The Book of Daemonology and the divine right of Kings
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King James I: Demonologist

King James I: Demonologist | The Book of Daemonology and the divine right of Kings | Scoop.it
This article describes King James' book and his views on witchcraft. The Book of Daemonology, written by King James is a rebuttal to skeptical work from Reginald Scot. Within his book tells his view on witchcraft and how he feels threatened by them. Also that he believe that witch will take over and be in charge. It even went as far as questions the existence of witches. When he became King of England his views became known throughout England. He passed acts and tried to stop the witchcraft within the people. Later on a play written by Shakespeare , Macbeth was based on King James' views. Shakespeare wanted to please the king and this is how he was doing it.
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Jim Shorts's comment, October 27, 2012 5:11 PM
This article shows the extent of King James' obsession on witches and witchcraft. Whoever found this did a good job. Wish my group had found somthing like it. -Damien
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The Life of King James I:DIvine Right of Kings and Daemonology

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King James I, On Divine Right of Kings

King James I, On Divine Right of Kings | The Book of Daemonology and the divine right of Kings | Scoop.it

King James's the Divine Right of Kings focuses on the relationship between Earthly kings and Gods, and King James writes about how Kings and Gods need to be worshipped accordingly. the King consistently makes note that Kings are the liutenants Gods and they are even given the title of Gods by the Gods themselves. He tells that just as disputing the rules of a God is blasphemy, it is also such a crime to dispute the laws of a king. He also notes that since Kings are as Gods on Earth, they must not be challenged on what they know, for as King James notes "..do not meddle with the main points of government; that is my craft . . . to meddle with that were to lesson me . . . I must not be taught my office". This quote implies that it is undermining for a subject to challenge their ruler in what is his specialty. King James also mentions in his writing that subjects should not argue the laws set down throughout history by ancient predeccessors as they were passed down to him through God.  The focus point of the Divine Right of Kings is that, as a result of Kings being gifted their powers through Gods, they should be treated and appealed to as such.

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Llewellyn Worldwide - Articles: The Witch Mania of King James I

Llewellyn Worldwide - Articles: The Witch Mania of King James I | The Book of Daemonology and the divine right of Kings | Scoop.it

This article describes the origins of King James’ Book of Demonology. It was during a time when witchcraft had been whispered about in Norway and Denmark. King James had just married his wife but he had not been with her during the wedding. When his new bride was on her way to meet James in Scotland, she encountered great storms which caused her to stop in Norway. When James heard of this news, he traveled to Norway to seek his bride. Along the way he also encountered stormy and dangerous seas. He was convinced that the reasoning behind all of this was that witches were trying to keep him and his bride apart by sinking his ship and killing him. After this incident, King James I took a special interest in witch trials nearby and became a prominent asset in the accusations and convictions. Hundreds were killed at his hands. He even used his power as king to overrule any supposed witches who were found not guilty in trial. He wrote his book, The Book of Demonology, as a warning to the public. He believed that it was his duty to eliminate witchcraft and protect Christianity. He also believed that by writing the book he could protect himself further from the evil and be a member of God’s army.

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nicolette tomasetti's comment, November 13, 2012 7:31 PM
The topic of witches has caused many people to do questionably crazy things throughout history, King James included. Once the witch mania began in Europe, anything that went wrong was immediately blamed on witches. King James I felt it was his duty to warn the public of the dangers of witches through his Book of Daemonology. It was very proactive and courageous for King James to use his book and government position to try and protect his people from something he considered to truly be dangerous. Even though his intentions were good, the means he used to protect his country killed many innocent people. -Jordan Fleming
Arthur Johnsen's comment, November 14, 2012 11:13 AM
I think that King James I childhood was very intresting. He was very sickly and that devoted him to his studies. I also think that from a psychological standpoint his childhood could have influenced his decisions as an adult regarding witchcraft. He became feared as a king because of his unfair judgements toward witches. To supplement this he wrote the book on daemonology. This aided him in justifying the punishments he dealt. I feel that King James was very unfair and did not give fair trials to accused witches. I think that the review written on the article was very accurate and leaves no room for refute. AJ JOHNSEN
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Divine Right of Kings

The theory of divine right came from the medieval idea that God bestowed earthly power onto kings.  This is similar to the idea today that God bestows his power upon the church, with the pope as its leader.  It originated with King James I of England, which gave him power in political and spiritual matters.  The theory of divine right was abandoned in England during the Glorious Revolution of 1688–89.  The American and French revolutions further weakened the theory's appeal, and by the early twentieth century, it had been virtually abandoned.  The Scots textbooks of the divine right of kings were written in 1597-98 by James VI of Scotland before he took the English throne.  He wrote the Basilikon Doron, which was a manual on the duties of a king.  According to the text, a good king "acknowledgeth himself ordained for his people, having received from the god a burden of government, whereof he must be countable." The idea of the divine right to rule has appeared in many Eastern and Western cultures that spanned all the way back to the first god king Gilgamesh.

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