The brain and illusions
27.3K views | +0 today
Follow
The brain and illusions
What can illusions teach us about the brain?
Curated by Gerald Carey
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Gerald Carey
Scoop.it!

The Illusion of Taste

The Illusion of Taste | The brain and illusions | Scoop.it
How packaging can make food more flavorful.
Gerald Carey's insight:

This lengthy article is an excellent introduction into how food container shapes and colours can affect how the food tastes. It includes information on potato chips, chocolate and Coke.  It reviews the work of Charles Spence, a professor of experimental psychology at Oxford University.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gerald Carey
Scoop.it!

Taste illusions

Taste illusions | The brain and illusions | Scoop.it
I've just found a 2008 review article on the multisensory perception of flavour that is full of fascinating examples of taste illusions and demonstrates the surprisingly complexity of the gustatory...
Gerald Carey's insight:

Very interesting article from "Mind Hacks" on the confusion between smell and taste.

The article has a link to the pdf version of the 2008 study (long read) and I have added that link here.

http://www.nstu.net/malika-auvray/files/malika-auvray-auvray_spence_2008_cc.pdf

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gerald Carey
Scoop.it!

Sweet or sour? Duping our taste buds

Sweet or sour? Duping our taste buds | The brain and illusions | Scoop.it

What can you taste when you swirl a mouthful of malt whisky around your mouth? Peaty flavours, honey, sea salt? Talk to any whisky drinker and they'll be happy to discuss at length.

Gerald Carey's insight:

This article is about a whole new field of study called "neurogastronomy - everything we eat or drink is processed by our senses."

Nothing new there. However, some senses can interfere with the taste and smell of some foods and drinks.

more...
CogFit-Quest's curator insight, April 17, 2014 1:57 PM

Like to eat? Well then you will find this new discipline, labelled "neurogastronomy", absolutely fascinating!

Scooped by Gerald Carey
Scoop.it!

Does the brain remember smell? Does altitude affect the taste of food? Why does the thought of frozen food cause goosebumps? | media | triple j

Does the brain remember smell? Does altitude affect the taste of food? Why does the thought of frozen food cause goosebumps? | media | triple j | The brain and illusions | Scoop.it

A podcast by Dr Karl and special guest, Professor Charles Spence, on the ways in which we can fool our senses. Great podcast with some interesting information on the sense of taste and smell.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gerald Carey
Scoop.it!

Food Illusions: why we eat more than we think

Food Illusions: why we eat more than we think | The brain and illusions | Scoop.it

Click here (http://mindlesseating.org/pdf/NutriAction(2004)-Wansink.pdf) if the title link does not work.

A good explanation explaining how we foo ourselves we we eat.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gerald Carey
Scoop.it!

Organic Honey Is A Sweet Illusion | Compound Eye, Scientific American Blog Network

Organic Honey Is A Sweet Illusion | Compound Eye, Scientific American Blog Network | The brain and illusions | Scoop.it

Forgive the off-topic post, but today is Food Day here at Scientific American. As I teach a university beekeeping class, I'd like to talk about honey.

Considering the revered place of honey as the oldest natural sweetener, and considering that its insect makers- honey bees- are highly intolerant of pesticides, you might think honey would be the easiest food crop to produce for the “organic” food market. But you’d be wrong.

(A post about things we would like to believe are true but are probably not)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gerald Carey
Scoop.it!

Gustatory aura symptoms

Gustatory aura symptoms | The brain and illusions | Scoop.it

Migraine sufferers can experience illusions or hallucinations of taste as gustatory aura symptoms. The differential diagnosis of these symptoms includes temporal lobe epilepsy, now more commonly called complex partial seizure disorder, so that a neurological examination is warranted in each case presenting with such gustatory symptoms.

(Here is the link if there is none in the title: http://www.migraine-aura.org/content/e27891/e27265/e26585/e26771/index_en.html)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gerald Carey
Scoop.it!

Taste Illusion

Students taste and record the flavour of two types of cordial, one pink and one green. The responses are tallied before the astonishing secret is revealed. Apart from green food colouring, the samples are identical and taste exactly the same. The surprising revelation about our preconceptions of flavours may even help some students reassess their attitudes to a nemesis vegetable. 

(Note: should link to a pdf - if not, go here: http://www.abc.net.au/science/surfingscientist/pdf/lesson_plan21_tasteIllusion.pdf)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gerald Carey
Scoop.it!

The Weird Connections Between Hearing and Taste

The Weird Connections Between Hearing and Taste | The brain and illusions | Scoop.it
Headphones could make those Pringles seem crunchier.
Gerald Carey's insight:

Recount of a couple of experiments (including the well-known "Pringle" test) showing how sound influences our perception of flavour. I think the author is too quick to jump to conclusions about this BUT it is worth reading about how restaurants and supermarket chain use sound or music in their stores.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gerald Carey
Scoop.it!

Tasting With Our Eyes: Why Bright Blue Chicken Looks So Strange

Tasting With Our Eyes: Why Bright Blue Chicken Looks So Strange | The brain and illusions | Scoop.it
The color of food can affect how we perceive its taste, and food companies aren't afraid to use that to their advantage. An artist tests perceptions by dousing familiar foods with unorthodox colors.
Gerald Carey's insight:

Woah!  Check out the pink cereal and green icecream with purple fudge.

Colour can affect the way we view a food but also affect how it tastes!  How?

Read on!  (Source: NPR)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gerald Carey
Scoop.it!

Food Tastes Bland While Multitasking

Food Tastes Bland While Multitasking | The brain and illusions | Scoop.it
Paying mindful attention to one's food leads people to eat less but savor it more
Gerald Carey's insight:

Being distracted whilst eating can reduce our sense of taste - so we eat more! Whaaaat?

Unforntuately, you have to pay to see the details of the article but it makes for an interesting abstract.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gerald Carey
Scoop.it!

Your dinnerware may be sabotaging your diet

Your dinnerware may be sabotaging your diet | The brain and illusions | Scoop.it
Most people make upwards of 250 food-related decisions a day. Sound high? That's because researchers believe the majority of these decisions are made unconsciously, and that many of our eating habits are actually driven by subtle environmental cues.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gerald Carey
Scoop.it!

A Hint of Hype, A Taste of Illusion

A Hint of Hype, A Taste of Illusion | The brain and illusions | Scoop.it
Studies say the wine-rating system is badly flawed. How the experts fare against a coin toss.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gerald Carey
Scoop.it!

Part II ~ Non-Sensory Factors and The Psychology of Quality

Part II ~ Non-Sensory Factors and The Psychology of Quality | The brain and illusions | Scoop.it

Non-Sensory Information
It is a common assumption that whether or not we like a wine is determined by its sensory attributes such as taste and aroma. But a wine is loaded with non-sensory stimuli as well, which the brain is processing even before the cork is pulled. Why else does a wine taste great on a Tuscan hillside, in romantic company but when you return home and buy a bottle, you realize it’s a modest Chianti?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gerald Carey
Scoop.it!

Taste Test

Taste Test | The brain and illusions | Scoop.it

The senses of sight and taste are technically unrelated but they can have a strong psychological influence on each other. There are thousands of taste buds on your tongue, most being found on or between bumps called papillae which cover the tongue surface (you can just see these papillae with the naked eye). ‘Taste buds’ are actually chemo–receptor cells which each have a pit of a very specific shape. When a substance with the matching chemical shape comes along, the receptor cell sends a signal to the brain.

more...
No comment yet.