The Cosmos
147 views | +0 today
Follow
The Cosmos
The Final Frontier
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Christopher Baggett
Scoop.it!

How to Shoot the Milky Way…On Easter Island

How to Shoot the Milky Way…On Easter Island | The Cosmos | Scoop.it

Before I took off on Nat Geo's Around the World by Private Jet expedition, my good friends at Intelligent Travel asked a favor: Would I, an amateur photographer, test Jim Richardson’s can’t-miss formula for shooting the Milky Way?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Christopher Baggett
Scoop.it!

Colonizing Mars By 2023 | Articles | Manufacturing.net

Colonizing Mars By 2023 | Articles | Manufacturing.net | The Cosmos | Scoop.it
Mars One plans to colonize the place by 2023. The fifteen year-old dream project of CEO Bas Lansdorp is in the process of organizing a series of missions to the red planet.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Christopher Baggett
Scoop.it!

Sky watchers have good weekend to catch falling stars

A big meteor shower this weekend could produce as many as 60 falling stars an hour as the Earth passes through the trail of Halley's comet.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Christopher Baggett
Scoop.it!

Curiosity Rover Finds More Strange, Bright Objects in Martian Soil | Wired Science | Wired.com

Curiosity Rover Finds More Strange, Bright Objects in Martian Soil | Wired Science | Wired.com | The Cosmos | Scoop.it
NASA’s Curiosity rover took three scoops from a small Martian sand dune and found several bright particles in the soil.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Christopher Baggett
Scoop.it!

Tatooine Times Two: Amateur Astronomers Find Planet in Four-Star System | Wired Science | Wired.com

Tatooine Times Two: Amateur Astronomers Find Planet in Four-Star System | Wired Science | Wired.com | The Cosmos | Scoop.it
A group of volunteers at a citizen science astronomy website have discovered a extrasolar planet orbiting a record four stars.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Christopher Baggett
Scoop.it!

Daredevil Makes Record-Breaking Supersonic Jump: Scientific American

Daredevil Makes Record-Breaking Supersonic Jump: Scientific American | The Cosmos | Scoop.it
Felix Baumgartner broke the mark for highest-ever skydive after leaping from a balloon more than 24 miles above Earth's surface on October 14...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Christopher Baggett from Social Mercor
Scoop.it!

Skydiver Hopes to Break Sound Barrier Today - weather.com

Skydiver Hopes to Break Sound Barrier Today  - weather.com | The Cosmos | Scoop.it
Extreme athlete Felix Baumgartner plans to try again today to jump from the edge of space.

Via FreeCDLJobs.com, Mercor
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Christopher Baggett
Scoop.it!

Spaceflight HD: Gigapan of Space Shuttle Discovery's Flight Deck - National Geographic

Spaceflight HD: Gigapan of Space Shuttle Discovery's Flight Deck - National Geographic | The Cosmos | Scoop.it
Spaceflight HD: Gigapan of Space Shuttle Discovery's Flight Deck - National Geographic...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Christopher Baggett
Scoop.it!

“Once in a Civilization” Comet to Zip past Earth Next Year | Observations, Scientific American Blog Network

“Once in a Civilization” Comet to Zip past Earth Next Year | Observations, Scientific American Blog Network | The Cosmos | Scoop.it
As it flares out of the distant Oort Cloud, the newly discovered comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) appears to be heading on a trajectory that could make ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Christopher Baggett
Scoop.it!

Diamond planet puts Russia’s secret diamond field to shame | The Bell Jar

Diamond planet puts Russia’s secret diamond field to shame | The Bell Jar | The Cosmos | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Christopher Baggett
Scoop.it!

Dragon cargo ship captured, berthed to space station

Dragon cargo ship captured, berthed to space station | The Cosmos | Scoop.it
After a flawless final rendezvous, a commercial SpaceX cargo ship is captured by the International Space Station's robot arm and attached to a docking port for unloading. Read this article by William Harwood on CNET News.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Christopher Baggett
Scoop.it!

SpaceX Confirms Falcon 9 Engine 'Anomaly' During ISS Launch

SpaceX Confirms Falcon 9 Engine 'Anomaly' During ISS Launch | The Cosmos | Scoop.it
Merlin engine shuts down during first stage of an otherwise successful launch of company's Dragon capsule on its first official resupply mission to the International Space Station.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Christopher Baggett from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Separated after birth

Separated after birth | The Cosmos | Scoop.it

Scientists have long believed that Earth itself emerged from a series of giant impacts. These impacts would have made the early Earth spin near its stability limit of about two hours per revolution. The last giant impact, they believe, formed a moon that is a twin of the Earth.

 

When the giant impact occurred between Theia and the fast-spinning Earth, the high speed of the Earth’s spin caused the ejection of material from Earth into orbit. They believe that the ejected material formed a moon with chemical composition similar to Earth. After the impact, the rapidly rotating Earth was slowed down by the gravitational interaction between the sun and the moon.


The previous giant-impact models held that a small planet, Theia, hit the Earth, sending a cloud of debris from Theia into orbit that formed the moon. But the chemistry of the moon matches that of the Earth. Now, Sarah T. Stewart, a professor in Harvard’s Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, and her SETI colleague Matija Ćuk propose a new model in which pieces of the Earth broke off and formed the moon.


The researchers present a dynamic model of their theory, based on the results of chemical analyses of isotopes from the Earth and moon, in a paper published online today in the journal Science. The results are also being presented this week at the 44th meeting of the American Astronomical Society (AAS) Division for Planetary Sciences in Reno, Nev.


Additionally, Stewart and Ćuk propose that prior to the collision and creation of the moon, the Earth was spinning much faster than it does now, and had a day that was only two to three hours long.
Many scientists believe that Earth itself emerged from a series of giant impacts. These impacts would have made the early Earth spin near its stability limit of about two hours per revolution. The last giant impact, they believe, formed a moon that is a twin of the Earth. 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Christopher Baggett from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Life in Space: Genome Hunters Go After Martian DNA To Find Extraterrestrial Life (using Deep Sequencing Methods)

Life in Space: Genome Hunters Go After Martian DNA To Find Extraterrestrial Life (using Deep Sequencing Methods) | The Cosmos | Scoop.it
J. Craig Venter may have just started a race to discover alien life on the Red Planet.

 

Two high-profile entrepreneurs say they want to put a DNA sequencing machine on the surface of Mars in a bid to prove the existence of extraterrestrial life. In what could become a race for the first extraterrestrial genome, researcher J. Craig Venter said Tuesday that his Maryland academic institute and his company, Synthetic Genomics, would develop a machine capable of sequencing and beaming back DNA data from the planet.

 

Separately, Jonathan Rothberg, founder of Ion Torrent, a DNA sequencing company, is collaborating on an effort to equip his company's "Personal Genome Machine" for a similar task. "We want to make sure an Ion Torrent goes to Mars," Rothberg said.

 

Although neither team yet has a berth on Mars rocket, their plans reflect the belief that the simplest way to prove there is life on Mars is to send a DNA sequencing machine. "There will be DNA life forms there," Venter predicted, "you just need the right tools to look for them". Venter said researchers working with him have already begun tests at a Mars-like site in the Mojave Desert. Their goal, he said, is to demonstrate a machine capable of autonomously isolating microbes from soil, sequencing their DNA, and then transmitting the information to a remote computer, as would be required on an unmanned Mars mission.

 

Meanwhile, Rothberg's Personal Genome Machine is being adapted for Martian conditions as part of a NASA-funded project at Harvard and MIT called SET-G, or "the search for extraterrestrial genomes." Christopher Carr, an MIT research scientist involved in the effort, says his lab is working to shrink Ion Torrent's machine from 30 kilograms down to just three kilograms so that it can fit on a NASA rover. Other tests, already conducted, have determined how well the device can withstand the heavy radiation it would encounter on the way to Mars.

 

NASA, whose Curiosity rover landed on Mars in August, won't send another rover mission to the planet before at least 2018 (see "The Mars Rover Curiosity Marks a Technological Triumph"), and there's no guarantee a DNA sequencing device would go aboard. "The hard thing about getting to Mars is hitting the NASA specifications," says George Church, a Harvard University researcher and a senior member of the SET-G team. "Venter isn't ahead of anyone else."

 

"The reason to take a device all the way to Mars and not bring back the sample is because of contamination. No one would believe you," says Tessi Kanavarioti, a chemist who carried out early theoretical work on Martian biology and was involved in studying rocks brought back from the moon in the 1970s. Sequencing machines are so sensitive that if a single Earth germ landed on the sample returned from Mars, it might ruin the experiment.

 

Discovering and sequencing extraterrestrial life would be an immense scientific prize. Sequencing could reveal whether life evolved in similar ways on both Earth and Mars or, perhaps, moved between the planets. During a series of massive space collisions around four billion years ago, the two bodies exchanged about a billion tons of rocks and debris. So far, NASA researchers have searched Mars for traces of water—a prerequisite for life as we know it—as well as indirect signs that life might have existed there many eons ago. Since DNA molecules don't survive more than a million years, even on Earth, anyone sending a DNA sequencer to Mars has to believe that living microorganisms will be found there now. Sending a DNA sequencer to Mars would be a "high-risk, high-payoff" experiment. It might very well find nothing, but if DNA were discovered, that would provide nearly irrefutable proof of extraterrestrial life.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Christopher Baggett
Scoop.it!

Ultra-Detailed Look At Uranus Reveals Mysterious Weather Patterns | Wired Science | Wired.com

Ultra-Detailed Look At Uranus Reveals Mysterious Weather Patterns | Wired Science | Wired.com | The Cosmos | Scoop.it
Astronomers have created the most detailed, high-resolution images of Uranus ever taken, showing off its complex weather patterns and several features that scientists don’t completely understand.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Christopher Baggett
Scoop.it!

Water on the moon? Maybe a lot more than we thought ... thanks to the sun.

Water on the moon? Maybe a lot more than we thought ... thanks to the sun. | The Cosmos | Scoop.it
A new study finds 'an unanticipated, abundant reservoir' of water on the moon, molecules formed on the surfaces of oxygen-bearing rocks bombarded by protons from the solar wind.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Christopher Baggett
Scoop.it!

Felix baumgartner News, Videos, Reviews and Gossip - Gizmodo

Felix baumgartner News, Videos, Reviews and Gossip - Gizmodo | The Cosmos | Scoop.it
First Head Cam Video of Supersonic Space Jump. What Would It Take For You To Go Sky-Diving From the Stratosphere?. Supersonic Space Jump: Full Coverage.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Christopher Baggett
Scoop.it!

11 Cool Tools NASA Curiosity Brought To Mars

11 Cool Tools NASA Curiosity Brought To Mars | The Cosmos | Scoop.it
NASA's Curiosity Mars rover has a toolbox to make any gadget-lover jealous. Check out our drill-down on the instruments helping determine whether microbial life ever existed on the red planet.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Christopher Baggett
Scoop.it!

Objects may be larger than they appear... Endeavour's last journey

Objects may be larger than they appear... Endeavour's last journey | The Cosmos | Scoop.it
Hundreds of people gathered on the streets of Los Angeles this weekend, as the retired space shuttle Endeavour embarked on its final journey, a 12-mile trip ending at the California Science Centre, its new permanent home.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Christopher Baggett
Scoop.it!

NASA - NASA's Ironman-Like Exoskeleton Could Give Astronauts, Paraplegics Improved Mobility and Strength

NASA - NASA's Ironman-Like Exoskeleton Could Give Astronauts, Paraplegics Improved Mobility and Strength | The Cosmos | Scoop.it
Spinoff may help astronauts stay healthier in space with the added benefit of assisting paraplegics in walking here on Earth.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Christopher Baggett
Scoop.it!

Wired Science Space Photo of the Day | Wired Science | Wired.com

Wired Science Space Photo of the Day | Wired Science | Wired.com | The Cosmos | Scoop.it
Every day, Wired Science selects a new awesome space photo for our collection. Check out the mind-blowing views of galaxies, planets and stars.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Christopher Baggett
Scoop.it!

Mars meteorite may contain bubbles of 700,000-year-old Martian air

Mars meteorite may contain bubbles of 700,000-year-old Martian air | The Cosmos | Scoop.it
Gas trapped in meteorite could help scientists reconstruct conditions on Mars when the rock was blasted into space...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Christopher Baggett
Scoop.it!

Incredible Cosmic Spiral Helps Unravel Details of Stellar Evolution | Wired Science | Wired.com

Incredible Cosmic Spiral Helps Unravel Details of Stellar Evolution | Wired Science | Wired.com | The Cosmos | Scoop.it
Astronomers have spotted a strange spiral of gas and dust winding outward from a giant red star named R Sculptoris.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Christopher Baggett
Scoop.it!

Baumgartner gives supersonic skydive a go (live video)

Baumgartner gives supersonic skydive a go (live video) | The Cosmos | Scoop.it
The daredevil parachutist wants to be the first person ever to hit Mach 1 in a freefall. To do that, he'll be jumping today from a balloon gondola 23 miles above the surface of the Earth. Read this article by Jonathan Skillings on CNET News.
more...
No comment yet.