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Education for Life and Work: Developing Transferable Knowledge and Skills in the 21st Century | National Academies Press

Education for Life and Work: Developing Transferable Knowledge and Skills in the 21st Century | National Academies Press | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

THIS EXCELLENT BOOK MAY BE DOWNLOADED FOR FREE

 

From the website

 

"Americans have long recognized that investments in public education contribute to the common good, enhancing national prosperity and supporting stable families, neighborhoods, and communities. Education is even more critical today, in the face of economic, environmental, and social challenges. Today's children can meet future challenges if their schooling and informal learning activities prepare them for adult roles as citizens, employees, managers, parents, volunteers, and entrepreneurs. To achieve their full potential as adults, young people need to develop a range of skills and knowledge that facilitate mastery and application of English, mathematics, and other school subjects. At the same time, business and political leaders are increasingly asking schools to develop skills such as problem solving, critical thinking, communication, collaboration, and self-management - often referred to as "21st century skills."

 

"Education for Life and Work: Developing Transferable Knowledge and Skills in the 21st Century describes this important set of key skills that increase deeper learning, college and career readiness, student-centered learning, and higher order thinking. These labels include both cognitive and non-cognitive skills- such as critical thinking, problem solving, collaboration, effective communication, motivation, persistence, and learning to learn. 21st century skills also include creativity, innovation, and ethics that are important to later success and may be developed in formal or informal learning environments.

 

"This report also describes how these skills relate to each other and to more traditional academic skills and content in the key disciplines of reading, mathematics, and science. Education for Life and Work: Developing Transferable Knowledge and Skills in the 21st Century summarizes the findings of the research that investigates the importance of such skills to success in education, work, and other areas of adult responsibility and that demonstrates the importance of developing these skills in K-16 education. In this report, features related to learning these skills are identified, which include teacher professional development, curriculum, assessment, after-school and out-of-school programs, and informal learning centers such as exhibits and museums."

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:: The 4th Era ::
Impact of the internet age on human culture and K-20 education policy/administration
Curated by Jim Lerman
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Introducing this work

Introducing this work | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

For the purposes of this site, the history of human interaction with information may be divided into 4 eras. The first (spoken) era ended with the invention of writing around 3000-4000 BC. The second era ended with the invention of the printing press in 1440. The third era ended, and the fourth began, with the invention of the Internet (depending how one defines its operational beginning) somewhere between 1969 and 1982. We now exist early, but decidedly, in the fourth era.

 

All readers may not agree with this interpretation of the history of information, especially with the division and numbering of the eras. That is not the main point. Rather, it is that humankind presently exists in an era distinctly different from the one that preceded it -- that in fact, this new era is accompanied with, and characterized by, a new - and quite different - information landscape. This new Internet information landscape will challenge, disrupt, and overpower the print-oriented one that came before it. It will not completely obliterate that which preceded it, but it will render it to a subsidiary, rather than primary, level of influence.

 

Just as the printing press altered humanity's relationship with information, thereby resulting in massive restructuring of political, religious, economic, social, educational, cultural, scientific, and other realms of life; so too will the advance of digital technology occasion analogous transformations in the corresponding universe of present and future human activity.

 

This site will concern itself primarily with how K-20 education in the US, and the people who comprise its constituencies, may be affected by this transformative movement from one era to the next. All ideas considered here appear, to me at least, to impact the learning enterprise in some way. Accordingly, this work looks at the present and the future through a lens that is predominantly, but far from entirely, a digital one. -JL

 

Opinions expressed, scooped, or copied in this Scoop.it topic are my own, or a result of my own judgment, and should in no way be understood to reflect those of my employer.

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Margaret Waage's comment, June 20, 2013 7:43 AM
Jim - I like your perspective. Great subject matter here!
Margaret Waage's comment, June 20, 2013 7:46 AM
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Azania Nduli-AmaZulu UbuntuPsychology.ORG's curator insight, July 8, 2013 6:24 PM

Beautiful!

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3 Ways Parents Can Support Their Children’s Math Development — and Soothe Their Own Math Anxiety | The 74

3 Ways Parents Can Support Their Children’s Math Development — and Soothe Their Own Math Anxiety | The 74 | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Don’t like doing math? You’re not alone. But did you know parents play a critical role in their child’s development of math skills? Researchers have found that math-anxious parents can cause their children to perform poorly in the subject. The answer isn’t to avoid doing math with children; instead, here are some research-backed activities to make math fun, comfortable, and commonplace at home … for parents and kids."

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Reflections on the Role of Tutoria in the Future of Learning :: Richard Elmore

Reflections on the Role of Tutoria in the Future of Learning :: Richard Elmore | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"As part of my present consulting and on-line teaching practice, I have been undertaking a deep personal learning adventure into two complex bodies of research: (1) the neuroscience of learning, or, literally, how the brain works when it is assimilating and developing new knowledge and complex understandings; and (2) the relationship between the design of physical spaces, the processes by which people experience those spaces, and the learning that occurs in those spaces. These two bodies of knowledge are, in my view, critical to the future of learning in society. In tandem with this personal learning project,

 

"I am also working as a consultant in several settings on the design of new learning environments, as well as creating documentation of these environments for use by future leaders of learning in society at large. In my view, tutoria occupies a very special niche among the exemplars that will guide the future of learning. Tutoria is special in a number of powerful and informative ways. It is a practice that is designed to lead to the development of a progressively more complex and deep theory of learning, driven by the practice itself. The practice is relatively simple; the theory leads to increasingly powerful and complex understandings of how young people and adults learn. In this sense, it reverses the traditional social science relationship between theory and practice, and it creates a culture that is organized around what I would characterize as “deliberate surprises.” The practice emphasizes questions rather than answers.

 

The essence of the tutorial relationship is to give as much control as possible to the learner over the choice of what to learn and to structure the tutorial relationship around the learner’s discovery, through a dialectical process with the tutor, of how a body of knowledge works—not just what knowledge is, but how and why it takes the form it does. It stresses reasoning and discovery over fluency and speed in finding right answers. In my experience of being tutored, and in closely observing the tutorial process, it strikes me that,  when tutoria works well, there is a constant sense of tension and an expectation of the possibility of surprise. The learner is guided in a discovery process, unsure of where it will end. The tutor, no matter how many times they have conducted the tutorial in the same subject matter, expects to discover something unexpected about how this particular learner will respond to the challenge of understanding.

 

"The tutorial questions are devised not to produce “right” answers but to deepen the learners’ and tutors’ understanding of the content. In this context, the unexpected is highly valued, not an anomaly that requires fixing. I will say later why this deliberate cultivation of surprise embodies a powerful neurobiological insight. For the moment, it is important to observe that this is a practice that sheds light on an important theory of learning emerging from the science of neurology."

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

 

Elmore describes the practice of "tutoria" in Mexico, a process of peer tutoring by older (or more experienced) students of younger (or less experienced) ones.

 

To quote him further:

 

"I think tutoria is much more than a broad-scale social movement in the service of a transformational theory of learning; it is also a design experiment on the future of learning in a global environment in which established institutions are progressively losing their authority and control over learning and being replaced by forms of organization that we are just beginning to learn how to design. Its major strengths are that it serves populations of children and adults who are least likely to be well-served by established institutions and who are at risk of being ill-served by new, more global, more flexible forms of learning, and that it provides a “transitional form” of social organization for learning, modeling how a radical departure from traditional forms can coexist with and, on-and-off, live in a symbiotic relationship with old forms. It is also possible that one reason tutoria has been able to extend its reach into thousands of schools is that the established education sector in Mexico shows many of the symptoms of a failed state enterprise, pre-occupied with servings its constituent interests and only episodically aware of its primary mission. There is a deep need in society at large to confront these issues, and there is an even deeper capacity for denial of this urgency embedded in the existing institutional structure."

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Why Students Learn Better When They Teach (+ 4 Activities) - Edwords Blog - BAM! Radio Network

Why Students Learn Better When They Teach (+ 4 Activities) - Edwords Blog - BAM! Radio Network | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

When You Teach Something You Get To Learn It Twice - Jim Kwik

"Cameron, a former student of mine, who is now in college, commented on my recent post about efficient and effective learning titled Too Much What, Not Enough How. Here's what he wrote on Facebook:

"'As a student who graduated with a GPA well above 4.0, I completely agree specifically with the point about students teaching subject-matter. Most of what made me successful was not studying - I rarely did that - but teaching other students, and in doing so, closing gaps in and solidifying what I knew. I tutored other students in almost every single class I took throughout my high school career, especially the science courses. That was my secret to success and I didn't even realize it until senior year. The feeling you get when you help someone grasp an idea they struggled with is an awesome feeling, too.'

"But Why Is Teaching Such An Effective Learning Strategy?
If you closely analyze and dissect Cameron's comment you can identify at least 4 aspects that made his strategy of teaching others to learn it yourself super effective. They are Active Learning, Deeper Learning, Efficient Learning, and Emotional Learning. "

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What they don’t teach at University, but should

What they don’t teach at University, but should | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Even after four years of study, many students leave their institutions of higher learning only to find themselves inadequately prepared for what is next. University graduates often go on to get a certificate in an applied area in hopes of getting a job. Frequently graduate students who do not go into academia will find themselves adrift.

So what the heck have these institutions been doing with the valuable time of their students? Four years is a good chunk of time to accomplish something. We are told they are mastering a field. A field that often does not exist outside the institutional walls. But there are portable skills that can be learned WHILE at school. These are skills, like critical thinking, that universities purport to teach but usually do not.


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Sample Competency-Based High School Transcript :: KnowledgeWorks

Sample Competency-Based High School Transcript :: KnowledgeWorks | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Jim Lerman's insight:

 

This is a sample of a 2-page "Competency-Based High School Transcript" from KnowlegeWorks, a reputable education think tank. I don't know how I feel about it. I question the extent to which it represents an important improvement. To me, it seems to be largely giving grades using different language. I find the Scoring Legend on page 2 to be particularly poorly worded and confusing. The Measurement Topics are all content-based and fail to address Collaboration, Critical Thinking, Creativity, and Communication. The SEL topics on page 1 attempt to address this, but I think neither the topics themselves nor the numeric grade scale will be particularly helpful to students, parents, or post-secondary officials. Finally, what is to be done in this area with students whose performance is below 3?

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David W. Deeds's curator insight, April 18, 2:35 AM

This is interesting. Thanks to Jim Lerman.

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What Happens to Student Behavior When Schools Prioritize Art | MindShift | KQED News :: Sir Ken Robinson

What Happens to Student Behavior When Schools Prioritize Art | MindShift | KQED News :: Sir Ken Robinson | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
There’s more room to make changes within the current education system than many people think. Schools operate as they do not because they have to but because they choose to. They don’t need to be that way; they can change and many do. Innovative schools everywhere are breaking the mold of convention to meet the best interests of their students, families, and communities. As well as great teachers, what they have in common is visionary leadership. They have principals who are willing to make the changes that are needed to promote the success of all their students, whatever their circumstances and talents. A creative principal with the right powers of leadership can take a failing school and turn it into a hot spot of innovation and inclusion that benefits everyone it touches.

Take Orchard Gardens elementary school in Roxbury, Massachusetts. Ten years ago Orchard Gardens was in the doldrums. By most measures, it was one of the most troubled schools in the state. The school had five principals in its first seven years. Each fall, half the teachers did not return. Test scores were in the bottom 5 percent of all Massachusetts schools. The students were disaffected and unruly and there was a constant threat of violence. Students weren’t allowed to carry backpacks to school for fear that they might use them to conceal weapons, and there was an expensive staff of security guards, costing more than $250,000 a year, to make sure they didn’t. Remember, this was an elementary school.
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Article: Video Game Narratives Foster Civic Engagement, Not Violence

Article: Video Game Narratives Foster Civic Engagement, Not Violence | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Video games are suspected of inciting violence in youth, but a subgenre of literature borrowing narrative structures from video games suggests that they can instead boost youth empowerment and activism. These ludic (game- or play-oriented) stories also suggest ways storytelling can evolve to engage youth in a world where technology is not an add-on, but an essential way of being. Through a close analysis of Salman Rushdie’s (2010) children’s novel Luka and the Fire of Life, this study demonstrates the potential of integrating technology and storytelling to develop young people’s problem solving skills and civic engagement.
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5 Ways to Support New Teachers –

5 Ways to Support New Teachers – | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
New teachers are the lifeblood of schools and districts. It is vital that new teachers are supported and nurtured so that they stay in the profession. A recent survey from the National Center for Educational Statistics indicates that about 25% of teachers who left the profession did so indicating that administration was extremely unsupportive. Creating supportive and engaging working and learning environments for new teachers needs to be a priority for all administrators.
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T74 Preview: 'A Nation at Risk' documentary—36 pages that changed education | Bright spots from nation's report card | Anderson vs DeVos on discipline

T74 Preview: 'A Nation at Risk' documentary—36 pages that changed education | Bright spots from nation's report card | Anderson vs DeVos on discipline | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
The critical debate about how well our nation is educating its children is taking place in multiple quarters this week. This afternoon, the Ronald Reagan Institute begins a two-day summit in Washington, D.C., on how far we have come — and where we have stumbled — since “A Nation at Risk” first sounded an alarm bell on the state of America’s schools 35 years ago. Top education leaders from across the political spectrum will be leading the discussion as part of the institute’s thought-provoking Rise 2018 gathering. Today we've launched a full series of previews, videos and essays; you can find it all right here.

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

 

Quite a comprehensive review of the ed policy confab beginning on Thursday in Washington DC -- focused around the 35th anniversary of the "Nation at Risk" report.

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Apple’s Strongest Case to Reclaim the Education Market Is Not the New iPad | EdSurge News

Apple’s Strongest Case to Reclaim the Education Market Is Not the New iPad | EdSurge News | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Launching in June, Schoolwork allows a teacher to send out documents and open specific apps on their students’ iPads. It also gives them visibility into what each student is working on to make sure they are on task or to provide support. The tool integrates with School Manager, which helps manage and deploy devices. It is designed to work independently of Apple’s remote device management app, Classroom.

An additional feature in Schoolwork is that teachers can assign students to a specific activity within a third-party app that is integrated with Schoolwork. That means, for example, that a teacher can direct kids to do a specific assignment within Tynker, a coding app that is one of 15 education apps currently synced with Schoolwork. These apps can also feed data back to teachers to show students’ progress.

Giving teachers a single place to see how students are performing across different third-party apps is an enticing prospect. Other edtech companies have recently rolled out solutions to aggregate data from multiple programs, including Yet Analytics and Clever’s Goals, but the ability to assign a specific activity and receive data back is unique to Apple’s Schoolwork (for now).

For other education app creators to sync with Schoolwork, Apple is inviting developers to check out ClassKit, a set of APIs that they can use to connect with Schoolwork. Mindful of the aftermath of the Facebook and Cambridge Analytica incident, Apple vice president Susan Prescott underscored on stage that any data passed is private, and that the company has made available guidance for developers to meet these privacy requirements.

Additionally, Apple highlighted the Shared iPad feature, which was released two years ago as part of its iOS 9.3 update. That change brings it up to speed with Google Chromebooks and Microsoft devices. Recognizing that not all schools have 1:1 programs, this feature allows different students to pick up any iPad and login to their unique profile and access their individual apps and files.
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The Promise of Performance Assessments: Innovations in High School Learning and Higher Education Admissions :: Learning Policy Institute

The Promise of Performance Assessments: Innovations in High School Learning and Higher Education Admissions :: Learning Policy Institute | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
As states, districts, and schools are expanding instruction to include the competencies associated with college, career, and civic readiness, they are also developing ways to measure mastery of these deeper learning and higher-order thinking skills. These measures include performance assessments, such as portfolios, capstone projects, and senior defenses, alongside classroom performance. Meanwhile, more than 900 colleges have made standardized tests optional in their admissions processes and are looking for more effective ways to recognize an array of student accomplishments. As a result of these converging trends, a growing number of colleges are seeking more ways to include these broader portfolios of student work in their admission processes.

This report looks at how these assessments, which focus on the kind of learning students will need to be successful in our innovation economy, are being used to inform college admission, placement, and advising decisions, as well as how they're being used to leverage deeper forms of learning at all levels. The report describes a number of highly effective k-12 performance assessment systems in the United States and abroad and includes an appendix on current state policies supporting performance assessment. The report also discusses how college curricula and assessments are changing to foster deeper learning, and describes innovative college admission systems using these assessments.
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Expanding High-Quality Educational Options for All Students: How States Can Create a System of Schools Worth Choosing :: Learning Policy Institute

Expanding High-Quality Educational Options for All Students: How States Can Create a System of Schools Worth Choosing :: Learning Policy Institute | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"For many years, states and the federal government have been creating a range of schooling options for students, and the focus of the new Administration on expanding choice is likely to accelerate this trend. This report examines the status of current educational options for U.S. students and what state policymakers can do to create high-quality opportunities that offer each family a system of schools worth choosing."

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From Performance to Learning: Assessing to Encourage Growth Mindsets

From Performance to Learning: Assessing to Encourage Growth Mindsets | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Many teachers across the US and the world have embraced the Growth Mindset movement, recognizing that students need to know that there are no limits to students’ achievement (Boaler, 2016). But traditional educational practices often get in the way of the good work of teachers, undermining the growth mindset messages they give. Tracking and labelling students is one practice that leads to dangerous fixed mindsets among students (Romero, 2013), another, that will be the focus of this paper, is the ways students are tested and graded, especially in mathematics classrooms. We are fortunate at youcubed to be connected to thousands of innovative and caring teachers who read research and embrace change. In this paper we will share the work of three different high school mathematics departments who have successfully changed their students’ focus from one of performing to one of learning. We have chosen to focus on high schools as these are the places in which students often feel tremendous performance pressure, from frequent testing and grading, that causes them to lose their focus on learning and growth and replace it with a focus only on performing.

 

"The ideas and examples in this short paper go well beyond high school and are intended to help teachers of any grade level, from kindergarten to college. Research studies have consistently shown the benefits of a growth mindset culture and the drawbacks of frequent testing and grading (Boaler, 2015; Lemos & Verissimo, 2014; Dweck, 2006)."

 

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Introducing 4Fams: A New Resource to Help Parents Better Understand, Appreciate, and Engage With Their Child’s School | The 74

Introducing 4Fams: A New Resource to Help Parents Better Understand, Appreciate, and Engage With Their Child’s School | The 74 | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"...we’re thrilled to announce the launch of 4Fams — a new channel at The 74 specifically designed for our growing audience of families who want to better understand their school system. See our launch lineup at The74Million.org/4Fams.

Through a mix of articles, commentary, research analysis, first-person parent essays, and rapid-fire explainer videos (in both English and Spanish), 4Fams will make it easier for parents to search and share our resources. As educators, school leaders, and district administrators design new approaches to family engagement under ESSA, our hope is that these 4Fams resources can better equip parents to participate."

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Why America’s Black Mothers and Babies Are in a Life-or-Death Crisis - The New York Times

Why America’s Black Mothers and Babies Are in a Life-or-Death Crisis - The New York Times | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
From 1915 through the 1990s, amid vast improvements in hygiene, nutrition, living conditions and health care, the number of babies of all races who died in the first year of life dropped by over 90 percent — a decrease unparalleled by reductions in other causes of death. But that national decline in infant mortality has since slowed. In 1960, the United States was ranked 12th among developed countries in infant mortality. Since then, with its rate largely driven by the deaths of black babies, the United States has fallen behind and now ranks 32nd out of the 35 wealthiest nations. Low birth weight is a key factor in infant death, and a new report released in March by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the University of Wisconsin suggests that the number of low-birth-weight babies born in the United States — also driven by the data for black babies — has inched up for the first time in a decade.

Black infants in America are now more than twice as likely to die as white infants — 11.3 per 1,000 black babies, compared with 4.9 per 1,000 white babies, according to the most recent government data — a racial disparity that is actually wider than in 1850, 15 years before the end of slavery, when most black women were considered chattel. In one year, that racial gap adds up to more than 4,000 lost black babies. Education and income offer little protection. In fact, a black woman with an advanced degree is more likely to lose her baby than a white woman with less than an eighth-grade education.

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

 

This article is a must-read and, probably for most people, will come as a great shock. There is a thread that runs through this piece as well as

 

1.Christopher Edmin's Reality Pedagogy in his profound book For White Folks Who Teach in the Hood... and the Rest of Y'all Too...particularly in his notion of Cogenerative Dialogues

 

2. This articleExtensive Data Shows Punishing Reach of Racism for Black Boys; and

 

3. This articleWhy Students Learn Better When They Teach; and

 

4. This article about the "tutoria" strategy of student peer tutoring in Mexico, Reflections on the Role of Tutoria in the Future of Learning by Richard Elmore

 

The thread has to do with providing human services "in a global environment in which established institutions are progressively losing their authority and control [and their replacement] by forms of organization that we are just beginning to learn how to design....[This environment] shows many of the symptoms of a failed state enterprise, pre-occupied with servings its constituent interests and only episodically aware of its primary mission."*

 

The thread to which I refer seems to have as its foundation empathic trust. It appears to be the common factor that runs through so many stories of success in addressing failed or differential social outcomes that have discrimination at their root.

 

*Quotation from Richard Elmore in article #4, above.

 

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Teach kids creativity. Ultimately, machines will be better at coding. :: Wired

Teach kids creativity. Ultimately, machines will be better at coding. :: Wired | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Deep machine learning will likely automate the writing of code relatively quickly. Creativity is going to be far more important in a future where software can code better than we can"

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Google Puts the Pedal to the Metal for Rural Students With Expansion of Free School Bus Wi-Fi Into 12 More States | The 74

Google Puts the Pedal to the Metal for Rural Students With Expansion of Free School Bus Wi-Fi Into 12 More States | The 74 | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Kids in rural parts of the United States spend up to four hours a day on the road to and from school. When they finally get home, many have no access to high-speed internet. This double whammy leaves them in an academic and technological backwoods that’s a heartbreaking barrier to their job prospects in the 21st century.

"That’s why Google, in a continued push to bring these students up to speed, has expanded its Rolling Study Halls into 16 more rural districts across a dozen states."

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Appraisal: How Paymon Rouhanifard Rallied Camden Around Its Schools — and Why His Impressive Turnaround Will Endure | The 74

Appraisal: How Paymon Rouhanifard Rallied Camden Around Its Schools — and Why His Impressive Turnaround Will Endure | The 74 | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Camden Superintendent Paymon Rouhanifard informed New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy last week that he would be stepping down from his post at the end of the school year. As someone who has followed the trajectory of Camden Public Schools for the last decade, I’m sad about the loss of this gifted leader who relentlessly prioritizes the needs of schoolchildren above institutional stagnation. But I’m also confident that Camden’s rise in academic achievement will continue, because Rouhanifard’s reforms are deeply entrenched throughout the city."

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I Downloaded the Information That Facebook Has on Me. Yikes. - Brian X. Chen - The New York Times

I Downloaded the Information That Facebook Has on Me. Yikes. - Brian X. Chen - The New York Times | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

[You owe it to yourself to read this. Despite what I thought I knew, I found it harrowing. -JL]

 

"When I downloaded a copy of my Facebook data last week, I didn’t expect to see much. My profile is sparse, I rarely post anything on the site, and I seldom click on ads. (I’m what some call a Facebook “lurker.”)

"But when I opened my file, it was like opening Pandora’s box.

"With a few clicks, I learned that about 500 advertisers — many that I had never heard of, like Bad Dad, a motorcycle parts store, and Space Jesus, an electronica band — had my contact information, which could include my email address, phone number and full name. Facebook also had my entire phone book, including the number to ring my apartment buzzer. The social network had even kept a permanent record of the roughly 100 people I had deleted from my friends list over the last 14 years, including my exes.

"There was so much that Facebook knew about me — more than I wanted to know. But after looking at the totality of what the Silicon Valley company had obtained about yours truly, I decided to try to better understand how and why my data was collected and stored. I also sought to find out how much of my data could be removed.

"How Facebook collects and treats personal information was central this week when Mark Zuckerberg, the company’s chief executive, answered questions in Congress about data privacy and his responsibilities to users. During his testimony, Mr. Zuckerberg repeatedly said Facebook has a tool for downloading your data that “allows people to see and take out all the information they’ve put into Facebook.” (Those who want to download their own Facebook data can use this link.)

"But that’s an overstatement. Most basic information, like my birthday, could not be deleted. More important, the pieces of data that I found objectionable, like the record of people I had unfriended, could not be removed from Facebook, either."

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5 Ways to Increase The Wellness of Teachers –

5 Ways to Increase The Wellness of Teachers – | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Wellness is a hot topic these days. Educators are under more stress than ever before. It seems like every time we turn around, schools are in the news for all the wrong reasons: abuse, poor performance, scandals, violence, and crime. This list goes on and on. Working under these conditions can be very stressful on a teaching staff, as they have been tasked with curing our society’s ills by reaching out to one child at a time. These stressful conditions have led to teachers getting sick more often, taking leaves of absence for stress, and for some, quitting the profession all together.

Here are 5 ways administrators can help increase the wellness of teachers so that they can keep teachers happy, healthy, and willing to do this important work.
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Creative Problem Solving :: Adobe research report

Creative Problem Solving :: Adobe research report | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Creative problem solving is the process of redefining problems and opportunities, coming up with new, innovative responses and solutions, and then taking action.
Global research shows that tomorrow’s jobs will demand creative problem solving skills. We asked 1,600 higher and secondary educators, and 400 policymakers and influencers around the world to tell us about how students are being prepared to be creative problem solvers.
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The Data Tells All: Teacher Salaries Have Been Declining For Years | EdSurge News

The Data Tells All: Teacher Salaries Have Been Declining For Years | EdSurge News | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Economists following the teacher protests in Oklahoma, West Virginia, Kentucky and Arizona say they saw them coming. As the costs of living, higher education, healthcare and retirement continue to rise, the average pay for teachers has dipped. How do teaching careers compare to other college grad professionals? Do unions help? The data tells the story. "

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danah boyd: How Critical Thinking and Media Literacy Efforts Are ‘Backfiring’ Today | EdSurge News

danah boyd: How Critical Thinking and Media Literacy Efforts Are ‘Backfiring’ Today | EdSurge News | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
“Right now, the conversation around fact checking has devolved to suggest that there is only one truth. We have to recognize that there are plenty of students who are taught that there is only one legitimate way of thinking, one accepted worldview,” boyd said.

“Funders, journalists, social media companies and elected officials all say they want a ‘media literacy solution.’ I don’t know what it is, [but] I hope it’s not a version that’s just CNN versus Fox News,” she added.

By describing the goal of media literacy as a way to discover the truth, adults may actually reinforce the message that there is only one explanation, a strict, black-and-white line between what’s right and wrong. That thinking generally does not sit well for adolescents and young adults, who may be naturally inclined to challenge authority and seek alternative explanations, said boyd.
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The Power of Performance Assessments: Oakland Unified’s Graduate Capstone Project (Video) :: Learning Policy Institute

The Power of Performance Assessments: Oakland Unified’s Graduate Capstone Project (Video) :: Learning Policy Institute | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"In the Oakland Unified School District, a yearlong Graduate Capstone Project provides an opportunity for students to research, analyze, and become experts in a topic of their own choosing. LPI’s video shows how this complex project, which is used as a districtwide performance assessment, is building students’ ownership of their own learning and helping them develop and use critical thinking and communication skills."

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Ikea’s Plan To Leave The Big Blue Box Store Behind

Ikea’s Plan To Leave The Big Blue Box Store Behind | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Ikea is the biggest furniture retailer in the world–a title that the company has managed to hold on to, amazingly, without a serious digital presence. In the age of free Amazon same-day delivery, Ikea still does a vast majority of its sales through its physical stores.

Its commitment to digital is quickly increasing, though. People visited Ikea stores 936 million times last year, but they visited Ikea online 2.3 billion times. Meanwhile, the company debuted new ways to shop using AR and VR, partnered with the visual AI startup GrokStyle, and acquired the gig economy company TaskRabbit. In short, Ikea is acting more like a tech company than a furniture maker. And within the next few years, the way you think about shopping at Ikea will probably change entirely, as the company is aggressively pursuing a new, digital identity through its evolving wave of experimental apps.

“The business model of Ikea having a blue box in a cornfield, and you jump in the car with your family and have an ice cream [at the store], is not the only thing we should offer our customer,” says Michael Valdsgaard, leader of digital transformation at Ikea. “For the majority of people in the world, Ikea isn’t accessible. Apps can make Ikea accessible.”
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