The Boyle-ing Point
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The Boyle-ing Point
“We shall not cease from exploration, and the end of all our exploring will be to arrive where we started and to know the place for the first time.” – T.S. Eliot
Curated by Emma Boyle
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Why is Bulgaria's population falling off a cliff?

Why is Bulgaria's population falling off a cliff? | The Boyle-ing Point | Scoop.it

What is life like in the country projected to have the world's fastest-shrinking population? Additionally, Bulgaria shares a border with Turkey that they are determined to defend. Many interesting themes intertwined in this case study: ethnic identity, border conflict, refugees, birth rates, employment structures, etc.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 22, 2:24 PM

This is a good case-study to show how demographic decline coupled with economic decline, with exacerbate problems with a  consistent out-migration flow.   

 

Tags: Bulgaria, declining populationpopulationmigration.

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Mexico City, Parched and Sinking, Faces a Water Crisis

Mexico City, Parched and Sinking, Faces a Water Crisis | The Boyle-ing Point | Scoop.it
Climate change is threatening to push a crowded capital toward a breaking point.
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Here Are the Real Boundaries of American Metropolises, Decided by an Algorithm

Here Are the Real Boundaries of American Metropolises, Decided by an Algorithm | The Boyle-ing Point | Scoop.it
How is the U.S. actually split geographically?
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Water, water everywhere: How being surrounded by water made the Dutch different - DutchNews.nl

Water, water everywhere: How being surrounded by water made the Dutch different - DutchNews.nl | The Boyle-ing Point | Scoop.it
Water, water everywhere: How being surrounded by water made the Dutch different
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The sky is now her limit

The sky is now her limit | The Boyle-ing Point | Scoop.it

"Cartoon shows a young woman carrying buckets on a yoke, looking up at ladder ascending up to the sky, bottom rungs labeled 'Slavery,' 'House Drudgery,' and 'Shop Work.' Top rungs labeled 'Equal Suffrage,' 'Wage Equity,' and 'Presidency.'


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 27, 2016 1:34 PM

An alternative title for this political cartoon that was published in August 1920, was "Enfranchisement now means the sky's the limit, in woman's sphere."  Nearly 100 years later it seems quite likely that the presidency (the symbolic top rung on this ladder) will be reached next month.  However, the election of President Barack Obama in 2008 did not signify that the United States entered a post-racial era where full racial equality is not a matter of fact.  Similarly, the election of a woman, while still being a monumental achievement, won't mean that full gender equality has been achieved.  I look at the rungs on the ladder and see that "Wage Equity" was seen place about 3/4ths of the way up.  While women certainly make more than they have in the past, they don't earn as much money as their male counterparts in the workforce.  Who would have guessed in 1920 that full wage equity would be more elusive than the presidency?

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The world’s most spoken languages

The world’s most spoken languages | The Boyle-ing Point | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 17, 2016 11:31 AM

This infographic is a great way to visualize the dominant languages on Earth.  Since this only counts one language per person, mother tongues are listed.  Consequently, lingua franca's such as English and France are smaller than you might have presumed them to be.  

 

Tags: language, culture, infographic.

ROCAFORT's curator insight, October 8, 2016 2:39 AM
The world’s most spoken languages
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African Activist: Stop Using Western Aid to Force Leftist Values on Our Cultures | The Stream

African Activist: Stop Using Western Aid to Force Leftist Values on Our Cultures | The Stream | The Boyle-ing Point | Scoop.it
Obianuju Ekeocha's organization defends African culture from Western governments and charities that undermine the natural family and promote abortion.
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The Richest Man in India Is Giving Free Internet to Millions of People

The Richest Man in India Is Giving Free Internet to Millions of People | The Boyle-ing Point | Scoop.it
A new high-speed internet service called Reliance Jio just became available to almost a billion people through India—and at affordable prices.

The new internet service is founded by India's richest man, Mukesh Ambani, who promised to deliver low-cost internet that would allow for video streaming at low prices.

The network—which reaches more than 80 percent of the country mostly through smartphones—began with an introductory offer that allows Indians to use Jio for internet and phone calls for free through the end of this year and then pay as little as 149 rupees, or $2.25, per month after that. Ambani said that voice calls would be free for life on the Jio network.

Only about 20 percent of Indians can access the Internet because the infrastructure needed to bring fast internet to poorer areas was never available and there aren't many public Wi-Fi areas.

Ambani is building this network up from scratch and hopes to reach 90 percent of the population by March.

This innovation comes on the heels of Facebook's Aquila aircraft that would bring affordable internet to millions of people in remote locations around the world.
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Cartograms of the Olympic Games

Cartograms of the Olympic Games | The Boyle-ing Point | Scoop.it
The distribution of medals shows the existing Olympic inequalities: The overall patterns are a reflection of wealth distribution in the world, raising the question whether money can buy sporting success. Besides investment in sports by those countries who can afford it, the medal tables also reflect a battle for global supremacy in political terms.

 

Tags: sport, popular culture, mapping, historical, cartography.


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PIRatE Lab's curator insight, August 15, 2016 8:32 PM
Another very interesting way to present geographic data.
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The rise of the Asian megacity (and why 'metacities' are the next big thing)

The rise of the Asian megacity (and why 'metacities' are the next big thing) | The Boyle-ing Point | Scoop.it

"Asia's rapid urbanisation is changing the very shape and nature of what we think of as a city.  It's not just the rapid increase in their numbers or their sheer size that makes these megacities fascinating. They look, feel and behave differently, too."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 12, 2016 2:29 PM

The term megacity (a city with a population greater than 10 million) has been around for a while and there wasn't much linguistic need to describe something bigger.  Today, most megacities are more like Lagos and Mumbai, places of extreme wealth asymmetries than the global cities of New York City and London.  Some are now using the term metacity to describe cities with populations of 20 million.  Asian metacities are a good place to start thinking about the largest urban regions that are increasingly dominating economic, political and cultural affairs.      

 

Tags: urbanmegacitiesEast Asia.

Lee Hancock's curator insight, November 1, 2016 8:48 PM

Mega city to Meta city...

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The Best Things about Life in America, According to Immigrants

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Refugees boost German cricket teams - BBC News

Refugees boost German cricket teams - BBC News | The Boyle-ing Point | Scoop.it
Germany's recent influx of migrants has led to an unexpected boom in cricket - a sport which is rarely played in the country.

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Olympic exclusion zone: the gentrification of a Rio favela

Olympic exclusion zone: the gentrification of a Rio favela | The Boyle-ing Point | Scoop.it
Residents of Babilônia complain they are being callously pushed out as the favela undergoes a rapid ‘upgrade’ ahead of this summer’s Olympics. Jo Griffin, who has been working there, hears the inside story of Rio’s gentrification project

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Europe's Population Change (2001 to 2011)

Europe's Population Change (2001 to 2011) | The Boyle-ing Point | Scoop.it
The map provides a level of detail previously unavailable. It is the first ever to collect data published by all of Europe’s municipalities.

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HumdeBut's curator insight, September 25, 12:12 PM
Voici une carte bien intéressante,où l'on peut voir les pôles d'attraction !
M Sullivan's curator insight, September 28, 9:41 PM
Interesting looking at Europe's population change. Good reference for analysing geographical trends.
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, September 29, 3:04 AM

Global challenges: Population 

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The Staggering Wealth Of Mexico City

The Staggering Wealth Of Mexico City | The Boyle-ing Point | Scoop.it
Walk on the streets and you´ll be exposed to its informal economy: people who do what they can to eke out a living including washing windshields, selling food, or even singing, dancing, and performing acrobatics for a tip.

What Americans may not know is that Mexico City is home to the wealthiest people, the poshest neighborhoods, the most exclusive shops, entertainment venues, and cultural centers on the planet.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 1, 2016 12:57 PM

Mexico City has been the economic center of Mexico for a long time and is a true primate city. "Wealth accumulation in Mexico City has historically been concentrated in the hands of a few. In colonial times, the elite was mostly composed of Spanish-born immigrants who held high-ranking offices or worked as business owners or export-oriented merchants. Later, the wealthy were those who owned large estates known as haciendas…It is estimated that around 40 percent of Mexico’s income is owned by just 10 percent of its population, while 52.3 percent of Mexican citizens live in poverty."

 

Tags: urban, megacitieseconomic, labor, Mexico.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, December 30, 2016 8:13 PM

Contrasts found in large cities 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, March 22, 11:08 AM
unit 6 and 7
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Factory farming practices are under scrutiny again in N.C. after disastrous hurricane floods

Factory farming practices are under scrutiny again in N.C. after disastrous hurricane floods | The Boyle-ing Point | Scoop.it
As fecal waste and bacteria flow from hog lagoons into the water supply, North Carolina is revisiting a contentious battle between the pork industry, health experts and environmentalists.

 

In regions where hog farm density is high, there is an overall poor sanitary quality of surface waters. The presence of mass-scale swine and poultry lots and processing plants in a sandy floodplain – a region once dotted by small tobacco farms – has long posed a difficult dilemma for a state where swine and poultry represent billions of dollars a year for the economy. [Past] hurricane’s environmental impact in North Carolina were so severe in part because of the large number of hog lagoon breaches. Following Hurricane Matthew, the department has counted 10 to 12 lagoons that were inundated, with floodwaters topping the berms and spreading diluted waste.

 

Tags: food, agriculture, agribusiness, unit 5 agriculture, agricultural environment, environment, environment modify, pollution. 


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Articles | Culture Of Life Africa

Articles | Culture Of Life Africa | The Boyle-ing Point | Scoop.it
An African Woman’s Open Letter to Melinda Gates “Culture of Life Africa” Launches to Promote Pro-Life in Africa Special Report: Africa In The Redefined
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Why Malthus Is Still Wrong

Why Malthus Is Still Wrong | The Boyle-ing Point | Scoop.it
Why Malthus makes for bad science policy

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 6, 2016 9:53 AM

The ideas of Thomas Malthus have always loomed large; the scope includes some of the biggest issues facing humanity's continued existence on this planet.  His controversial ideas have been debated and inspired some policies that were especially damaging.  This anti-Malthusian op-ed was written by the Publisher of Skeptic Magazine; I typically pair this with the neo-Malthusian op-ed written by the  President of the Canada's Population institute.  Comparing and contrasting the merits of these articles provides a way to get student to assess the strengths of an argument and to identify the bias/perspective of the author.  

 

Questions to Ponder: What did Malthus get right?  What did he get wrong? 

 

Tagsop-ed, demographics, population, APHG, unit 2 population

Alex Smiga's curator insight, August 6, 8:05 AM
What did Malthus get right? and what did he get wrong?
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All Maps Are Biased. Google Maps’ New Redesign Doesn’t Hide It.

All Maps Are Biased. Google Maps’ New Redesign Doesn’t Hide It. | The Boyle-ing Point | Scoop.it
On Monday, Google rolled out its new Maps design. You’ve probably already forgotten what the old one looked like, but the new version is cleaner and m
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Cartograms of the Olympic Games

Cartograms of the Olympic Games | The Boyle-ing Point | Scoop.it
The distribution of medals shows the existing Olympic inequalities: The overall patterns are a reflection of wealth distribution in the world, raising the question whether money can buy sporting success. Besides investment in sports by those countries who can afford it, the medal tables also reflect a battle for global supremacy in political terms.

 

Tags: sport, popular culture, mapping, historical, cartography.


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PIRatE Lab's curator insight, August 15, 2016 8:32 PM
Another very interesting way to present geographic data.
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Abandoned Olympic venues

Abandoned Olympic venues | The Boyle-ing Point | Scoop.it

The Winter and Summer Olympics are celebrated events worldwide. But the cost of such games is high for host countries, which spend billions, if not tens of billions, of dollars on the events.

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So, our Geography professor shared this with us. Food for thought, maybe?

So, our Geography professor shared this with us. Food for thought, maybe? | The Boyle-ing Point | Scoop.it
So, our Geography professor shared this with us. Food for thought, maybe? - 9GAG has the best funny pics, GIFs, videos, memes, cute, wtf, geeky, cosplay photos on the web. We are your best source of happiness and awesomeness.
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