The animals and animal's conservation
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Stop Wildlife Crime: The Series - It's Dead Serious (Video 1) | WWF

[WARNING: CONTAINS GRAPHIC IMAGES] Wildlife crime is dead serious. This low-risk, high-profit crime threatens some of the world's best-loved species--and the...
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Why human is killing wildlife like elephant, rhino and etc. for money.

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African Elephant Facts for Kids | Elephants | African Animals

African Elephant Facts for Kids | Elephants | African Animals | The animals and animal's conservation | Scoop.it
Did you know that elephants hold grudges? Learn more interesting African elephant facts at Animal Fact Guide.
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-African elephant Weighing up to 6000 kg (6.6 tons) and measuring up to 3.3 m (10 ft.) at the shoulder, the African elephant is the world’s largest land mammal. It is characterized by its highly dexterous trunk, long curved tusks, and massive ears.


-Having adapted to life across Africa’s diverse ecosystems, the African elephant plays a vital role in maintaining ecological harmony. African elephants ingest plants and fruits, walk for miles, and excrete the seeds in fertile dung piles. In this way, new plants can grow in different areas and can cross fertilize. In fact, 90 different tree species rely on the elephant for propagation. African elephants also dig holes to expose underground springs. This allows smaller animals to access water in drier times. 


-Upon successful mating, the male elephant will move on to other herds, and the female will start a 22-month gestation period. When the calf is born, aunts, sisters, and cousins all help care for the newborn. In this way, all the elephants of the herd learn essential lessons in rearing a baby. And since elephants only give birth once every 5 years, successfully raising their offspring is critical to their survival.


-Both male and female elephants possess tusks, which are modified incisor teeth. Although tusks are present at birth, the “baby tusks” fall out after a year, and permanent ones replace them. These tusks will continue to grow throughout the elephant’s life. Similar to the trunk, elephant tusks are utilized in a wide range of activities. They are used for digging, foraging, and fighting. At times, they also act as a resting place for the elephant’s very heavy trunk.


 

 

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African Elephants, African Elephant Pictures, African Elephant Facts - National Geographic

African Elephants, African Elephant Pictures, African Elephant Facts - National Geographic | The animals and animal's conservation | Scoop.it
Learn all you wanted to know about African elephants with pictures, videos, photos, facts, and news from National Geographic.
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-Elephant ears radiate heat to help keep these large animals cool, but sometimes the African heat is too much. Elephants are fond of water and enjoy showering by sucking water into their trunks and spraying it all over themselves.


-An elephant's trunk is actually a long nose used for smelling, breathing, trumpeting, drinking, and also for grabbing things—especially a potential meal. The trunk alone contains about 100,000 different muscles. 


-Both male and female African elephants have tusks they use to dig for food and water and strip bark from trees. 

 

- Elephants eat roots, grasses, fruit, and bark, and they eat a lot of these things. An adult elephant can consume up to 300 pounds (136 kilograms) of food in a single day.

 -Because ivory is so valuable to some humans, many elephants have been killed for their tusks. This trade is illegal today, but it has not been completely eliminated, and some African elephant populations remain endangered.
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African Elephant | Species | WWF

African Elephant | Species | WWF | The animals and animal's conservation | Scoop.it
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-The African elephant is the largest animal walking the Earth. Their herds wander through 37 countries in Africa. They are easily recognized by their trunk that is used for communication

 

-African elephants have less room to roam than ever before as expanding human populations convert land for agriculture, settlements and developments. 

 

-An estimated 100,000 elephants were killed each year and up to 80% of herds were lost in some regions. In recent years, growing demand for ivory, particularly from Asia.

 

-To reduce the illegal killing of elephants through improved protection and management, WWF equips and trains law enforcement teams so they can conduct regular and effective antipoaching patrols. We help establish new protected areas within elephant ranges and improve management effectiveness within existing protected areas.

 

- WWF has helped train park guards, villagers and communities in elephant conservation and management. In Quirimbas National Park, Mozambique, WWF worked with the local government and community to establish a park management system that would protect wildlife and livelihoods. WWF also develops and supports community-based wildlife management plans that contribute to elephant conservation while providing benefits to local people.

 

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