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Impact of the internet age on human culture and education policy/administration
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Interview: Chip Bell and Marshall Goldsmith on Art of Effective Mentoring | #Infographic

Interview: Chip Bell and Marshall Goldsmith on Art of Effective Mentoring | #Infographic | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Last week, Chip R. Bell and Marshall Goldsmith released the revised edition of their classic book “Managers as Mentors: Building Partnerships for Learning”.

 

This week, they open up in a free-flow conversation with QAspire on the art of effective mentoring. In my view, this interview is almost a definitive guide to become a great mentor!

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=Mentoring+Instead+of+Teaching

 

https://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=Mentorship

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2016/07/13/coaching-instead-of-teaching-in-modern-education/

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/12/19/teaching-was-yesterday-today-is-coaching-the-learners-students-for-learning-to-learn/

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/07/10/education-collaboration-and-coaching-the-future/

 


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Gust MEES's curator insight, November 19, 2:19 PM
Last week, Chip R. Bell and Marshall Goldsmith released the revised edition of their classic book “Managers as Mentors: Building Partnerships for Learning”.

 

This week, they open up in a free-flow conversation with QAspire on the art of effective mentoring. In my view, this interview is almost a definitive guide to become a great mentor!

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=Mentoring+Instead+of+Teaching

 

https://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=Mentorship

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2016/07/13/coaching-instead-of-teaching-in-modern-education/

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/12/19/teaching-was-yesterday-today-is-coaching-the-learners-students-for-learning-to-learn/

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/07/10/education-collaboration-and-coaching-the-future/

 

Jerry Busone's curator insight, November 20, 7:21 AM

Infographic on mentoring  tips 

David Stapleton's curator insight, November 26, 8:55 PM
Open honest and available can you grasp a reality of constant learning and then apply in your life
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Movers shakers & policy makers - Carol Dweck, author, professor of psychology | #GrowthMindset #ModernEDU

Movers shakers & policy makers - Carol Dweck, author, professor of psychology | #GrowthMindset #ModernEDU | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
What would you say are a few of the biggest myths about growth mindset?

OK, myth No.1 is the myth that it’s all about effort, and that you instil it by praising effort. Effort is one factor that leads to learning. So the ultimate value is growth, progress, learning. And effort is one thing that leads there but there are many other things – strategies, using resources, getting advice, guidance and mentorship, and when people leave that out and just praise effort, it’s not transmitting a growth mindset. Adults have nagged children for centuries to try harder. That’s not a growth mindset, it’s an adult nagging a child to try harder!

Also, we find that when teachers think it’s just about effort and praising effort they may praise effort that isn’t even there, or that’s not effective. So if a child tries hard at something and you say ‘great job, you tried hard’, but they didn’t make progress, they didn’t advance, you’re actually conveying a fixed mindset because you’re saying ‘great effort, I didn’t really expect you to do that, and I don’t expect you to do that, so I’m trying to make you feel good about not doing it’. So we need people to understand that it’s appreciating a variety of process variables that lead to learning.

The second myth is that you can teach students a lesson on growth mindset and put a poster up in the front of the room, and that’s that, that they will have a growth mindset from then on. And we know if the teacher doesn’t then embody a growth mindset, if teachers don’t embody growth mindsets in their teaching practices, in the way that they give feedback when the child is stuck, and the way they present a new unit, in the way that they give opportunities for revision and growth of understanding – if they don’t embody that growth mindset, they are not teaching it. And in fact, if their behaviour contradicts the poster at the front of the room, then maybe they’re doing a disservice.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=carol+dweck

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=Growth+Mindset

 


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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, August 14, 1:41 PM
Carol Dweck outlines several myths about the pychology of a growth mindset.
Ian Berry's curator insight, August 14, 7:15 PM
Great reminders of several aspects what I call appreciative leadership.  "Effort is one factor that leads to learning. So the ultimate value is growth, progress, learning. And effort is one thing that leads there but there are many other things – strategies, using resources, getting advice, guidance and mentorship, and when people leave that out and just praise effort, it’s not transmitting a growth mindset."
Chris Carter's curator insight, August 14, 7:31 PM
Carol Dweck gave words and concrete research to the belief that kids can succeed, that hard work matters, and that being "smart" has more to do with focus and determination than genes. 
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Study: Snapchat and Instagram are the worst for young people

Study: Snapchat and Instagram are the worst for young people | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

A new study lends credence to what you’ve probably always suspected: social media is having a pretty negative effect on teenagers — Instagram and Snapchat being the worst culprits. The study, published today and called “Status of Mind,” was conducted by researchers for the Royal Society for Public Health in the UK. The researchers surveyed 1,479 British youths ages 14-24, asking them how they felt the different social media networks effected their mental health. They took in several factors such as body image, sleep deprivation, bullying, and self-identity.

 

The results suggest the two worst social media networks for kids are Instagram and Snapchat, as they had terrible scores for body image, bullying, and anxiety. Twitter and Facebook weren’t much better, though. YouTube was the only one that apparently inspired more positive feelings than negative ones.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/social-media-and-its-influence

 


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Gust MEES's curator insight, May 19, 3:45 PM

A new study lends credence to what you’ve probably always suspected: social media is having a pretty negative effect on teenagers — Instagram and Snapchat being the worst culprits. The study, published today and called “Status of Mind,” was conducted by researchers for the Royal Society for Public Health in the UK. The researchers surveyed 1,479 British youths ages 14-24, asking them how they felt the different social media networks effected their mental health. They took in several factors such as body image, sleep deprivation, bullying, and self-identity.

 

The results suggest the two worst social media networks for kids are Instagram and Snapchat, as they had terrible scores for body image, bullying, and anxiety. Twitter and Facebook weren’t much better, though. YouTube was the only one that apparently inspired more positive feelings than negative ones.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/social-media-and-its-influence

 

OFFREDI Didier's curator insight, May 20, 7:31 AM
Study: Snapchat and Instagram are the worst for young people | @scoopit via @knolinfos http://sco.lt/...
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Five Laws of Media and Information Literacy (MIL) | #UNESCO #ModernEDU #Infographic

Five Laws of Media and Information Literacy (MIL) | #UNESCO #ModernEDU #Infographic | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Empowerment of people through Media and Information Literacy (MIL) is an important prerequisite for fostering equitable access to information and knowledge and promoting free, independent and pluralistic media and information systems.

 

Media and Information Literacy recognizes the primary role of information and media in our everyday lives. It lies at the core of freedom of expression and information - since it empowers citizens to understand the functions of media and other information providers, to critically evaluate their content, and to make informed decisions as users and producer of information and media content.

  

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.unesco.org/new/en/communication-and-information/media-development/media-literacy/mil-as-composite-concept/

 


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Gust MEES's curator insight, February 18, 4:00 PM

Empowerment of people through Media and Information Literacy (MIL) is an important prerequisite for fostering equitable access to information and knowledge and promoting free, independent and pluralistic media and information systems.

 

Media and Information Literacy recognizes the primary role of information and media in our everyday lives. It lies at the core of freedom of expression and information - since it empowers citizens to understand the functions of media and other information providers, to critically evaluate their content, and to make informed decisions as users and producer of information and media content.

  

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.unesco.org/new/en/communication-and-information/media-development/media-literacy/mil-as-composite-concept/

 

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Effective Teacher Professional Development | #pdf | #ModernEDU #Coaching #Mentoring

Effective Teacher Professional Development | #pdf | #ModernEDU #Coaching #Mentoring | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Teacher professional learning is of increasing interest as one way to support the increasingly complex skills students need to learn in preparation for further education and work in the 21st century. Sophisticated forms of teaching are needed to develop student competencies such as deep mastery of challenging content, critical thinking, complex problem-solving,

 

effective communication and collaboration, and self-direction. In turn, effective professional development (PD) is needed to help teachers learn and refine the pedagogies required to teach these skills. However, research has shown that many PD initiatives appear ineffective in supporting changes in teacher practices and student learning. Accordingly, we set out to discover the features of effective PD.

 

This paper reviews 35 methodologically rigorous studies that have demonstrated a positive link between teacher professional development, teaching practices, and student outcomes. We identify the features of these approaches and offer rich  descriptions of these models to inform those seeking to understand the nature of the initiatives.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/?s=coaching

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/?s=professional+development

 

 


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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, June 7, 3:32 PM
Choice plays a central role in effective teacher education. Combined with exploring the data student learning (not work) provides provides useful and practical information for teaching.
Rosemary Tyrrell, Ed.D.'s curator insight, June 8, 10:59 AM
A must-read for anyone interested in faculty professional development
 
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, June 9, 4:09 AM
Effective Teacher Professional Development
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New report shows digital skills are required in all types of jobs | #EU #Europe #ICT 

The European Commission has just published the final report of the study "ICT for Work: Digital Skills in the Workplace" on the impact of information and communication technologies (ICT) on the transformation of jobs and skills.

 

 

"Conclusions and recommendations. The evidence shows that digital technologies are increasingly and extensively used across the economy. However, digital skills appear to be currently required mostly for the high-skilled and, to a lesser extent, medium-skilled employees to perform their job tasks, and are less likely to be required for the low-skilled or the unskilled (or frequently not required at all, even at basic level). These polarising trends, confirmed also by other available evidence, draws attention to the fact that a high share of workers in low-skilled occupations whichdo not require (or require to a very limited extent) digital skills. This dichotomy risks widening the digital divide, leaving a proportion of workers lagging behind and at risk of digital exclusion, who would hence benefit from specific attention.

 

"Another finding regards the availability of digital skills, which is not always sufficient to meet employers’ needs, as demonstrated by the reported existence of digital skills gaps in the workforce, even as regards basic digital skills. Different factors contribute to this situation. The speed at which workers are being provided with the right digital skills in the right locations is frequently slower than the speed at which digital technologies are evolving. As a result, digital skills are often also more subject to obsolescence. An age-related issue can also be identified, as older workers are less likely to be equipped with digital skills than younger workers. Results show as well that even if workplaces report that a proportion of their workforce is not fully proficient in carrying out tasks involving the use of digital technologies, they often do not recognise that existing in-house skills gaps impact on workplace performance and hence often do not take action to deal with the issue.

 

"Another important result regards the relationship between workplace size and access to digital technologies. For micro and small-sized workplaces, it may not be viable to invest in order to increase ICT use. Also, for those micro and small-sized employers who have a high demand for digital skills, simply allocating staff time to acquire them is both difficult (loss of productive time), and expensive (training and development programmes need to be brought in). This is less an issue for bigger employers with more available resources who can manage capacity, develop training programmes or buy them in. But it is also important to remember that some micro or small-sized companies consider that they do not need ICT at all, and therefore do not demand digital skills.

 

"Finally, the skills challenges appear highly dispersed, as different sectors have different demands, and the balance of supply and demand is different across Member States. The sectoral analysis indicates that the use of digital technologies is uneven across economic sectors, particularly concerning the types of digital technologies, their speed of penetration and also the related demand for digital skills, with some sectors clearly leading the ‘digital revolution’ and some others following at a slower pace.

 

"Conclusions and recommendations. The evidence shows that digital technologies are increasingly and extensively used across the economy. However, digital skills appear to be currently required mostly for the high-skilled and, to a lesser extent, medium-skilled employees to perform their job tasks, and are less likely to be required for the low-skilled or the unskilled (or frequently not required at all, even at basic level). These polarising trends, confirmed also by other available evidence, draws attention to the fact that a high share of workers in low-skilled occupations whichdo not require (or require to a very limited extent) digital skills. This dichotomy risks widening the digital divide, leaving a proportion of workers lagging behind and at risk of digital exclusion, who would hence benefit from specific attention.

 

"Another finding regards the availability of digital skills, which is not always sufficient to meet employers’ needs, as demonstrated by the reported existence of digital skills gaps in the workforce, even as regards basic digital skills. Different factors contribute to this situation. The speed at which workers are being provided with the right digital skills in the right locations is frequently slower than the speed at which digital technologies are evolving. As a result, digital skills are often also more subject to obsolescence. An age-related issue can also be identified, as older workers are less likely to be equipped with digital skills than younger workers. Results show as well that even if workplaces report that a proportion of their workforce is not fully proficient in carrying out tasks involving the use of digital technologies, they often do not recognise that existing in-house skills gaps impact on workplace performance and hence often do not take action to deal with the issue.

 

"Another important result regards the relationship between workplace size and access to digital technologies. For micro and small-sized workplaces, it may not be viable to invest in order to increase ICT use. Also, for those micro and small-sized employers who have a high demand for digital skills, simply allocating staff time to acquire them is both difficult (loss of productive time), and expensive (training and development programmes need to be brought in). This is less an issue for bigger employers with more available resources who can manage capacity, develop training programmes or buy them in. But it is also important to remember that some micro or small-sized companies consider that they do not need ICT at all, and therefore do not demand digital skills.

 

"Finally, the skills challenges appear highly dispersed, as different sectors have different demands, and the balance of supply and demand is different across Member States. The sectoral analysis indicates that the use of digital technologies is uneven across economic sectors, particularly concerning the types of digital technologies, their speed of penetration and also the related demand for digital skills, with some sectors clearly leading the ‘digital revolution’ and some others following at a slower pace."

 


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Kajsa Hartig's curator insight, May 24, 2:20 AM
"Basic digital skills include being able to communicate via email or social media, to create and edit documents digital documents and to search for information, or to protect personal information online."
John Rudkin's curator insight, May 24, 4:18 AM
No area of life or work is likely to be unchanged.........
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, June 9, 4:11 AM
Digital skills
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NMC Horizon Report: 2017 Higher Education Edition | #ModernEDU 

Download the NMC Horizon Report: 2017 Higher Education Edition at http://go.nmc.org/2017-he. The New Media Consortium (NMC) and EDUCAUSE Learning Initiativ

 


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Gust MEES's curator insight, February 15, 9:01 AM

Download the NMC Horizon Report: 2017 Higher Education Edition at http://go.nmc.org/2017-he. The New Media Consortium (NMC) and EDUCAUSE Learning Initiativ.

 

Oskar Almazan's curator insight, February 17, 12:35 AM
10 highlights capture the big picture themes of educational change that underpin the 18 topics:

1 Advancing progressive learning approaches requires cultural transformation.
2 Real-world skills are needed to bolster employability and workplace development.
3 Collaboration is key for scaling effective solutions.
4 Despite the proliferation of technology and online learning materials, access is still unequal.
5 Processes for assessing nuanced skills at a personal level are needed
6 Fluency in the digital realm is more than just understanding how to use technology.
7 Online, mobile, and blended learning are foregone conclusions. 
8 Learning ecosystems must be agile enough to support the practices of the future.
9 Higher education is an incubator for developing more intuitive computers.
10 Lifelong learning is the lifeblood of higher education
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Skills for Success in a Disruptive World of Work

Skills for Success in a Disruptive World of Work | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Skills young people should be learning to be prepared for a career in 2020 include:


The ability to concentrate, to focus deeply.

 

The ability to distinguish between the “noise” and the message in the ever-growing sea of information.

 

The ability to do public problem solving through cooperative work.

 

The ability to search effectively for information and to be able to discern the quality and veracity of the information one finds and then communicate these findings well.

 

Synthesizing skills (being able to bring together details from many sources).

 

The capability to be futures-minded through formal education in the practices of horizon-scanning, trends analysis and strategic foresight.”

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/05/26/what-are-the-skills-needed-from-students-in-the-future/

 


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Gilson Schwartz's curator insight, December 18, 2016 8:30 AM
Antigamente a gente falava em "profissões do futuro". Agora são os "skills" do futuro"
Víctor Ríos Ochoa's curator insight, May 27, 10:25 AM
Skills for Success in a Disruptive World of Work
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The Role of Metacognition in Learning and Achievement

The Role of Metacognition in Learning and Achievement | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Perhaps the most important reason for developing metacognition is that it can improve the application of knowledge, skills, and character qualities in realms beyond the immediate context in which they were learned. This can result in the transfer of competencies across disciplines—important for students preparing for real-life situations where clear-cut divisions of disciplines fall away and one must select competencies from the entire gamut of their experience to effectively apply them to the challenges at hand. Even within academic settings, it is valuable—and often necessary—to apply principles and methods across disciplinary lines.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Four-Dimensional+Education%3A+The+Competencies+Learn

 


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Gust MEES's curator insight, August 10, 2016 11:57 AM
Perhaps the most important reason for developing metacognition is that it can improve the application of knowledge, skills, and character qualities in realms beyond the immediate context in which they were learned. This can result in the transfer of competencies across disciplines—important for students preparing for real-life situations where clear-cut divisions of disciplines fall away and one must select competencies from the entire gamut of their experience to effectively apply them to the challenges at hand. Even within academic settings, it is valuable—and often necessary—to apply principles and methods across disciplinary lines.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Four-Dimensional+Education%3A+The+Competencies+Learn

 

 

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2 minutes to understand the potential of blockchain technology | Video Tutorials

The blockchain is a revolution with endless applications. Let’s get ready for it!

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/luxembourg-europe/?tag=Blockchain

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/luxembourg-europe/?tag=Bitcoin

 


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Fernando de la Cruz Naranjo Grisales's curator insight, April 2, 2016 7:04 AM
The blockchain is a revolution with endless applications. Let’s get ready for it!

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/luxembourg-europe/?tag=Blockchain

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/luxembourg-europe/?tag=Bitcoin

 

 

Carolina Gorosito's curator insight, April 3, 2016 8:39 AM
The blockchain is a revolution with endless applications. Let’s get ready for it!

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/luxembourg-europe/?tag=Blockchain

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/luxembourg-europe/?tag=Bitcoin

 

 

Greg Webb's curator insight, April 4, 2016 9:05 AM
The blockchain is a revolution with endless applications. Let’s get ready for it!

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/luxembourg-europe/?tag=Blockchain

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/luxembourg-europe/?tag=Bitcoin

 

 

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20 Ideas for Professional Development in the Digital Age

20 Ideas for Professional Development in the Digital Age | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
What is professional development?  It is pretty much anything that helps one develop professionally. At the heart, professional development is about growth and learning.  In the field of education, it seems like many quickly think of educational opportunities that mimic what they see in their schools. As a result, they turn professional learning and education into schooling.  The problem with that is that schooling is too limiting.  In this age, there are many other exciting and high-impact learning opportunities for teachers that extend beyond traditional notions of schooling.  When we hear the phrase “professional development,” certain practices likely come to mind, things like in-services and conferences. In the digital age, there are countless other opportunities for professional development and restricting one’s thoughts to just a few options limits our insight into what is possible for our students.  With that in mind, here is a brainstorm of 20 options available to educators today. This is far from an exhaustive list, but it is enough to start exploring the possibilities.  Feel free to suggest others in a comment to this post.

 

Learn more:

 

Professional Development: WHY EDUcators And TEACHers Can’t Catch UP THAT Quickly AND How-To Change It

 

LEARNing To LEARN For MY Professional Development | I Did It MY Way

 

 

 


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Prof. Dr. Kai Reinhardt's curator insight, March 30, 2:42 AM
Hier gibt es eine gute Sammlung an neuen Wissenstransfer-Formaten...
R's curator insight, April 6, 1:31 PM
Growth and learning beyond schooling - think outside in-service and conferences/professional workshops.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, April 25, 3:17 PM
What teachers likely need more than ever is to choose their professional learning. I use words like andragogy, forming, and learning, rather than development.
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Creativity now is as important in education as literacy and we should treat it with the same status."

Creativity now is as important in education as literacy and we should treat it with the same status." | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Creativity now is as important in education as literacy and we should treat it with the same status." - Sir Ken Robinson


Sketchnote by @sylviaduckworth


Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching?tag=Creativity


https://gustmees.wordpress.com/?s=creativity



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delta14's curator insight, February 3, 2016 10:48 AM

La creatividad es un componente esencial en el proceso de aprendizaje y logro de las competencias exigidas en el siglo XXI. La infografía de Gust MEES presenta 12 beneficios de la creatividad.

Dr. Deborah Brennan's curator insight, March 2, 2016 7:26 PM

Creativity now is as important in education as literacy and we should treat it with the same status." - Sir Ken Robinson


Sketchnote by @sylviaduckworth


Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching?tag=Creativity


https://gustmees.wordpress.com/?s=creativity


Brenda West Mccullers's curator insight, March 16, 2016 7:21 PM

Creativity now is as important in education as literacy and we should treat it with the same status." - Sir Ken Robinson


Sketchnote by @sylviaduckworth


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http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching?tag=Creativity


https://gustmees.wordpress.com/?s=creativity


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U.S. Gov't: The Internet of Things Is A Security Disaster Waiting To Happen | CyberSecurity | Privacy

U.S. Gov't: The Internet of Things Is A Security Disaster Waiting To Happen | CyberSecurity | Privacy | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is aware we live in a connected world. Americans wear Fitbits, have Nest thermostats, use automated light systems from companies like Belkin and Philips, even have televisions that predict what they want to watch. But in a new report, the FTC has a warning: Existing privacy regulations don’t really cover the Internet of Things, and the Commission doesn’t really trust device manufacturers to do the right thing—or even be aware of the risks of collecting all that data.

In a staff report issued this week, the FTC warned that makers of connected health, home, and transportation devices could potentially leave their users vulnerable to data hacks. Most of all, the FTC is concerned that private information will be used to jack up users' insurance rates or deny them access to loans.


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=wearables


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Internet+of+Things


http://www.scoop.it/t/securite-pc-et-internet/?tag=Internet+of+things


http://globaleducationandsocialmedia.wordpress.com/2014/01/21/why-is-it-a-must-to-have-basics-knowledge-of-cyber-security-in-a-connected-technology-world/



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Gust MEES's curator insight, February 9, 2015 2:23 AM
The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is aware we live in a connected world. Americans wear Fitbits, have Nest thermostats, use automated light systems from companies like Belkin and Philips, even have televisions that predict what they want to watch. But in a new report, the FTC has a warning: Existing privacy regulations don’t really cover the Internet of Things, and the Commission doesn’t really trust device manufacturers to do the right thing—or even be aware of the risks of collecting all that data.

In a staff report issued this week, the FTC warned that makers of connected health, home, and transportation devices could potentially leave their users vulnerable to data hacks. Most of all, the FTC is concerned that private information will be used to jack up users' insurance rates or deny them access to loans.


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=wearables


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Internet+of+Things


http://www.scoop.it/t/securite-pc-et-internet/?tag=Internet+of+things


http://globaleducationandsocialmedia.wordpress.com/2014/01/21/why-is-it-a-must-to-have-basics-knowledge-of-cyber-security-in-a-connected-technology-world/


deepak's curator insight, February 9, 2015 3:08 AM

उत्तर प्रदेश और किसान :

उत्तर प्रदे‌श राज्य के लिए राजनितिक सर्वे मे हमने पाया है कि अब तक उत्तर

प्रदेश में ज्यादा विकास नही हो पाया है| जैसे: कृषि,शिक्षा,उधोग आदि क्षैत्र में|

यह राज्य कृषि उत्पादन मे भारत मे सर्व श्रेठ है| यहाँ की भूमि बहुँत उपजाऊ है

जिससे हमे बहुँत फसल प्राप्त होती है जैसे गैहू, धान ,सरसो ,दाले आदि| जिनहे

हम विदेश में निर्यात करे तो अच्छा धन कमा सकते हैं पर इस राज्य में शासन

करने वाले इसे कम कीमत पर खरीद कर अच्छी कीमत पर बेच देते है | लाभ

राशि यहाँ के लोग नही बल्कि यहाँ की भ्रष्ट सरकार की साहयता से पूंजीपति उठा

लेते है

जिस्से किसान अच्छी कीमत नही कमा पाते है और किसान आर्थिक रूप से ग्रस्त

होते जा रहे है

उत्तर प्रदेश की इन सभी कमियो को मध्यनजर रखते हुए भारतीय जनता पार्टी

विकास के लिए कुछ जरूरी कदम उठाएगी |

1. सभी किसानो के लिए कृषि धन योजना खाते खोले जाएँगे | जिससे वह

गन्ना अदि फसल का भुगतान अपने खाते में पा सकते है |

2. किसानो के लिए लोन की सुविधा कम दर पर रखी जाएंगी | जिस्से वह

ज्यादा समय में आसानी से चुका सके |

3. फसल के बारे मे शिक्षा प्रदान करने के लिए कृषि विशेषज्ञयो को भेजा जाय

जाएंगा |

4. शिक्षा का स्तर बाल व बालिकाओ का निगमन साक्षरता की ओर होगा

जिस्मे नए प्राइमरी व इंटर तक के स्कूल खोले जायंगे |

5. सभी व्यावसायिक को व्यवसाय प्रदान किये जायंगे वो भी एक अच्छी प्रति

दिन कीमत पर |

6. उत्तर प्रदेश वासियों को कम यूनिट दर पर बिजली परदान की जाएगी |

संजय सिंह जी को भारतीय जनता पार्टी दुआर जेवर छेत्र के लिए चुने गये है

जो इस छेत्र मे काफी सुधार करने के इच्छुक है |

1. किसानो का गन्ना तथा आदि कृषि सम्बन्धी मुद्दा सुलझेंगे |

2. किसानो को आर्थिक सहायताए देंगे |

3. जेवर में सड़क सम्बन्धि तथा आदि कार्य कराएंगे |

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Design Thinking in Education | #Harvard #ModernEDU #ModernLEARNing #Design

Design Thinking in Education | #Harvard #ModernEDU #ModernLEARNing #Design | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Design Thinking is a mindset and approach to learning, collaboration, and problem solving. In practice, the design process is a structured framework for identifying challenges, gathering information, generating potential solutions, refining ideas, and testing solutions. Design Thinking can be flexibly implemented; serving equally well as a framework for a course design or a roadmap for an activity or group project.

Download the HGSE Design Thinking in Education infographic to learn more about what Design Thinking is and why it is powerful in the classroom.

 

Download the Infographic:

 

https://tll.gse.harvard.edu/files/hgsetll/files/designthinkingeducation.pdf

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=Design-Thinking

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/10/03/design-the-learning-of-your-learners-students-ideas/

 


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Gust MEES's curator insight, November 18, 6:21 PM
Design Thinking is a mindset and approach to learning, collaboration, and problem solving. In practice, the design process is a structured framework for identifying challenges, gathering information, generating potential solutions, refining ideas, and testing solutions. Design Thinking can be flexibly implemented; serving equally well as a framework for a course design or a roadmap for an activity or group project.

Download the HGSE Design Thinking in Education infographic to learn more about what Design Thinking is and why it is powerful in the classroom.

 

Download the Infographic:

 

https://tll.gse.harvard.edu/files/hgsetll/files/designthinkingeducation.pdf

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=Design-Thinking

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/10/03/design-the-learning-of-your-learners-students-ideas/

 

Rubiel's curator insight, November 20, 11:18 AM
Creativity does not just occur in the arts, it happens within engineering design, policy making, problem solving, game strategizing, and especially lesson planning. And it’s a process that takes many forms, from conceiving an idea to shaping thoughts into something tangible to polishing a draft. During the process, there are likely many redos, as each draft and conversation inspires a new take on the idea, which may sharpen the picture of one’s creation.
Karen Mejia's curator insight, November 29, 2:52 PM
This post mentions that nowadays it is important to design thinking in education because it promotes collaboration, help students to develop their skill on solving problems, and learning. 
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Video: Watch John Hattie's Keynote On Collaborative Impact - VISIBLE LEARNING | #ModernEDU

Video: Watch John Hattie's Keynote On Collaborative Impact - VISIBLE LEARNING | #ModernEDU | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Professor John Hattie gave a keynote presentation on “Collaborative Impact” in front of school leaders and principals at Cognition Education’s “Collaborative Impact: Research & Practice Conference 2017”. Watch the video to get some important updates on the Visible Learning story. 

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=John+HATTIE

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=modern-education

 


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Gust MEES's curator insight, August 11, 12:00 PM

Professor John Hattie gave a keynote presentation on “Collaborative Impact” in front of school leaders and principals at Cognition Education’s “Collaborative Impact: Research & Practice Conference 2017”. Watch the video to get some important updates on the Visible Learning story. 

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=John+HATTIE

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=modern-education

 

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Growth Mindset: A Driving Philosophy, Not Just a Tool

Growth Mindset: A Driving Philosophy, Not Just a Tool | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
It's important to recognize that a growth mindset is an overall paradigm for personal development rather than a pedagogical tool for measuring academic accomplishment.

 

5 Growth Mindset Practices

In their groundbreaking book, Professional Learning Communities at Work, Richard DuFour and Robert Eaker say it clearly when pointing out the issue that comes about when change initiatives are considered "a task to complete rather than an ongoing process." If we really want to improve our schools, our work, and the education of our students, we can do so by adopting a new mindset -- for everyone -- that would include:

  1. Being humble enough to accept that there are things about ourselves and our practices that can improve
  2. Becoming part of professional teams that value constructive critique instead of criticism
  3. Treating setbacks as formative struggles within the learning process instead of summative failures
  4. Realizing the restrictive role that timelines can play in reaching high standards, and using foundational philosophies such as Universal Design for Learning (UDL) to map systems so that everyone's growth is supported
  5. Create flexible grouping at all times so that nobody's trapped in any one course level or particular type of work.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=Growth+Mindset

 

 


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Dr. Deborah Brennan's curator insight, July 28, 6:43 PM
Growth mindset applies not just to students, but to teachers and administrators as well.  We must support all individuals as they develop and grow.
Kelly Christopherson's curator insight, August 2, 2:45 PM
Growth mindset is about an approach to life not another tool for teaching. Teachers can shift away from this tool-approach by looking at growth mindset as a way to develop as a person not get better grades. 
Tina Jameson's curator insight, August 3, 6:47 PM
An interesting read - worth reflecting on what we mean by a 'growth mindset'.
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Teaching 21st Century Skills For 21st Century Success Requires An Ecosystem Approach | #eSkills #ICT

Teaching 21st Century Skills For 21st Century Success Requires An Ecosystem Approach | #eSkills #ICT | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
It is almost universally acknowledged that in order to succeed in the 21st century, students must learn much more than the “three Rs” and basic computer competency.

 

The term “21st century skills” is used often in educational circles to refer to a range of abilities and competencies that go beyond what has traditionally been taught in the classroom, including problem solving, communication, collaboration, creativity and innovation. Others define the term as “information literacy, media literacy, and information, communication and technology literacy.”

 

More importantly, students need these skills because employers across a huge variety of industries increasingly demand them. A recent McKinsey report indicated that close to 40 percent of employers could not find people with the right skills while 60 percent “complain[ed] of a lack of preparation.” Even jobs that were once considered vocationalsuch as welding, petroleum production, and even factory work, are now high tech, and require specialized knowledge that includes not only a robust science background and familiarity with the computerized machinery that keeps heavy industry humming, but also critical thinking and collaboration skills. In other words, 21st century job growth is outpacing our ability to develop a prepared workforce, making it more critical than ever to teach these skills.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/07/19/learning-path-for-professional-21st-century-learning-by-ict-practice/

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/10/29/if-i-would-own-a-company-what-skills-would-i-expect-from-my-workers-in-21st-century/

 


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tina miller's curator insight, July 20, 7:32 AM
communication

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, July 25, 6:02 AM
Teaching 21st Century Skills For 21st Century Success Requires An Ecosystem Approach
Chris Carter's curator insight, July 25, 7:05 PM
I am convinced now that we cannot "put new wine into old wineskins." We need to fundamentally rethink how we conceptualize "school." Bolting on new parts to the old system runs into the problem of the inertia of the old. There is so much to say here. We came into the 21st Century with a model of education that is, practically speaking, a "production" model where teachers stay in front of students and their productivity is measures by hours in front of students multiplied by number of students. The more hours and the more students, the more productive. My school is willing to explore a new paradigm, one in which teaching is modeling how to learn and guiding students toward a lifetime and lifestyle of learning . Such a mindset naturally leads to relational approaches. It is no so much about the numbers, but about learners seeing teachers as learners and learning "guild" leaders, too.
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Six Ways the Teacher's Role is Changing | #LEARNing2LEARN #ModernEDU

Six Ways the Teacher's Role is Changing | #LEARNing2LEARN #ModernEDU | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
During this time of significant educational change, we are forced to ask ourselves, what is the role of the teacher?

Teachers continue to be central to learning, but the role is changing significantly. Our children still need to develop real skills and real knowledge, but they also need to be self-reliant, resilient, and fully capable of re-inventing themselves. This means students must learn how to self-direct their learning.

So if students are self-directing their learning, what's the role of the teacher?

Teachers build the curriculum/lessons with the individual student based on his/her needs and interests rather than move through a fixed curriculum en masse.


Teachers provide the experiences and tools to access new knowledge in specific areas of interest as facilitators of individual pathways, rather than being a provider of the content or expert in one or every area,Teachers become experts in how people learn, not only in teaching.


Teachers support a community of learners in teams, possibly of multiple ages, rather than alone in classrooms with fixed grades of students.


Teachers have more autonomy over their daily schedule, and can be flexible to adjust their schedules to support student needs.


Teachers provide opportunities for real-world, connected, practical learning rather than isolated academics.
These are the types of changes in the teacher's role that are fundamental to developing students who are capable of independent learning and reinvention in a rapidly changing world.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2013/05/25/so-whats-the-change-for-teachers-in-21st-century-education/

 


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Jan Swanepoel's curator insight, May 26, 7:31 PM
During a time of significant educational change, this article addresses the contemporary question: "What is the real role of the teacher?" Teachers continue to be central to learning and students still need to develop real skills and real knowledge, however 21st century learners also need to be self-reliant, resilient, and fully capable of re-inventing themselves, meaning that students must learn how to self-direct their learning. Please visit my blog at http://mymathsrules.weebly.com for my extended curator's insight.
PEEP Matisse's curator insight, May 29, 4:21 AM
On est loin des fondamentaux de l'Education Nationale, mais on peut rêver
Sarah's curator insight, June 4, 8:25 PM
This is a short article on the ways that teachers' roles are changing. It is important to note that teachers are not becoming obsolete, but are just as important as ever. Teachers are here to facilitate learning and assisting the students in becoming resilient, self directed and capable learners.
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3 Ways Exponential Technologies are Impacting the Future of Learning

3 Ways Exponential Technologies are Impacting the Future of Learning | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Exponential technologies have a tendency to move from a deceptively slow pace of development to a disruptively fast pace. We often disregard or don’t notice technologies in the deceptive growth phase, until they begin changing the way we live and do business.

 

Driven by information technologies, products and services become digitized, dematerialized, demonetized and/or democratized and enter a phase of exponential growth.

 

Nicole Wilson, who was Singularity University’s vice president of faculty and curriculum until last year, believes education technology is currently in a phase of deceptive growth, and we are seeing the beginning of how exponential technologies are impacting 1) what we need to learn, 2) how we view schooling and society and 3) how we will teach and learn in the future.

 

[Gust MEES] Simply put, as WE (#Schools) DON'T know WHAT THAT world would be, WE SHOULD prepare the #students #LEARNers for <===> #LEARNing2LEARN to become #LifeLongLEARNing persons! Please check my #blog post <===> https://gustmees.wordpress.com/.../teaching-was.../

 

<===> #ModernEDU #Coaching

 


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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, March 22, 2:36 AM
3 Ways Exponential Technologies are Impacting the Future of Learning
Gabrielle's curator insight, April 3, 12:27 AM

Future of education 

Magaly Siméon's curator insight, April 9, 4:01 AM

Very interesting subject to be considered and discussed. I will disclose the post to my contacts and subscribers in http://www.quanticaconsultoria.com

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Learning and earning: Lifelong learning is becoming an economic imperative | The Economist

Learning and earning: Lifelong learning is becoming an economic imperative | The Economist | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Lifelong learning is becoming an economic imperative

Technological change demands stronger and more continuous connections between education and employment, says Andrew Palmer. The faint outlines of such a system are now emerging.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Life-Long-Learning

 


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Gust MEES's curator insight, January 20, 3:26 AM
Lifelong learning is becoming an economic imperative

Technological change demands stronger and more continuous connections between education and employment, says Andrew Palmer. The faint outlines of such a system are now emerging.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Life-Long-Learning

 

siblingsnonstop's comment, January 20, 11:10 PM
Nice
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, January 23, 3:14 AM
Learning and earning
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How The Activity Learning Theory Works

How The Activity Learning Theory Works | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
How The Activity Learning Theory Works 

Vygotsky’s earlier concept of mediation, which encompassed learning alongside others (Zone of Proximal Development) and through interaction with artifacts, was the basis for Engeström’s version of Activity Theory (known as Scandinavian Activity Theory). Engeström’s approach was to explain human thought processes not simply on the basis of the individual, but in the wider context of the individual’s interactions within the social world through artifacts, and specifically in situations where activities were being produced.

In Activity Theory people (actors) use external tools (e.g. hammer, computer, car) and internal tools (e.g. plans, cognitive maps) to achieve their goals. In the social world there are many artifacts, which are seen not only as objects, but also as things that are embedded within culture, with the result that every object has cultural and/or social significance.

Tools (which can limit or enable) can also be brought to bear on the mediation of social interaction, and they influence both the behavior of the actors (those who use the tools) and also the social structure within which the actors exist (the environment, tools, artifacts). For further reading, here is Engeström’s own overview of 3 Generations of Activity Theory development. The first figure shows Second Generation AT as it is usually presented in the literature.

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manukadroopy's comment, August 30, 2016 5:36 AM
Thats interesting
Dr. Theresa Kauffman's curator insight, August 30, 2016 8:46 PM
This is a fascinating take on Vygotsky's work applied to modern technology. What do you think?
Jaydin Nies's curator insight, September 19, 2016 2:47 PM

Many times when we learn we use many tools. They may be our minds or they may be outside objects. This is how we put them together and use it for the better. 

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Sir Ken Robinson: How to Create a Culture For Valuable Learning

Sir Ken Robinson: How to Create a Culture For Valuable Learning | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
that it’s important for young people to become economically independent and self-sufficient. But to do that, he argues, they shouldn’t all learn the same thing. Instead, they should be learning to be adaptable, to be innovative, to flow with change, to collaborate and other globalized skills that will apply to whatever area of work they are passionate about pursuing. An education can help expose students to different life paths and support them in finding their passions, while giving them the transferable skills to attack any problem.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Sir-Ken-Robinson

 


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David W. Deeds's curator insight, August 20, 2016 6:49 PM

Good stuff! Thanks to Jim Lerman.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, February 6, 1:44 AM
Learning
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Designing Next-Generation Universities | Higher Ed Beta

Designing Next-Generation Universities | Higher Ed Beta | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Learning by Doing
Education, like life itself, should not be a spectator sport. Merely listening or even reading may create the illusion of learning, but without active engagement, retention of course material, or the ability to apply it, is laughably low. Students who engage in hands-on activities understand concepts more deeply and remember them more accurately.
 
Project-based, case-based, and team-based learning and problem-solving are activity-based approaches to teaching and learning, allowing students to become creators of knowledge rather than mere recipients of knowledge.
 
Students might annotate a text or play or work of art, map and analyze data, visually represent change over time, document a neighborhood or community. The web can then make student projects and research publicly accessible.
 
By learning by doing can take even richer forms. A solver community brings together students and faculty to “crowdsource” innovative solutions to the critical challenges of our time. Tackling a real-world challenge is a proven way to nurture a community of engage, creative learners. One of the broader goals is to transform a class of students into a knowledge network, an ongoing community that can continue to partner and share expertise and insights.
 
Then there are maker spaces. These are innovation greenhouses, incubators, or accelerators where innovators – whether faculty, students, staff, or others from outside the campus – can work individually or collaborative on projects in a supportive environment.
 
A new kind of student populates many campuses defined not by demographic characteristics, but by mindset and aspirations. Extraordinarily entrepreneurial, these students, in their spare time, create apps, found start-ups, and devise creative solutions to a host of pressing environmental, health, and technology problems.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/07/19/learning-path-for-professional-21st-century-learning-by-ict-practice/

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/10/03/design-the-learning-of-your-learners-students-ideas/

 

 


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Fernando de la Cruz Naranjo Grisales's curator insight, April 2, 2016 7:05 AM

Learning by Doing
Education, like life itself, should not be a spectator sport. Merely listening or even reading may create the illusion of learning, but without active engagement, retention of course material, or the ability to apply it, is laughably low. Students who engage in hands-on activities understand concepts more deeply and remember them more accurately.
 
Project-based, case-based, and team-based learning and problem-solving are activity-based approaches to teaching and learning, allowing students to become creators of knowledge rather than mere recipients of knowledge.
 
Students might annotate a text or play or work of art, map and analyze data, visually represent change over time, document a neighborhood or community. The web can then make student projects and research publicly accessible.
 
By learning by doing can take even richer forms. A solver community brings together students and faculty to “crowdsource” innovative solutions to the critical challenges of our time. Tackling a real-world challenge is a proven way to nurture a community of engage, creative learners. One of the broader goals is to transform a class of students into a knowledge network, an ongoing community that can continue to partner and share expertise and insights.
 
Then there are maker spaces. These are innovation greenhouses, incubators, or accelerators where innovators – whether faculty, students, staff, or others from outside the campus – can work individually or collaborative on projects in a supportive environment.
 
A new kind of student populates many campuses defined not by demographic characteristics, but by mindset and aspirations. Extraordinarily entrepreneurial, these students, in their spare time, create apps, found start-ups, and devise creative solutions to a host of pressing environmental, health, and technology problems.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/07/19/learning-path-for-professional-21st-century-learning-by-ict-practice/

 

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/10/03/design-the-learning-of-your-learners-students-ideas/

 

Fernando de la Cruz Naranjo Grisales's curator insight, April 2, 2016 7:38 AM

Learning by Doing
Education, like life itself, should not be a spectator sport. Merely listening or even reading may create the illusion of learning, but without active engagement, retention of course material, or the ability to apply it, is laughably low. Students who engage in hands-on activities understand concepts more deeply and remember them more accurately.
 
Project-based, case-based, and team-based learning and problem-solving are activity-based approaches to teaching and learning, allowing students to become creators of knowledge rather than mere recipients of knowledge.
 
Students might annotate a text or play or work of art, map and analyze data, visually represent change over time, document a neighborhood or community. The web can then make student projects and research publicly accessible.
 
By learning by doing can take even richer forms. A solver community brings together students and faculty to “crowdsource” innovative solutions to the critical challenges of our time. Tackling a real-world challenge is a proven way to nurture a community of engage, creative learners. One of the broader goals is to transform a class of students into a knowledge network, an ongoing community that can continue to partner and share expertise and insights.
 
Then there are maker spaces. These are innovation greenhouses, incubators, or accelerators where innovators – whether faculty, students, staff, or others from outside the campus – can work individually or collaborative on projects in a supportive environment.
 
A new kind of student populates many campuses defined not by demographic characteristics, but by mindset and aspirations. Extraordinarily entrepreneurial, these students, in their spare time, create apps, found start-ups, and devise creative solutions to a host of pressing environmental, health, and technology problems.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/07/19/learning-path-for-professional-21st-century-learning-by-ict-practice/

 

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/10/03/design-the-learning-of-your-learners-students-ideas/

 

Bárbara Mónica Pérez Moo's curator insight, April 4, 2016 10:43 PM

Learning by Doing
Education, like life itself, should not be a spectator sport. Merely listening or even reading may create the illusion of learning, but without active engagement, retention of course material, or the ability to apply it, is laughably low. Students who engage in hands-on activities understand concepts more deeply and remember them more accurately.
 
Project-based, case-based, and team-based learning and problem-solving are activity-based approaches to teaching and learning, allowing students to become creators of knowledge rather than mere recipients of knowledge.
 
Students might annotate a text or play or work of art, map and analyze data, visually represent change over time, document a neighborhood or community. The web can then make student projects and research publicly accessible.
 
By learning by doing can take even richer forms. A solver community brings together students and faculty to “crowdsource” innovative solutions to the critical challenges of our time. Tackling a real-world challenge is a proven way to nurture a community of engage, creative learners. One of the broader goals is to transform a class of students into a knowledge network, an ongoing community that can continue to partner and share expertise and insights.
 
Then there are maker spaces. These are innovation greenhouses, incubators, or accelerators where innovators – whether faculty, students, staff, or others from outside the campus – can work individually or collaborative on projects in a supportive environment.
 
A new kind of student populates many campuses defined not by demographic characteristics, but by mindset and aspirations. Extraordinarily entrepreneurial, these students, in their spare time, create apps, found start-ups, and devise creative solutions to a host of pressing environmental, health, and technology problems.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/07/19/learning-path-for-professional-21st-century-learning-by-ict-practice/

 

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/10/03/design-the-learning-of-your-learners-students-ideas/

 

Rescooped by Jim Lerman from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

Big Data Threat Landscape — ENISA

Big Data Threat Landscape — ENISA | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
This Threat Landscape and Good Practice Guide for Big Data provides an overview of the current state of security in the Big Data area. In particular, it identifies Big Data assets, analyses exposure of these assets to threats, lists threat agents, takes into account published vulnerabilities and risks, and points to emerging good practices and new researches in the field. To this aim, ongoing community-driven efforts and publicly available information have been taken into account.


Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Big+Data...



Via Gust MEES
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Gust MEES's curator insight, February 3, 2016 12:04 PM
This Threat Landscape and Good Practice Guide for Big Data provides an overview of the current state of security in the Big Data area. In particular, it identifies Big Data assets, analyses exposure of these assets to threats, lists threat agents, takes into account published vulnerabilities and risks, and points to emerging good practices and new researches in the field. To this aim, ongoing community-driven efforts and publicly available information have been taken into account.


Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Big+Data...


Rescooped by Jim Lerman from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

Sketch Note: How to Influence Without Authority | Leadership | EQ

Sketch Note: How to Influence Without Authority | Leadership | EQ | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

My work in corporate quality functions in the past involved influencing cross-functional teams (as an internal consultant) on processes and methods when I had no direct reporting relationships with them. I knew that only technical expertise was not enough and I wished I had some guidance on how to.


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=EQ


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=LeaderShip



Via Gust MEES
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Gust MEES's curator insight, December 17, 2015 8:49 AM

My work in corporate quality functions in the past involved influencing cross-functional teams (as an internal consultant) on processes and methods when I had no direct reporting relationships with them. I knew that only technical expertise was not enough and I wished I had some guidance on how to.


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=EQ


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=LeaderShip


Patricia Clason's curator insight, March 12, 2016 8:38 AM

Valuable tips for all business relationships!!


Emeric Nectoux's curator insight, April 24, 2016 3:50 AM

In her post: “How to Influence Without Authority”, Jesse Lyn Stoner offers useful guidance on the what she calls as “8 Portals of Influence”. Whether you lead backed by a formal authority or you lead without a title, these ideas should help you build influence.

 

    1. Character – Your own character is your greatest source of influence.
    2. Expertise – Do you have content knowledge and experience? Are you a thought leader?
    3. Information – Do you have access to valuable information?
    4. Connectedness – Do you form close relationships with people? Do they enjoy working with you? 
    5. Social intelligence – Do you offer insight into interpersonal issues that interfere with work and help facilitate resolution of issues? P
    6. Network – Do you put the right people in touch with each other? 
    7. Collaboration – Do you seek win-win solutions, unify coalitions and build community? 
    8. Funding – Do you have access to financial support?