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Making a Crypto Utopia in Puerto Rico :: NY Times

Making a Crypto Utopia in Puerto Rico :: NY Times | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

They call what they are building Puertopia. But then someone told them, apparently in all seriousness, that it translates to “eternal boy playground” in Latin. So they are changing the name: They will call it Sol.

"Dozens of entrepreneurs, made newly wealthy by blockchain and cryptocurrencies, are heading en masse to Puerto Rico this winter. They are selling their homes and cars in California and establishing residency on the Caribbean island in hopes of avoiding what they see as onerous state and federal taxes on their growing fortunes, some of which now reach into the billions of dollars.

"And these men — because they are almost exclusively men — have a plan for what to do with the wealth: They want to build a crypto utopia, a new city where the money is virtual and the contracts are all public, to show the rest of the world what a crypto future could look like. Blockchain, a digital ledger that forms the basis of virtual currencies, has the potential to reinvent society — and the Puertopians want to prove it.

"For more than a year, the entrepreneurs had been searching for the best location. After Hurricane Maria decimated Puerto Rico’s infrastructure in September and the price of cryptocurrencies began to soar, they saw an opportunity and felt a sense of urgency."

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

 

Truly, truly amazing!

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:: The 4th Era ::
Impact of the internet age on human culture and K-20 education policy/administration
Curated by Jim Lerman
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Introducing this work

Introducing this work | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

For the purposes of this site, the history of human interaction with information may be divided into 4 eras. The first (spoken) era ended with the invention of writing around 3000-4000 BC. The second era ended with the invention of the printing press in 1440. The third era ended, and the fourth began, with the invention of the Internet (depending how one defines its operational beginning) somewhere between 1969 and 1982. We now exist early, but decidedly, in the fourth era.

 

All readers may not agree with this interpretation of the history of information, especially with the division and numbering of the eras. That is not the main point. Rather, it is that humankind presently exists in an era distinctly different from the one that preceded it -- that in fact, this new era is accompanied with, and characterized by, a new - and quite different - information landscape. This new Internet information landscape will challenge, disrupt, and overpower the print-oriented one that came before it. It will not completely obliterate that which preceded it, but it will render it to a subsidiary, rather than primary, level of influence.

 

Just as the printing press altered humanity's relationship with information, thereby resulting in massive restructuring of political, religious, economic, social, educational, cultural, scientific, and other realms of life; so too will the advance of digital technology occasion analogous transformations in the corresponding universe of present and future human activity.

 

This site will concern itself primarily with how K-20 education in the US, and the people who comprise its constituencies, may be affected by this transformative movement from one era to the next. All ideas considered here appear, to me at least, to impact the learning enterprise in some way. Accordingly, this work looks at the present and the future through a lens that is predominantly, but far from entirely, a digital one. -JL

 

Opinions expressed, scooped, or copied in this Scoop.it topic are my own, or a result of my own judgment, and should in no way be understood to reflect those of my employer.

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Margaret Waage's comment, June 20, 2013 12:43 PM
Jim - I like your perspective. Great subject matter here!
Margaret Waage's comment, June 20, 2013 12:46 PM
Shared via LinkedIn!
Azania Nduli-AmaZulu UbuntuPsychology.ORG's curator insight, July 8, 2013 11:24 PM

Beautiful!

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Students Learn From People They Love - The New York Times

Students Learn From People They Love - The New York Times | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"That unplanned moment illustrated for me the connection between emotional relationships and learning. We used to have this top-down notion that reason was on a teeter-totter with emotion. If you wanted to be rational and think well, you had to suppress those primitive gremlins, the emotions. Teaching consisted of dispassionately downloading knowledge into students’ brains.

"Then work by cognitive scientists like Antonio Damasio showed us that emotion is not the opposite of reason; it’s essential to reason. Emotions assign value to things. If you don’t know what you want, you can’t make good decisions.

"Furthermore, emotions tell you what to pay attention to, care about and remember. It’s hard to work through difficulty if your emotions aren’t engaged. Information is plentiful, but motivation is scarce.

"That early neuroscience breakthrough reminded us that a key job of a school is to give students new things to love — an exciting field of study, new friends. It reminded us that what teachers really teach is themselves — their contagious passion for their subjects and students. It reminded us that children learn from people they love, and that love in this context means willing the good of another, and offering active care for the whole person.

"Over the last several years our understanding of the relationship between emotion and learning has taken off. My impression is that neuroscientists today spend less time trying to locate exactly where in the brain things happen and more time trying to understand the different neural networks and what activates them."

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

 

It has been my experience and opinion that many students, and particularly historically underserved students, learn FOR their teacher. If they care for their teacher, they give their attention and engagement willingly. If they don't care for their teacher, they tune out and sometimes act out. The most fundamental building block of school is relationships. It's gratifying to see that neuroscience research provides support for this position.

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Michael Bloomberg Donates $1.8 Billion To Johns Hopkins University For Financial Aid

Michael Bloomberg Donates $1.8 Billion To Johns Hopkins University For Financial Aid | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Billionaire philanthropist Michael Bloomberg is donating a record $1.8 billion to his alma mater, Johns Hopkins University, to offer more financial aid to low- and middle-income students.

“I want to be sure that the school that gave me a chance will be able to permanently open that same door of opportunity for others,” Bloomberg, former mayor of New York, wrote in a New York Times op-ed Sunday. The donation, apparently the largest ever to a higher education institution, will allow Johns Hopkins to be permanently “need-blind,” meaning that applicants’ financial situations are only looked at after they’re accepted. "

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You Deserve Privacy Online. Here’s How You Could Actually Get It  (by Tim Cook) :: TIME

You Deserve Privacy Online. Here’s How You Could Actually Get It  (by Tim Cook) :: TIME | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

In 2019, it’s time to stand up for the right to privacy—yours, mine, all of ours. Consumers shouldn’t have to tolerate another year of companies irresponsibly amassing huge user profiles, data breaches that seem out of control and the vanishing ability to control our own digital lives.

"This problem is solvable—it isn’t too big, too challenging or too late. Innovation, breakthrough ideas and great features can go hand in hand with user privacy—and they must. Realizing technology’s potential depends on it.

"That’s why I and others are calling on the U.S. Congress to pass comprehensive federal privacy legislation—a landmark package of reforms that protect and empower the consumer. Last year, before a global body of privacy regulators, I laid out four principles that I believe should guide legislation:


"First, the right to have personal data minimized. Companies should challenge themselves to strip identifying information from customer data or avoid collecting it in the first place. Second, the right to knowledge—to know what data is being collected and why. Third, the right to access. Companies should make it easy for you to access, correct and delete your personal data. And fourth, the right to data security, without which trust is impossible."

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Tim Cook: It's time for the shadowy world of data brokers to end - Fast Company

Tim Cook: It's time for the shadowy world of data brokers to end - Fast Company | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Many people I’ve spoken to have a pretty good understanding that companies like Facebook and Google have a massive amount of data on them. And most of those people also understand that companies like Facebook and Google package this data about them and sell it to advertisers. But few people I’ve talked to know that Facebook, Google, and other companies also sell your data to third-party data brokers.

Via John Evans
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National Commission on Social, Emotional, and Academic Development Releases Final Report

National Commission on Social, Emotional, and Academic Development Releases Final Report | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"We invite you to share the livestream link with friends and colleagues and to visit NationAtHope.org where you will find the full report and its complementary research, practice, and policy briefs. The website also features an expansive collection of resources―from videos that show how schools and classrooms across the country are supporting their students’ social, emotional, and academic growth to research briefs that examine the evidence behind supporting the whole learner."

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

 

Rich collection of resources on this important topic. The Final Report is the culmination of several years' work and a singular attempt to reach consensus in the field of SEL.

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A Rubric for Evaluating E-Learning Tools in Higher Education | EDUCAUSE

A Rubric for Evaluating E-Learning Tools in Higher Education | EDUCAUSE | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"...we firmly believe that instructors should be the ultimate decision-makers in selecting the tools that will work for their courses and their learners. Thus, we saw an opportunity to develop a framework that would assist with the predictive evaluation of e-learning tools—a framework that could be used by non-tech experts and applied in a variety of learning contexts to help draw their attention to the cogent aspects of evaluating any e-learning tool. To address this need, we created the Rubric for E-Learning Tool Evaluation.

"At our institution, Western University, the Rubric for E-Learning Tool Evaluation is currently being utilized in two ways. First, educational developers are using the rubric to review the tools and technologies profiled on the eLearning Toolkit, a university online resource intended to help instructors discover and meaningfully integrate technologies into their teaching. Second, we have shared our rubric with instructors and staff so that they can independently review tools of interest to them. These uses of the framework are key to our intended purpose for the rubric: to serve as a guide for instructors and staff in their assessment and selection of e-learning tools through a multidimensional evaluation of functional, technical, and pedagogical aspects."

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How To Accelerate Experiential Learning At Work - People Development

How To Accelerate Experiential Learning At Work - People Development | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
There are 3 strategies you can employ to accelerate experience and give employees a valuable edge. Based on experiential learning techniques

Via The People Development Network, stevebatch, Jim Lerman
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Exception or Extinction as an Administrator: It Is Yours to Choose

Exception or Extinction as an Administrator: It Is Yours to Choose | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
In order to help you maintain value, you need to regularly engage with classroom teachers, have discussions of their troubles and their triumphs with their students, and learn how various programs are impacting their classroom instruction. Here are a few strategies and tools that you can use to keep in touch with classroom teachers so you can be the exception to the rule of becoming extinct.
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How to Move From Digital Substitution to ‘Deeper Learning’ :: EdSurge News

How to Move From Digital Substitution to ‘Deeper Learning’ :: EdSurge News | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Excerpt from interview with Scott McLeod

 

Tell me one story that you’ve seen, perhaps one school that you’ve worked with that has made this journey. What were they like and where did they go?

"So one of my favorite schools is called Iowa Big. It’s in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.Students spend half their day at Iowa Big and half the day at their mothership high school. When they’re at Iowa Big, they’re working on projects that come from their community, such as local nonprofits, government agencies or local companies that basically say, we have things that we want to get done. Projects that we want to accomplish. They then put some high school youth on these tasks. . And it’s in this amazing place where kids are redesigning schools with local architects. They’re building aquatic drones. They’re creating utensils for amputees. They’re creating the community’s first entrepreneurship conference for girls and women. I mean, just all these sorts of authentic community projects where the kids get a chance to do real-world work, side by side, with people in the community, as a complement to their more ordinary school experiences at their mothership high school."

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How Does a College Grad End Up at a For-Profit Technical School? It’s All About the Job Market — and the Value of a Bachelor’s Degree | The 74

How Does a College Grad End Up at a For-Profit Technical School? It’s All About the Job Market — and the Value of a Bachelor’s Degree | The 74 | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"With a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Rutgers University, New Jersey’s flagship public college, 22-year-old Rachel Van Dyks expected to have a good job by now. A professional job with a proper salary and benefits would enable her to move out of her grandfather’s house, where she lives with her parents and her brother. Instead, the 2017 graduate works 46 hours per week at two jobs — scooping maple walnut ice cream at the local ice cream parlor and taking orders at a high-end steakhouse — while paying for an associate degree in cardiovascular sonography at a for-profit technical school.

"Van Dyks is not alone, according to Anthony Carnevale, director of Georgetown University’s Center on Education and the Workforce. A majority of college graduates require additional education in order to qualify for a good-paying job, Carnevale said — though many might not find that out until after commencement exercises are over. While colleges are expanding their career development offices and providing students with opportunities for internships, few students take advantage of those resources. For those young graduates, the realities of the job market come as a surprise.

"The traditional path is to pursue a master’s degree, but many college graduates, like Van Dyks, are abandoning the academic track and following a path that some might view as going backward: enrolling at a community college or a for-profit technical school and getting an associate degree or industry certification, specifically to qualify for a job. According to Carnevale, 14 percent of bachelor’s degree holders go that route."

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ProWritingAid - the best grammar checker, style editor, and editing tool in one package.

ProWritingAid - the best grammar checker, style editor, and editing tool in one package. | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Your personal writing coach. A grammar checker, style editor, and writing mentor in one package. The best writing depends on much more than just correct grammar. You need an editing tool that also highlights style issues and compares your writing to the best writers in your genre.
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Humanities for All: Explore the Publicly Engaged Humanities!

Humanities for All: Explore the Publicly Engaged Humanities! | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Via The Scout Report

 

"Across the United States, universities and colleges have been partnering with cultural institutions such as museums, historical societies, and state and local agencies to create publicly-engaged humanities projects. Humanities for All, a new initiative of the National Humanities Alliance Foundation, provides a database of over 1,500 public humanities programs throughout the country, showcasing a "wide range of humanities projects that engage with diverse publics as audiences and as partners." Visitors can search the database by keyword and filter the projects by the type of higher education institution, type of community partner, project theme, discipline, or state. Each cataloged public humanities project is categorized into at least one of the following groups: outreach, engaged research, engaged teaching, engaged public programming, and the infrastructure of engagement. About fifty projects have full profiles and the remaining have thumbnail descriptions, as well as links to every project's website. Humanities for All is based on a survey conducted in 2017-2018 and led by Daniel Fischer, a project director and postdoctoral fellow at the National Humanities Alliance Foundation."

 

.

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Sign of the Times (1/20/19) in Seattle

Sign of the Times (1/20/19) in Seattle | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Impacted by the government shutdown? Have a night at the theatre on us!

 

Starting today, we are offering two complimentary tickets to Last of the Boys or The Woman in Black to all furloughed federal employees. Just present your government I.D. at the Box Office or call (206) 443-2222 to reserve your tickets.

 

Learn more about the shows here! --> https://www.seattlerep.org

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

 

This is beautiful! Great thing to discuss with students.

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ClassDojo Conundrums

ClassDojo Conundrums | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Quick, fun, inquiry-based questions to get students thinking critically, discussing positively, and supporting their opinions! Created by Josh Dahn, head of school at Ad Astra.
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Innovating Pedagogy 2019: Learning can be wonderful!

Innovating Pedagogy 2019: Learning can be wonderful! | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Learning can be playful, wonderful, a way of understanding and making sense of the world” (Innovating Pedagogy 2019).

It’s here! If you are like me, you have been waiting since mid November for the release of the seventh Innovating Pedagogy report. The 2019 edition is a departure of the usual end of year publication date, hence the chronology moved from 2017 to 2019. I personally welcome the change, as it allows us at AACE Review to start the year with a fresh set of pedagogical innovations to contemplate.

The Open University published this edition in collaboration with the Centre for the Science of Learning & Technology (SLATE), University of Bergen, Norway. As usual, the report proposes ten innovations that are already in currency but have not had a profound influence on education in their current form. Each trend is rated based on its impact (high or medium) and placed on a timeline for adoption (ongoing, 2-5 years, 4+ years).


Via Edumorfosis
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Out of Our Minds: Learning to be Creative :: Ken Robinson

Out of Our Minds: Learning to be Creative :: Ken Robinson | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Complete 2nd edition of Robinson's great book on creativity is available here to read online, for free.

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Japanese Hotel Fires Robot Staff After They Annoy Human Staff and Guests - Interesting Engineering

Japanese Hotel Fires Robot Staff After They Annoy Human Staff and Guests - Interesting Engineering | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
A Japanese hotel has fired hundred of its robotic staff because they weren't doing a good job. The Henn-na “Strange” Hotel in Nagasaki Prefecture has laid off 243 robots after they started to cause more work for their human colleagues. 

One of the robots that got the ax was a doll-shaped assistant placed in each room called Churi. Churi was supposed to help guests plan their stay by answering questions about local attractions

Via John Evans
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Leaders of Their Own Learning: Chapter 4: Models, Critique, and Descriptive Feedback | EL Education

Leaders of Their Own Learning: Chapter 4: Models, Critique, and Descriptive Feedback | EL Education | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Imagine a ballet troupe without a teacher who continually adjusts students’ posture and position, or a basketball team that never critiques strategies during halftime or analyzes their plays on video. These ongoing feedback practices, which help us improve, are essential in nearly every field. Despite its prevalence in the world, this kind of on-the-job, on-the-spot feedback, based on strong models, is still strangely absent from many schools and classrooms. To be sure, grades and test scores are routinely given, and occasionally students get assignments returned with comments, but these “results” are often too distant from the moment of learning or effort to be useful or too cryptic to be meaningful to students.

"Now more than ever, students need models of work that meet rigorous standards, and they need structured opportunities for critique and descriptive feedback so that they too can produce work that meets the standards. Students and teachers alike will benefit from seeing—sometimes even holding in their hands—examples of what they are aiming for."

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Student-Led Culture Change :: Edutopia

Student-Led Culture Change :: Edutopia | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
The tardy bell rang 15 minutes ago. You spot five students yelling and running into the restroom as you turn the corner, and you ask yourself, “What can I do to encourage these kids to report to their classrooms on time and ready to learn?”

School leaders spend much of their day focused on the management and logistics of running a school, but creating a positive and inclusive culture requires paying attention to different facets of the campus environment. Involving students in shaping the learning environment can yield positive results.

The protégé effect, or using peer-to-peer techniques, can be useful not only in the classroom but in developing a healthier, more positive school culture. School leaders should involve student leaders in the implementation of Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) to consistently foster an environment that’s conducive to learning.
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Learning Engineering: Merging Science and Data to Design Learning

Learning Engineering: Merging Science and Data to Design Learning | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
By Shelly Blake-Plock - A Learning Engineer is someone who draws from evidence-based information about human development — including learning — and seeks to apply these results at scale, within contexts, to create affordable, reliable, data-rich learning environments.

Via Vladimir Kukharenko, stevebatch
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The Power of Project Learning | Scholastic.com

The Power of Project Learning | Scholastic.com | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Here’s a riddle: Imagine there is a learning technique proven effective through 100 years of use that is now enhanced by the power of today’s technology. Imagine it can excite learners to continue their work well past the parameters of the school day. What is it, and would every school in the country do it?

It is project-based learning, and the answer is yes, and no. Project-based learning can be traced back to John Dewey and it has come and gone since the early 20th century. As a pedagogical method, it often meets resistance since it doesn’t fit the skill-and-drill model that typically dominates education. But today, it is enjoying a comeback as cutting-edge schools demonstrate just how effectively it imparts the skills students need in today’s workforce.
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A Leadership-Oriented Solution for Arts Integration :: ASCD

A Leadership-Oriented Solution for Arts Integration :: ASCD | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"A boost from the arts in core curriculum subjects can improve cognitive skills and engagement and motivate hard-to-reach students. As the director of fine arts for Georgia's Clayton County Public Schools, I work with other district leaders to integrate the arts—drawing, dance, theater, and music—into our classrooms. By targeting our school's leadership teams before building staff capacity, we ensured that teachers had the full support they needed to reshape the learning climate for creativity.

"As educators, we tend to be skeptical of new ideas. We don't believe something works until we see that it's working in a school or a district similar to our own. That's why presenting research to support our proposal was vital to convince principals of its importance. The 2011 report "Reinvesting in Arts Education" from the now-defunct President's Committee on the Arts and Humanities, which discusses the key role of the arts in a well-rounded education, was particularly helpful. We showed leaders the link between integration and richer engagement, the potential for higher achievement in other subjects, and the arts' improvement of students' innovative skills. We began our integration with a small group of schools where principals were firmly behind the idea."

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Learning from Your Peers with Pineapple Charts :: Lori Gracey

Learning from Your Peers with Pineapple Charts :: Lori Gracey | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Everyday, amazing things are happening in classrooms on your campus and in your district. But you may not be aware of what your colleagues are doing because you are so busy with your own students. Mark Barnes and Jennifer Gonzalez, authors of Hacking Education: 10 Quick Fixes for Every School, have a brilliant and easy solution: the pineapple chart.

What’s a Pineapple Chart?

"If you have a lesson planned that you believe other teachers might be interested in, whether it’s for a particular teaching technique you’ll be using, a new Web 2.0 tool, or a powerful way to differentiate learning, you post that information in the faculty workroom (or anywhere teachers gather) on a pineapple chart. The chart is based on the idea of a pineapple as a symbol of welcome and includes all the days of the week and each period of the day. You post your interesting lesson on the chart on the specific day and time when you’ll be teaching it and thus invite your colleagues in to watch you in action. Here’s a sample."

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6 Ed Tech Tools to Try in 2019 :: Jennifer Gonzalez

6 Ed Tech Tools to Try in 2019 :: Jennifer Gonzalez | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Every January, I launch a brand-new edition of my Teacher’s Guide to Tech. As challenging and time-consuming as it is to put this guide together every year, it’s also pretty magical. I find myself sitting at my keyboard with a million browser tabs open and it happens—that moment when I come across some idea that someone has brought into the world and I think Holy cow, this is good. The thought that someone saw a problem or a need in the world, and they used code to create something brand new to meet that need—that process, that realization of human creativity, is just incredible to me. I watch as these tools come and go and change over time and I marvel at the people behind them, the risks they take, their willingness to try new stuff and push their ideas out into the world.

I don’t think technology is the end-all be-all, and of course it brings new problems into our lives, but just watching the creativity behind these tools makes me so excited to live in a time when so many ordinary people can actually bring their ideas to life and watch those ideas impact the world.

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

 

OUTSTANDING collection. Gonzalez is a gem of a resource for educators and you are sure to find something fascinating here.

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Arts Integration: A Creative Pathway for Teaching - Educational Leadership

Arts Integration: A Creative Pathway for Teaching - Educational Leadership | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Imagine walking into an elementary school and seeing a diverse group of students hard at work in language arts, science, math, and social studies. But as you observe them, you hear the students singing, or see them dancing, acting, and creating works of visual art—all in ways that reflect their growing understanding of the core content area. This highly engaging approach to teaching, in which students learn core subjects through the arts (theater, music, visual arts, dance, and media arts), is known as arts integration.

Through a program developed by the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, six elementary schools in the Washington, D.C., area have adopted arts integration as a way to boost learning for their diverse populations. Changing Education Through the Arts (CETA) provides teachers with professional learning experiences in arts integration and support to implement that instruction in their classrooms. The program started with voluntary teams of teachers from one or two grade levels in each school. Today, all teachers participate.
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