The Book of Daemonology
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The Book of Daemonology
Jiali, Anne, Marissa, Sydney
Curated by Jiali Zhuo
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King James I, witches, and Macbeth

1905, Shakespears wrote a new play about witches to pleased the new king of the England, James I. The play put a lot of different of kings together, King James saw his own reflection in the play. Undoubtly, the play was wrote for King James. King James was very interesting in witch hunting. He was the greatest witch hunter of England. King James tried to destory all his study of witchcraft, but appearantly he failed. Because the copy of his study is all over the world. Many details from the play Macbeth is undoubtly to impress King James. King James was so fancinated by witchcraft, he even wrote his own treaties on the subject.

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Shakespeare's Sources for Macbeth: King James and Witchcraft, and More...

A detailed look at King James' connection to witchcraft and Shakespeare's Macbeth...

 

In  1597 King James wrote a novel called The Book of Demonology. When King James was writing his book around the same time Shakespeare was writing his play Macbeth. It seems to be that Shakespeare wrote the play similar to King James’s book. Acts in Shakespeare plays are very visible from chapters in King James’s book. In the second book of The Book of  Demonology chapter three  King James’s writes :For where the Magicians, as allured by curiositie, in the most parte of their practices, seekes principallie the satisfying of the same, and to winne to themselves a popular honoure and estimation: These witches on the other patre, being intised either for the desire of revenge, or of worldly riches, their whole practices are either to hurte men and their gudes, or what they possesse This compares to Act 1 scene three  in the Play of Macbeth. This compares to the actions of the weird sisters in the play. There are many acts in Macbeth that compare to King James book. Shakespeare was not trying to plagiarize King James’s book he was trying to please and acknowledge King James. 

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Witches and King James :: Life and Times :: Internet Shakespeare Editions

Witches and King James :: Life and Times :: Internet Shakespeare Editions | The Book of Daemonology | Scoop.it

Before King James became King, he wrote a book called The Book of Daemonolgie. The book was about witchcraft, which he believed in . He had a strange interest in witchcraft and attended many witch trials. In the book James has arguments favoring witchcraft. He explains that witchcraft is in fact real and argues that people who practice withcraft should be punished. King James keeps reminding the jugdes that whatever the suspects say were not true. James believed that parts of the play Macbeth were designed to complimentary to his view to the witchcraft, and his opinion in the Book of Daemonology.

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King James I (1566-1625)

Clip from the History File series, which discusses the life and reign of King James I of England, who was also King James VI of Scotland.

This Video is a clip from the History File series which discusses the life of King James I of England. 

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King James I: Demonologist

King James I: Demonologist | The Book of Daemonology | Scoop.it
By Mary Sharratt Even by the standards of his age,” King James VI of Scotland, later James I of England, stood out as a deeply superstitious man, obsessed with the occult.

 

During the reign of King James I persecution of people dealing with or thought to be using "witchcraft" raised to a level never seen before. James held witch trials leading to dozen to be burned at the stake before he had become the ruler of England. He wrote The Book of Demonology to warn people of the "satanic witchcraft" plaguing the nation. With it he fought the words of the skeptic and none believers. As king of England, James used his power to fight this "plague" by making witchcraft liable to be punished by execution. The superstation and paranoia if King James caused a daisy chain of events, inspiring the witches in Shakespeare’s Hamlet, witch trials created to win his favor, etc...

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