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Making a Crypto Utopia in Puerto Rico :: NY Times

Making a Crypto Utopia in Puerto Rico :: NY Times | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

They call what they are building Puertopia. But then someone told them, apparently in all seriousness, that it translates to “eternal boy playground” in Latin. So they are changing the name: They will call it Sol.

"Dozens of entrepreneurs, made newly wealthy by blockchain and cryptocurrencies, are heading en masse to Puerto Rico this winter. They are selling their homes and cars in California and establishing residency on the Caribbean island in hopes of avoiding what they see as onerous state and federal taxes on their growing fortunes, some of which now reach into the billions of dollars.

"And these men — because they are almost exclusively men — have a plan for what to do with the wealth: They want to build a crypto utopia, a new city where the money is virtual and the contracts are all public, to show the rest of the world what a crypto future could look like. Blockchain, a digital ledger that forms the basis of virtual currencies, has the potential to reinvent society — and the Puertopians want to prove it.

"For more than a year, the entrepreneurs had been searching for the best location. After Hurricane Maria decimated Puerto Rico’s infrastructure in September and the price of cryptocurrencies began to soar, they saw an opportunity and felt a sense of urgency."

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

 

Truly, truly amazing!

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:: The 4th Era ::
Impact of the internet age on human culture and K-20 education policy/administration
Curated by Jim Lerman
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Introducing this work

Introducing this work | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

For the purposes of this site, the history of human interaction with information may be divided into 4 eras. The first (spoken) era ended with the invention of writing around 3000-4000 BC. The second era ended with the invention of the printing press in 1440. The third era ended, and the fourth began, with the invention of the Internet (depending how one defines its operational beginning) somewhere between 1969 and 1982. We now exist early, but decidedly, in the fourth era.

 

All readers may not agree with this interpretation of the history of information, especially with the division and numbering of the eras. That is not the main point. Rather, it is that humankind presently exists in an era distinctly different from the one that preceded it -- that in fact, this new era is accompanied with, and characterized by, a new - and quite different - information landscape. This new Internet information landscape will challenge, disrupt, and overpower the print-oriented one that came before it. It will not completely obliterate that which preceded it, but it will render it to a subsidiary, rather than primary, level of influence.

 

Just as the printing press altered humanity's relationship with information, thereby resulting in massive restructuring of political, religious, economic, social, educational, cultural, scientific, and other realms of life; so too will the advance of digital technology occasion analogous transformations in the corresponding universe of present and future human activity.

 

This site will concern itself primarily with how K-20 education in the US, and the people who comprise its constituencies, may be affected by this transformative movement from one era to the next. All ideas considered here appear, to me at least, to impact the learning enterprise in some way. Accordingly, this work looks at the present and the future through a lens that is predominantly, but far from entirely, a digital one. -JL

 

Opinions expressed, scooped, or copied in this Scoop.it topic are my own, or a result of my own judgment, and should in no way be understood to reflect those of my employer.

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Margaret Waage's comment, June 20, 2013 7:43 AM
Jim - I like your perspective. Great subject matter here!
Margaret Waage's comment, June 20, 2013 7:46 AM
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Azania Nduli-AmaZulu UbuntuPsychology.ORG's curator insight, July 8, 2013 6:24 PM

Beautiful!

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A Map of Every Building in America - The New York Times

A Map of Every Building in America - The New York Times | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"These images are drawn from a huge database that Microsoft released to the public this year. The company’s computer engineers trained a neural network to analyze satellite imagery and then to trace the shapes of buildings across the country. Such information has been available before in some places, but this is the first comprehensive database covering the entire United States.

"In some cases, we have augmented the data with information from state and local governments that have collected their own.

"Classic maps answer questions like: How do I get from Point A to Point B? These data images, instead, evoke questions — sometimes, simply: What’s that?

"We found fascinating patterns in the arrangements of buildings. Traditional road maps highlight streets and highways; here they show up as a linear absence.

"Where buildings are clustered together, in downtowns, the image is darker, dense. As suburbs stretch out with their larger lawns and malls, the map grows lighter. Your eye can follow the ways that development conforms to landscape features like water and slopes.

"You can read history in the transition from curving, paved-over cow paths in old downtowns to suburban sprawl; you can detect signals of wealth and poverty, sometimes almost next door to each other. It all reveals what Andy Woodruff, a cartographer, calls “the sometimes aesthetically pleasing patterns of the built environment.”

 

Image above shows housing patterns in Mesa, Arizona. -JL

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Coming soon to Ivy League campuses: free coffee, privacy not included

Coming soon to Ivy League campuses: free coffee, privacy not included | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
A small but growing café chain is strategically opening locations near Ivy League universities and other top campuses, offering an irresistible bargain or, depending on your point of view, an unconscionable one.

The cashless Shiru cafés give out handmade coffee and tea drinks for free. In exchange, students flash a university ID and, in the bargain, hand over a small cache of personal information: name, age, email address, interests, major and graduation year, among other details. They also agree to be contacted by Shiru’s corporate sponsors, who underwrite all those cappuccinos, matcha lattes and iced Americanos.

Customers may also provide a rundown of their IT skills, previous internships and an indication of the size of company they might be interested in working for.
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Personalized Learning, Teachers Unleashed, and a Learning Analytics Partnership: The Story of Fresno Unified | EdSurge News

How does a fifth grader feel getting ready to do a live edtech demo at their local school board meeting?

If you are Ryan Fernandez of Fresno Unified School District, you take such challenges in stride. At last February’s Board meeting, 10-year old Ryan inspired the adults in the room to see how tech can be leveraged for learning in a whole new light. (Here’s a video of Ryan’s command performance.)

Ryan had this chance to shine because of Fresno’s Personalized Learning Initiative (PLI), which has been fostering student voice, choice and collaboration over the last two years. A report released this September by Digital Promise, Microsoft, Fresno and Houghton Mifflin, tells the story of Fresno’s PLI and its impact on learning across the district. With 71,000 students, Fresno is the fourth largest district in California. Seventy-eight percent of its students are low income and 22 percent are learning English. In other words, Fresno Unified represents some of our country’s most disadvantaged students.

But last year, changes in Ryan’s classroom gave Ryan a different way to participate in learning. And that change has allowed Ryan’s learning and, more importantly, his mindset about learning, to thrive. His experience is not unique: over 17,000 students in Fresno were involved in the PLI last year, and the data clearly shows that most of those students made statistically significant gains. What exactly is happening in these classrooms? How does the community of PLI teachers foster these changes? What enabling conditions has the district put in place for this to happen at scale? Three key elements tell the story of the PLI’s success.

 

[This is a report sponsored by Microsoft-JL]

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Future of Learning: A rural Montana district goes all in on makerspaces

Future of Learning: A rural Montana district goes all in on makerspaces | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
In Havre Public Schools in northern Montana, it’s not uncommon for middle schoolers to arrive early. Parents need to get to work and the school building is a safe place to drop them off, even before classes start. Some students play basketball or volleyball as the clock ticks closer to first period, but for those who don’t like sports, there has been little else to do than sit on the bleachers and wait — until this year.
 
Now the middle school, along with two of the district’s other elementary schools and its high school, have makerspaces. Beyond giving students a new way to pass the time in the mornings, Superintendent Andy Carlson sees the makerspaces as a way to engage kids who may have been marginalized in past years because of their interests.
 
“The makerspace has given some opportunity for those kids to have their moment, for them to shine,” Carlson said.

 

[image does not depict makerspace from the Havre district-JL]

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Cutting To The Chase – How a School’s Approach To Technology Can Impact Learning Outcomes

Cutting To The Chase – How a School’s Approach To Technology Can Impact Learning Outcomes | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Technology can help transform learning. But as numerous studies have shown, more tech in the classroom doesn’t automatically equal better results. Most notably, OECD and Hattie have raised concerns that education spending does not equate to better outcomes. Effective learning and technology use each depend on systems and behaviors that are more complex than putting a device in someone’s hands."


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Oscar Carrera's curator insight, October 5, 2:07 PM

In order for educational technologies to be effective in the classroom, there needs to be great teaching practice by the teacher too.

Amanda Borges's curator insight, October 9, 1:56 PM
Technology can help transform learning. But, as several studies have shown, more technology in the classroom does not automatically match the best results.
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Suppressing the reasoning part of the brain stimulates creativity, scientists find | Science | The Guardian

Suppressing the reasoning part of the brain stimulates creativity, scientists find | Science | The Guardian | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Researchers have found that suppressing activity in part of the brain involved in planning and reasoning can boost an individual’s ability to think in creative ways and solve mind-bending problems.

"But the benefits come at a price.

“We can improve very specific think-out-of-the-box [processes], but at the same time we decrease working memory processes,” said Caroline Di Bernardi Luft, co-author of the study from Queen Mary, University of London.

"Previous research by scientists in Australia found that participants who had been given small amounts of electrical stimulation were three times more likely to solve puzzles than those who had not had their brains “zapped”.

"However the team behind the new study say it was not clear whether it was the suppression or the excitation of different parts of the brain that was responsible for the boost in insight."

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Little-known BARR program has lifted 9th grade performance almost everywhere

Little-known BARR program has lifted 9th grade performance almost everywhere | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

There’s a school improvement model that has gotten consistent results in large schools, small schools, high-performing ones, low-performing ones, those with large achievement gaps, diverse schools, homogeneous ones, and schools that are rural, urban and suburban. An impressive track record of hard evidence has made it the only program to earn three levels of competitive grant funding from the federal government since 2010.

But you’ve probably never heard of it.

The Building Assets, Reducing Risks program, known as BARR, was started by a Minneapolis school counselor in 1999, and remained in relative obscurity for a decade. Since 2010, its creator, Angela Jerabek, has sought research support to test the BARR program in other schools. The BARR mantra – “Same Students. Same Teachers. Better Results.” – has led Jerabek to aggressively seek out schools in different regions, with different demographics, to test her theory. So far, it holds up.

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

 

Well researched and encouraging article. Well worth reading.

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Amanda Borges's curator insight, October 9, 1:40 PM
There’s a school improvement model that has gotten consistent results in large schools, small schools, high-performing ones, low-performing ones, those with large achievement gaps, diverse schools, homogenous ones, and schools that are rural, urban and suburban. An impressive track record of hard evidence has made it the only program to earn three levels of competitive grant funding from the federal government since 2010.
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Financial gaps among Allegheny County school districts are numerous. How funding affects everything from musicals to safety.

Financial gaps among Allegheny County school districts are numerous. How funding affects everything from musicals to safety. | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Districts with strong local tax bases can make up for the lack of state funds and are able to offer students state-of-the-art technology, rich art and music programs, an array of Advanced Placement courses and a large selection of extracurricular and sports opportunities.

But districts that lack the ability to raise significant local revenue through taxes are operating with bare-bones curriculum, limited technology, extracurricular and sports options and deteriorating facilities. They’re also often going without librarians, school resource officers and full-time nurses in their buildings.
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[PDF] It's learning: Just not as we know it

[PDF] It's learning: Just not as we know it | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
The future of Work is a race between education and technologies. Blockchain, AI and advanced biosciences promise new efficiencies and growth opportunities at a time when leading economies are struggling with weak productivity gains and, in some cases, slow GDP growth. But it’s easier said than done.
 
Industrial age education and training systems put these economic opportunities at risk. If skill-building doesn’t catch up with the rate of technological progress, the G20 economies could lose up to US$11.5 trillion in cumulative GDP growth in the next ten years. That’s equivalent to losing more than an entire percentage point from the average annual growth rate every year over that period.
 
For this report, we look through the lens of the future worker – from the shop floor to the boardroom, from the shop front to the back office – and we identify their evolving skills demand. We analyze the changing importance of skills to different roles and the impact of intelligent technologies.
 
Contrary to conventional wisdom, this is not about technological skills. It is about cultivating the full range of skills, from the creative to the complex cognitive capabilities that the future workforce will need. Our diagnosis: Current education and corporate learning systems are not equipped to address the coming revolution in skills demand. The challenge is especially urgent for roles that are more vulnerable to dislocation through intelligent automation. The impact is uneven across economies and industries, demanding targeted interventions.
 
Our proposed solutions: Learning with experiential techniques, shifting the focus from institutions to individuals and empowering the most vulnerable people to learn. Advances in the science of learning, paired with new technologies, allow pioneering businesses to offer new approaches to learning. The challenge? Accelerating their adoption across all organizations, large and small, and throughout education systems in the G20 economies.

Via Edumorfosis
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Kim Flintoff's curator insight, September 30, 7:19 PM
The future of Work is a race between education and technologies. Blockchain, AI and advanced biosciences promise new efficiencies and growth opportunities at a time when leading economies are struggling with weak productivity gains and, in some cases, slow GDP growth. But it’s easier said than done.
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Levers and Logic Models: A Framework to Guide Research and Design of High-Quality Competency-Based Education Systems

Levers and Logic Models: A Framework to Guide Research and Design of High-Quality Competency-Based Education Systems | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Levers and Logic Models: A Framework to Guide Research and Design of High-Quality Competency-Based Education Systems, uses logic model frameworks to convey relationships between essential levers (outcomes, drivers and mediating factors) that inform the design of competency-based education systems and critical components of competency-based practice at four interdependent levels (student experience, professional practice of educators, district …
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What Kids Need to Learn to Succeed in 2050 – Youth, Now –

"In such a world, the last thing a teacher needs to give her pupils is more information. They already have far too much of it. Instead, people need the ability to make sense of information, to tell the difference between what is important and what is unimportant, and, above all, to combine many bits of information into a broad picture of the world."

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

 

A thoughtful reflection on the next 30 years or so; makes for interesting reading. A good investment of your time.

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Top Tools for Learning 2018 – Top Tools for Learning 2018

Top Tools for Learning 2018 – Top Tools for Learning 2018 | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
The Top Tools for Learning 2018 list was compiled by Jane Hart at the Centre for Learning & Performance Technologies from the results of the 12th Annual Digital Learning Tools Survey, and released on 24 September 2018. [Find out more about the survey and read Jane’s analysis of this year’s list.]

Below you will find an interactive table of the Top 200 Tools for Learning 2018. This table also shows their presence on 3 sub-lists, how they fit into 30 defined categories of tools as well as their change in position since 2017. (You can sort each column using the up/down arrows to the right of each column, and filter using Search. Click a tool name to find out more it.)

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

 

Jane Hart has steadfastly compiled and reported a survey of the top learning tools each year, for the past 12 years. What dedicated work! The results are always fascinating and informative -- and no matter how much you know, there's always something new to learn about. Congratulations to Jane for another job well done!

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Opinion | There May Soon Be Three Internets. America’s Won’t Necessarily Be the Best. - The New York Times

Opinion | There May Soon Be Three Internets. America’s Won’t Necessarily Be the Best. - The New York Times | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
The received wisdom was once that a unified, unbounded web promoted democracy through the free flow of information. Things don’t seem quite so simple anymore. China’s tight control of the internet within its borders continues to tamp down talk of democracy, and an increasingly sophisticated system of digital surveillance plays a major role in human rights abuses, such as the persecution of the Uighurs. We’ve also seen the dark side to connecting people to one another — as illustrated by how misinformation on social media played a significant role in the violence in Myanmar.

There’s a world of difference between the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation, known commonly as G.D.P.R., and China’s technologically enforced censorship regime, often dubbed “the Great Firewall.” But all three spheres — Europe, America and China — are generating sets of rules, regulations and norms that are beginning to rub up against one another. What’s more, the actual physical location of data has increasingly become separated by region, with data confined to data centers inside the borders of countries with data localization laws.
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Some Answers to Today's Problems Were Known in the 1950s (and probably well before that)

Some Answers to Today's Problems Were Known in the 1950s (and probably well before that) | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Coach Red Auerbach along with guard Bob Cousy,  led the Boston Celtics to 9 NBA championships during the 10 years between 1957 and 1966. These were also the years in which Bill Russell (not pictured) excelled.

 

No link to this one. Found on my LinkedIn feed. -JL

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How to Delete Facebook and Instagram From Your Life Forever - The New York Times

How to Delete Facebook and Instagram From Your Life Forever - The New York Times | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"After the disclosure of Facebook’s breach, I felt my trust in the social network was broken. So I pulled out my data from Facebook and purged the account. What I found out about the process: The more you have integrated Facebook into your life, the more time-consuming it will be to delete it.

"To make account deletion as painless as possible, here is a step-by-step guide. I also included steps on breaking up with Instagram, Facebook’s photo-sharing app, for those looking for a cleaner getaway."

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piyades's comment, October 15, 6:59 AM

we can now watch instagram stories without anyone realizing it. In my opinion awesome innovation we can also make a location search https://www.picstalker.com/
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Measuring Up: How Community Colleges Define, Measure and Support Student Success | EdSurge Guides

"Should completion be the barometer of success for community college students? The EdSurge Research team explores how community colleges define student success, what indicators they track and analyze, and what role technology plays in monitoring progress for every student."

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Why a Web of Connections—Not a single relationship—Should surround students

Why a Web of Connections—Not a single relationship—Should surround students | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Advocates for personalized learning have bold and plentiful ambitions for students: higher rates of engagement, greater persistence, healthy development and expanded opportunity—not to mention improved academics. All of these ambitions to support healthy, whole child development often fall to a single, key relationship at the heart of any school: the relationship between students and their teachers.

Putting student-teacher connections at the center of personalized learning efforts is clearly a good idea, especially to curb a tendency to focus on technology over teaching. Both champions and skeptics are taking pains to make that point. Saro Mohammed of The Learning Accelerator has written that “Perhaps the best kept secret of research on edtech is the fact that teachers and teaching remain the most important influences on learning.” And veteran educator Peter Greene summed it up well in his recent Forbes article detailing inevitable tensions between personalization and scale: “It's nearly impossible to personalize instruction with just one person involved,” he wrote.


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Creative thought has a pattern of its own, brain activity scans reveal | Science | The Guardian

Creative thought has a pattern of its own, brain activity scans reveal | Science | The Guardian | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

People who are flexible, original thinkers show signature forms of connectivity in their brains, study shows

The brain activity that underpins original thought has been hard to pin down until now. 


Every artist has their own way of generating original ideas, but what is happening inside the brain might not be so individual. In new research, scientists report signature patterns of neural activity that mark out those who are most creative.

“We have identified a pattern of brain connectivity that varies across people, but is associated with the ability to come up with creative ideas,” said Roger Beaty, a psychologist at Harvard University. “It’s not like we can predict with perfect accuracy who’s going to be the next Einstein, but we can get a pretty good sense of how flexible a given person’s thinking is.”

"Creative thinking is one of the primary drivers of cultural and technological change, but the brain activity that underpins original thought has been hard to pin down. In an effort to shed light on the creative process, Beaty teamed up with colleagues in Austria and China to scan people’s brains as they came up with original ideas."

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David W. Deeds's curator insight, October 4, 3:46 AM

Check this out! Thanks to Jim Lerman. 

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US military successfully tests electrical brain stimulation to enhance staff skills | Science | The Guardian

US military successfully tests electrical brain stimulation to enhance staff skills | Science | The Guardian | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"US military scientists have used electrical brain stimulators to enhance mental skills of staff, in research that aims to boost the performance of air crews, drone operators and others in the armed forces’ most demanding roles.

"The successful tests of the devices pave the way for servicemen and women to be wired up at critical times of duty, so that electrical pulses can be beamed into their brains to improve their effectiveness in high pressure situations.

"The brain stimulation kits use five electrodes to send weak electric currents through the skull and into specific parts of the cortex. Previous studies have found evidence that by helping neurons to fire, these minor brain zaps can boost cognitive ability.


"The technology is seen as a safer alternative to prescription drugs, such as modafinil and ritalin, both of which have been used off-label as performance enhancing drugs in the armed forces."

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The Future of Learning: Redefining {Employment} Readiness from the Inside Out :: KnowledgeWorks

The Future of Learning: Redefining {Employment} Readiness from the Inside Out :: KnowledgeWorks | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Babies born this year will have graduated from college by 2040 and be entering the workforce. Will they be ready?

Download our paper on The Future of Learning: Redefining Readiness from the Inside Out and learn how career readiness may be redefined to better prepare students for an uncertain future, based on a series of in-depth interviews with employees at cutting-edge organizations, as well as site visits to workspaces and strategic foresight research into current trends.

“By redefining readiness, we will better ensure all students are prepared for a future that is filled with uncertainty,” said KnowledgeWorks Senior Director of Strategic Foresight Katherine Prince."

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35 Resources for the STEAM Classroom: Putting the Arts in STEM :: Michael Gorman - Tech & Learning magazine

35 Resources for the STEAM Classroom: Putting the Arts in STEM :: Michael Gorman - Tech & Learning magazine | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Proper infusion of the Arts will create a STEAM culture that engages and promotes intrinsic learning. In the space below I have included some sites that may just allow educators to integrate the Arts, allowing STEM to become STEAM! While there is a lot of talk on STEAM Education, it can be difficult to find a lot of material. I hope you enjoy what I have gathered and please let me know what I should include in an update post. Time to go full STEAM ahead!"

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

Solid collection of resources...for beginners and more advanced practitioners alike.

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Working in a group might be the best way to help kids meet individual goals, study says :: Hechinger Report

Working in a group might be the best way to help kids meet individual goals, study says :: Hechinger Report | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
a new study out by the American Institutes for Research (AIR), a nonprofit research firm, makes the argument that collaborative, group learning might actually serve each student’s individual academic needs quite well. In a study of almost 900 high school students at four different schools, the researchers found that the more high-quality collaborative learning experiences students had at school, the more that the students said they felt their personal learning needs were met and that they were adequately challenged and supported when they needed help.

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Christian William da Silva's comment, October 3, 9:04 PM
Very good!
Nicolas Mike's comment, October 3, 9:20 PM
Good! It is really important to do these works in schools
Amanda Borges's curator insight, October 9, 1:53 PM
Critics argue that it is not good for students to learn in isolation and that learning is a social activity not only between student and teacher, but among students.
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10 ways administrators should be collaborating with their librarians

10 ways administrators should be collaborating with their librarians | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Whether a principal, superintendent, head of technology, or head of curriculum, there is likely a gem of a resource among your staff who could push your Future Ready agenda forward. Long gone are the days when librarians were simply the “keeper of books,” and the administrators who have grown to realize this have found it much easier to accomplish their strategic vision by mobilizing this dedicated and knowledgeable part of their staff. Here’s how many are doing it."


Via EDTECH@UTRGV, Stewart-Marshall
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EDTECH@UTRGV's curator insight, September 25, 12:08 PM

This article goes out to all the future-ready librarians. Your rock!

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T74: Meet the 'diverse-by-design' architect leading San Antonio's school innovations | 74 Films: In a poor corner of Texas an integration breakthrough

T74: Meet the 'diverse-by-design' architect leading San Antonio's school innovations | 74 Films: In a poor corner of Texas an integration breakthrough | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"First up today, ...the next installment in our portfolio of articles, videos, explainers, and profiles documenting the transformation-in-progress happening in one of America’s poorest zip codes. San Antonio Independent School District — by setting out to understand student poverty in unheard-of ways, opening specialized schools that have attracted affluent families from outside its borders for the first time, and creating a data-driven enrollment system that saves seats in those schools for its neediest students — is raising outcomes and expectations for all the students who live in the 78207.

 

"Yesterday, we brought you Beth Hawkins' deeply reported profile on the vision and accomplishments of San Antonio ISD’s superintendent, Pedro Martinez.

"Today, we bring you the architect of it all — Mohammed Choudhury, the district's chief innovation officer, hired by Martinez to get a better grasp on the district's poverty data and to develop enrollment algorithms that would ensure more integrated classrooms and a more equitable allotment of seats.

Choudhury’s grandfather opened a school in the family’s village in 1953, a time when only children of the wealthy were educated. It might be on a different continent and a lifetime later, but Choudhury sees himself as fulfilling his family’s legacy in San Antonio, creating schools where education can serve as a means to self-determination. “I am a proud product of an urban school district,” he says. “My family is that story of the American dream.”


"The American dream is not what comes to mind when touring the 78207, San Antonio’s poorest zip code. This is a place where that dream derailed, where struggling Latinos were redlined into an isolated urban core. But the story of the 78207 is about more than deprivation; it’s about tight-knit families, remarkable success stories, a vibrant local arts scene, and a cadre of school and community leaders changing the conversation about what is possible for San Antonio ISD students.

"Also new to our homepage today is the latest 74 documentary “A school breakthrough in Texas — built around income, choice, and community," produced by Heather Martino and directed and edited by James Fields. The short film captures the hardships and the challenges facing the 78207 and the larger San Antonio ISD, while focusing on dedicated educators and the innovations they are putting into place around income integration and diverse-by-design schools that could rewrite that story:

“When you live in poverty,” Martinez says, “the biggest challenge we have is, how do you instill hope?”

"Here are today's new additions to our San Antonio, 78207 series:

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Focus Your Lectures with the ‘One-Sentence Lesson Plan’

Focus Your Lectures with the ‘One-Sentence Lesson Plan’ | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"When we start with the content first, rather than with the why, we rob students of the opportunity to contextualize the topic. Asking students about their experiences buying a new flash drive will help them relate to the potentially dull topic of “evaluating the credibility of sources.” Research such as those by Ambrose et al. (2010) suggest that anchoring new topics to something familiar helps students learn more effectively (2).

Based on my one-sentence lesson plan, here’s a simple breakdown of my lecture:

Opening: Ask students their experiences searching information on the Internet
Mini-lesson: Teach them how to triangulate information (or better yet, start by asking them better ways to find information)
Guided practice: Model your “think-aloud” as you demonstrate with a new topic (e.g., evaluating the credibility of sources related to climate change)
Activity: Students apply the triangulating strategy (using their smartphone)
Closing: Discuss why good judgement is important in the information age


All that from a one-sentence lesson plan."

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