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China leads the world in decarbonization - Chinadaily.com.cn

China leads the world in decarbonization - Chinadaily.com.cn | The Chemical Industry by 2050 | Scoop.it
China registered a higher rate of decarbonization than any of the world's major economies for the second year running, according to a new report published by London-based consultancy PricewaterhouseCoopers (known as PwC).

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IBM Releases Pretrained Watson AI Tools in Several Industries | News & Opinion | PCMag.com

IBM Releases Pretrained Watson AI Tools in Several Industries | News & Opinion | PCMag.com | The Chemical Industry by 2050 | Scoop.it
IBM has introduced a number of targeted Watson AI applications to allow workers in industries such as agriculture, manufacturing, and transportation to gain key insights.
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Eight technologies that are changing IoT – and how they can benefit you

Eight technologies that are changing IoT – and how they can benefit you | The Chemical Industry by 2050 | Scoop.it
IoT certainly continues to be full of the buzzword hype - but here are eight cutting edge technologies that will really change the way businesses and consumers alike interact.

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A new brain-inspired architecture could improve how computers handle data and advance AI

A new brain-inspired architecture could improve how computers handle data and advance AI | The Chemical Industry by 2050 | Scoop.it
IBM researchers are developing a new computer architecture, better equipped to handle increased data loads from artificial intelligence. Their designs draw on concepts from the human brain and significantly outperform conventional computers in comparative studies. They report on their recent findings in the Journal of Applied Physics.

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John Lasschuit ®™'s curator insight, October 5, 4:17 AM

Forget Von Neumann principles and switch to phase-change memory.

Doug Stewart's curator insight, October 5, 1:57 PM
IBM researchers are developing a new computer architecture, better equipped to handle increased data loads from artificial intelligence.
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Carrefour Adopts Blockchain To Track Fresh Produce

Carrefour Adopts Blockchain To Track Fresh Produce | The Chemical Industry by 2050 | Scoop.it

Carrefour said that it has adopted blockchain ledger technology to track and trace chicken, eggs and tomatoes as they travel from farms to stores, and will deploy it across all of its fresh product lines in coming years.


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Why machine learning will see explosive growth over the next 2 years

Why machine learning will see explosive growth over the next 2 years | The Chemical Industry by 2050 | Scoop.it
While current production of machine learning projects are low, 96% of companies expect them to increase in the next couple years.

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Going up! Japan to test mini 'space elevator'

Going up! Japan to test mini 'space elevator' | The Chemical Industry by 2050 | Scoop.it
A Japanese team working to develop a "space elevator" will conduct a first trial this month, blasting off a miniature version on satellites to test the technology.

 

 

The test equipment, produced by researchers at Shizuoka University, will hitch a ride on an H-2B rocket being launched by Japan's space agency from southern island of Tanegashima next week. The test involves a miniature elevator stand-in—a box just six centimeters (2.4 inches) long, three centimeters wide, and three centimeters high. If all goes well, it will provide proof of concept by moving along a 10-meter cable suspended in space between two mini satellites that will keep it taut.bThe mini-elevator will travel along the cable from a container in one of the satellites.

 

"It's going to be the world's first experiment to test elevator movement in space," a university spokesman told AFP on Tuesday. The movement of the motorized "elevator" box will be monitored with cameras in the satellites. It is still a far cry from the ultimate beam-me-up goals of the project, which builds on a long history of "space elevator" dreams.

 

The idea was first proposed in 1895 by Russian scientist Konstantin Tsiolkovsky after he saw the Eiffel Tower in Paris, and was revisited nearly a century later in a novel by Arthur C. Clarke. But technical barriers have always kept plans stuck at the conceptual stage. Japanese construction firm Obayashi, which is collaborating with the Shizuoka university project, is also exploring other ways to build its own space elevator to put tourists in space in 2050. The company has said it could use carbon nanotube technology, which is more than 20 times stronger than steel, to build a lift shaft 96,000 kilometers (roughly 60,000 miles) above the Earth.


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Closed Loophole Confirms the Unreality of the Quantum World

Closed Loophole Confirms the Unreality of the Quantum World | The Chemical Industry by 2050 | Scoop.it
After researchers found a loophole in a famous experiment designed to prove that quantum objects don’t have intrinsic properties, three experimental groups quickly sewed the loophole shut. The episode closes the door on many “hidden variable” theories.

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United Airlines targets 50 pct cut in greenhouse gas emissions

United Airlines said on Thursday it has set a goal to cut its greenhouse gas emissions by 50 percent over the next few decades to help reduce its carbon footprint and its dependence on fossil fuels. The third-largest U.S. air carrier will invest more than $2 billion a year in more fuel-efficient aircraft, expanding its use of low-carbon biofuels in daily flights and implementing ways to better conserve fuel. "This is not only good for the environment but guards against oil price instability," Aaron Stash, a United manager of environmental strategy and sustainability, told reporters. Fuel costs account for a major portion of airlines' expenses, and rising oil prices over the past year have eaten in to industry profits, sending carriers scrambling to mitigate the impact.


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EcoVadis's curator insight, September 18, 2:28 AM

Remarkable initiative by United Airlines! Best practice for emissions policies is to communicate clear principles and objectives for the reduction of GHG emissions in qualitative and quantitative terms, reporting of Key performance indicators (KPIs) can have an even stronger, positive impact on a suppliers’ scorecard.

Stephane Bilodeau's curator insight, September 23, 9:01 PM
The third-largest U.S. air carrier will invest more than $2 billion a year in more fuel-efficient aircraft, expanding its use of low-carbon biofuels in daily flights and implementing ways to better conserve fuel. 

 "This is not only good for the environment but guards against oil price instability," Aaron Stash, a United manager of environmental strategy and sustainability, told reporters.
 
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AI just took a big step towards becoming more human

AI just took a big step towards becoming more human | The Chemical Industry by 2050 | Scoop.it
In recent months, researchers at OpenAI have been focusing on developing artificial intelligence (AI) that learns better.

Their machine learning algorithms are now capable of training themselves, so to speak, thanks to the reinforcement learning methods of their OpenAI Baselines.

Now, a new algorithm lets their AI learn from its own mistakes, almost as human beings do.

The development comes from a new open-source algorithm called Hindsight Experience Replay (HER), which OpenAI researchers released earlier this week.

As its name suggests, HER helps an AI agent "look back" in hindsight, so to speak, as it completes a task. Specifically, the AI reframes failures as successes, according to OpenAI's blog.

"The key insight that HER formalizes is what humans do intuitively: Even though we have not succeeded at a specific goal, we have at least achieved a different one," the researchers wrote.

"So why not just pretend that we wanted to achieve this goal to begin with, instead of the one that we set out to achieve originally?"

Simply put, this means that every failed attempt as an AI works towards a goal counts as another, unintended "virtual" goal.

Think back to when you learned how to ride a bike. On the first couple of tries, you actually failed to balance properly.

Even so, those attempts taught you how to not ride properly, and what to avoid when balancing on a bike. Every failure brought you closer to your goal, because that's how human beings learn.

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Handheld device sequences human genome

Handheld device sequences human genome | The Chemical Industry by 2050 | Scoop.it
Scientists have used a device that fits in the palm of the hand to sequence the human genome.

They say the feat, detailed in the journal Nature Biotechnology, opens up exciting possibilities for using genetics in routine medicine.

It is a far cry from the effort to sequence the first human genome which started in 1990.

The Human Genome Project took 13 years, laboratories around the world and hundreds of millions of dollars.

Since then there has been a revolution in cracking the code of life.

Science enters $1,000 genome era

Prof Nicholas Loman, one of the researchers and from the University of Birmingham, UK, told the BBC: "We've gone from a situation where you can only do genome sequencing for a huge amount of money in well equipped labs to one where we can have genome sequencing literally in your pocket just like a mobile phone.

"That gives us a really exciting opportunity to start having genome sequencing as a routine tool, perhaps something people can do in their own home."

Sequencing technology has the potential to change the way we do medicine.

Analysing the mutated DNA of cancers could be used to pick the best treatment. Or inspecting the genetic code of bacteria could spot antibiotic resistance early.

Prof Loman used the handheld device to track the spread of Ebola during the outbreak in West Africa.
Image copyright Oxford Nanopore

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Graphics Design's curator insight, January 30, 4:06 AM

 

static website design is less demanding than others. Moving the envelope documents enable you to move static pages starting with one server then onto the next or starting with one registry then onto the next.

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New Type of Optical Disk Can Store Data for More Than 600 Years

New Type of Optical Disk Can Store Data for More Than 600 Years | The Chemical Industry by 2050 | Scoop.it
Scientists developed a new, next-gen optical disk using gold nanoparticles, capable to store 10TB of data and has a lifespan of 600 years.
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Scientists Develop Nanorobots That Travel Through Your Bloodstream

Scientists Develop Nanorobots That Travel Through Your Bloodstream | The Chemical Industry by 2050 | Scoop.it
The nanorobots in question are made of gold, are 25 times thinner than a human hair strand and have been developed by a team of scientists from the University of California in San Diego. 
Their purpose? To eliminate bacteria and detoxify blood. 
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8 things you need to know about the IPCC 1.5˚C report

8 things you need to know about the IPCC 1.5˚C report | The Chemical Industry by 2050 | Scoop.it
The world is off track from its agreed-upon goal of limiting global warming, say leading climate scientists, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.
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Every Company Is a Data Company

Every Company Is a Data Company | The Chemical Industry by 2050 | Scoop.it
Every company is a data company. Whether they know it or not. So argue Jedidiah Yueh and Randy Bean in this provocative look at the corporate landscape. The authors argue that data companies will reinvent the world.

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Fortnite Lessons: How Data Lakes Can Help Democratize Data

Fortnite Lessons: How Data Lakes Can Help Democratize Data | The Chemical Industry by 2050 | Scoop.it
In a business world, the ability to democratize data is a cornerstone of competitive advantage.

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John Lasschuit ®™'s curator insight, October 5, 4:23 AM

By Shant Hovsepian. To truly democratize data, it is essential to leave it where it naturally resides without impeding the types or forms of analysis that are possible. 

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Top 5 Machine Learning Trends of 2018

Top 5 Machine Learning Trends of 2018 | The Chemical Industry by 2050 | Scoop.it
Machine learning opens up new avenues for Internet of Things, NLP, and self-teaching AI. Machine learning jobs are in hot demand, the human adaptability to machine learning has led to a heavy reliance on robotic process automation. Machine learning algorithms assist IT operations teams to find the root cause of issues.

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European Supermarket Giant Carrefour Joins IBM Food Trust Food Blockchain Project

European Supermarket Giant Carrefour Joins IBM Food Trust Food Blockchain Project | The Chemical Industry by 2050 | Scoop.it

Carrefour will use the IBM Food Trust blockchain platform to expand its product range internationally while tracking more than 12,000 operational stores across 33 countries.


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New materials with mysterious properties could transform aerospace industry

The discovery of a new group of smart materials could transform the aerospace industry with more efficient and quieter engines.

A team of researchers from Texas A&M University has announced the discovery of a group of smart materials with the potential to transform the aerospace industry.

Based on early promise, it is believed they could not only one day significantly improve the efficiency of fuel burn in jet engines, but could also reduce engine noise over residential areas.

In fact, researcher Dr Ibrahim Karaman believes the materials could open up a whole new field of scientific research.

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AI algorithm teaches a car to drive from scratch in 20 minutes

A pair of artificial intelligence Ph.Ds from Cambridge University are going all-in on machine learning as the foundation of autonomous cars. Their company, Wayve, has just released video of a kitted-out Renault Twizy teaching itself to follow a lane from scratch, over the course of about 20 minutes.

 

Wayve's Amar Shah and Alex Kendall believe there's been too much hand-engineering going on as people try to solve the self-driving car problem. "The missing piece of the self-driving puzzle is intelligent algorithms, not more sensors, rules and maps," says Shah, Wayve co-founder and CEO. "Humans have a fascinating ability to perform complex tasks in the real world, because our brains allow us to learn quickly and transfer knowledge across our many experiences. We want to give our vehicles better brains, not more hardware."


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Robots in workplace 'could create double the jobs they destroy' | Business | The Guardian

Robots in workplace 'could create double the jobs they destroy' | Business | The Guardian | The Chemical Industry by 2050 | Scoop.it
Rise of machines could lead to 133m jobs globally in next decade – WEF report

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Graham Watson's curator insight, September 17, 2:10 AM

As I've said all along, increased automation involves both substituting for existing workers and complementing them, and the latest World Economic Forum research is quite explicit about this.

 

It predicts that robots will create twice the number of jobs they destroy, changing the future world of work. 

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Would universal basic income sap the workforce?

Would universal basic income sap the workforce? | The Chemical Industry by 2050 | Scoop.it
Would universal basic income cause people to leave the workforce? New research suggests it would not.

Such proposals, including one that Hillary Clinton considered during her 2016 presidential campaign, include direct payments that ensure each resident has a baseline of income to provide for basic needs. While previous research has focused on the effects of these unconditional cash transfers at the micro level—for example, winning the lottery—this study examined their large-scale impact by looking a government program that has supported Alaska residents for the past 25 years.

In a working paper, associate professor Damon Jones of the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy and assistant professor Ioana Marinescu of the University of Pennsylvania School of Social Policy and Practice (formerly of the University of Chicago) examined the effect of unconditional cash transfers on labor markets using the Alaska Permanent Fund Dividend—a payout from a diversified portfolio of invested oil reserve royalties, established in 1982.

They concluded unconditional cash transfers had no significant effect on employment, yet it increased part-time work.

“It is reasonable to expect an unconditional cash transfer, such as a universal income, to decrease employment,” Jones says. “A key concern with a universal basic income is that it could discourage people from working, but our research shows that the possible reductions in employment seem to be offset by increases in spending that in turn increase the demand for more workers.”

With only a few exceptions, every Alaskan who has been a resident for at least 12 months is entitled to a dividend from the Alaska Permanent Fund, which as of August 2017 is worth nearly $61 billion. In recent years, the payment, which residents receive through direct deposit, has averaged about $2,000 a year in a lump sum. But because it is a per-person amount, a household of four could receive more than $8,000.

Jones and Marinescu examined the effects of a large number of people receiving a cash transfer. Notably the researchers found that:

There is no significant effect, positive or negative, on employment as a whole, although part-time work does increase by 1.8 percentage points, or about 17 percent.
There is a difference in the effect of the unconditional cash transfer in sectors that produce goods or services that can be traded outside of Alaska and those that cannot. Part-time work increases and employment decreases in the tradable sector, but the effects in the non-tradable sector are insignificant.
Any negative effects in the non-tradable sector, meanwhile, are offset by positive macro effects.

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Deep neural network models score higher than humans in reading and comprehension test | KurzweilAI

Deep neural network models score higher than humans in reading and comprehension test | KurzweilAI | The Chemical Industry by 2050 | Scoop.it
(credit: Alibaba Group) Microsoft and Alibaba have developed deep neural network models that scored higher than humans in a Stanford University reading and

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Groundbreaking Treatment Cures Woman's Advanced Breast Cancer in World First

Groundbreaking Treatment Cures Woman's Advanced Breast Cancer in World First | The Chemical Industry by 2050 | Scoop.it
After being given 3 years to live, one woman teamed up with doctors and used a new treatment to cure her seemingly incurable form of breast cancer.
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Storing data in DNA brings nature into the digital universe

Storing data in DNA brings nature into the digital universe | The Chemical Industry by 2050 | Scoop.it
Humanity is producing data at an unimaginable rate, to the point that storage technologies can't keep up. Every five years, the amount of data we're producing increases 10-fold, including photos and videos. Not all of i
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