scares myself when I hear about the witches and the spells in Macbeth, as we read it in class.
King James I's comment, November 14, 2012 10:37 PM
I think it is just coincidence that there is a supposed "curse." People probably overreacted because the play has to do with witchcraft. With dangerous scenes in basically any movie or play, there is a risk of accidents. I agree with Nicole about her asking why the boradway play "Spiderman" isn't considered cursed. Again, it just seems as though "Macbeth" got more attention for it because there is witchcraft mentioned in it. It was also not a smart idea if people thought it was cursed and they still continued to act out scenes of "Macbeth" with poor lighting, fog, and fight scenes. I do not believe in the curse of Macbeth. -Christina Dunham
Scooped by nicolette tomasetti
Scoop.it!

The Macbeth Curse

With our production of Macbeth fast approaching our minds are turning to murder, witchcraft and of course - curses. October 21-30, 2010 at the Studio Theatre...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nicolette tomasetti
Scoop.it!

Witches and King James :: Life and Times :: Internet Shakespeare Editions

Witches and King James :: Life and Times :: Internet Shakespeare Editions | The Curse of Macbeth and witchcraft | Scoop.it

Witchcraft held a prominent role during much of the fifteenth through seventeenth century’s theatre history. World famous; William Shakespeare was proven to be no stranger to the unnatural premises of Witchcraft when he created “The Tragedy of Macbeth” and included an abundance of supernatural elements into his works. Witchcraft was an opinionated topic that was highly accepted amongst the people of Shakespeare’s time. Based upon popular entertainment production, and more importantly; the interests of King James I, Shakespeare created the infamous play of Macbeth. The witchery exhibited in Macbeth was arguably a reflection of ambition, sorcery, treachery, murder, and revenge. During the creation of Macbeth Shakespeare wanted to please King James I, and was very intuitive as to King James’ interests in Witchcraft. The showing of Macbeth most certainly captured King James’ attention, as well as the rest of the people with Shakespeare’s complementary scenes of the play precisely designated to the King himself. Although no one of Shakespeare’s time dared to create any type of literature based upon the infamous topic of Witchcraft, Shakespeare took the leading role in turning such a terrible act into an astonishing topic and source of entertainment.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nicolette tomasetti
Scoop.it!

The Curse of Macbeth

The Curse of Macbeth | The Curse of Macbeth and witchcraft | Scoop.it

Ever since the first showing of Macbeth, unlucky instances go hand in hand with the play. Mentioning Macbeth backstage is cause for great acts of superstition. Some performers do not allow other actors back into the dressing room after speaking the dreaded “M” word unless they turn around three times, spit, and shout profanity. Even after that, the actor must beg permission to reenter the theater. The play is said to be cursed ever since the first production put on for King James I of Scotland. Shakespeare himself had to step in and play the role of Lady Macbeth after the original actor fell ill and could not perform. In the 1937 production of Macbeth in London, the star of the play lost his voice, the founder of the theater had a heart attack on opening night, and an audience member was hit by a fragment of a sword and died. At the Liverpool Repertory Theater, five actors caught the flu and were replaced with understudies and the actor playing Macbeth was hit in the eye with a sword. During another production of Macbeth, the actors playing the Third Witch and King Duncan died during the final rehearsal while another witch died while onstage. To further prove the superstition, the set designer of that Macbeth production committed suicide. The list of misfortunes surrounding Macbeth continues on, and to this day, actors are still superstitious of the “M” word while in theater.         

more...
Lindsay Pacheco's comment, November 12, 2012 6:21 PM
This scoop was interesting and very informative, it gave great insight on the history of Macbeth and the plays performed by various actors and theater performers. The controversy swarmed around Macbeth and the "M" word definitely arises questionable superstition.
Lindsay Pacheco's comment, November 12, 2012 6:23 PM
-Tara Genovese