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How Twitter is Reinventing Collaboration Among Educators

How Twitter is Reinventing Collaboration Among Educators | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

TWITTER TRANSFORMS EDUCATORS


Before the advent of Twitter, most educators I know had limited opportunities to collaborate with colleagues outside their building. Some subscribed to listservs or participated in online forums, but these outlets lacked critical mass; teachers also networked at in-person conferences and training sessions, but these isolated events didn't provide ongoing support.

 

Enter Twitter. I've heard many educators say that Twitter is the most effective way to collaborate and that they've learned more with Twitter than they have from years of formal professional development.

 

Here are some of the specific ways educators are using Twitter to collaborate:

 

Read more:

http://www.pbs.org/mediashift/2012/09/how-twitter-is-reinventing-collaboration-among-educators272.html

 


Via Gust MEES, João Greno Brogueira, Giselle Pempedjian, Aki Puustinen, Timo Ilomäki
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Sonia Thomas's curator insight, May 27, 2013 6:53 PM

Twitter provides a great opportunity to collaborate with educators outside of your local physical community. The exchange of ideas and perspectives can reenergize your career. “Twitter is often just the introduction — the virtual handshake that opens the door to a deeper collaboration”

:: The 4th Era ::
Impact of the internet age on human culture and education policy/administration
Curated by Jim Lerman
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Introducing this work

Introducing this work | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

For the purposes of this site, the history of human interaction with information may be divided into 4 eras. The first (spoken) era ended with the invention of writing around 3000-4000 BC. The second era ended with the invention of the printing press in 1440. The third era ended, and the fourth began, with the invention of the Internet (depending how one defines its operational beginning) somewhere between 1969 and 1982. We now exist early, but decidedly, in the fourth era.

 

All readers may not agree with this interpretation of the history of information, especially with the division and numbering of the eras. That is not the main point. Rather, it is that humankind presently exists in an era distinctly different from the one that preceded it -- that in fact, this new era is accompanied with, and characterized by, a new - and quite different - information landscape. This new Internet information landscape will challenge, disrupt, and overpower the print-oriented one that came before it. It will not completely obliterate that which preceded it, but it will render it to a subsidiary, rather than primary, level of influence.

 

Just as the printing press altered humanity's relationship with information, thereby resulting in massive restructuring of political, religious, economic, social, educational, cultural, scientific, and other realms of life; so too will the advance of digital technology occasion analogous transformations in the corresponding universe of present and future human activity.

 

This site will concern itself primarily with how K-20 education in the US, and the people who comprise its constituencies, may be affected by this transformative movement from one era to the next. All ideas considered here appear, to me at least, to impact the learning enterprise in some way. Accordingly, this work looks at the present and the future through a lens that is predominantly, but far from entirely, a digital one. -JL

 

Opinions expressed, scooped, or copied in this Scoop.it topic are my own, or a result of my own judgment, and should in no way be understood to reflect those of my employer.

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Margaret Waage's comment, June 20, 2013 7:43 AM
Jim - I like your perspective. Great subject matter here!
Margaret Waage's comment, June 20, 2013 7:46 AM
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Azania Nduli-AmaZulu UbuntuPsychology.ORG's curator insight, July 8, 2013 6:24 PM

Beautiful!

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These Four Thinkers Will Change Your Life – The Mission – Medium

These Four Thinkers Will Change Your Life – The Mission – Medium | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Nature is busy creating absolutely unique individuals, whereas culture has invented a single mold to which all must conform. It is grotesque. –Krishnamurti


"A word of warning — the discoveries of these four thinkers are not for the fainthearted.


If you’re interested in self-knowledge or smart self improvement, this will be the post for you!


The discoveries of these four thinkers have a similar message that runs through them:


You matter, and you can create as much purpose and meaning in your life as you choose."

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Selling Social-emotional Learning - DML Central

Selling Social-emotional Learning - DML Central | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Social-emotional learning has become a significant education policy priority and a key focus for education technology development and investment. The core idea behind social-emotional learning (SEL) approaches is that the “non-cognitive” aspects of learning are fundamentally linked to academic progress. Improving SEL skills is, therefore, seen as an important prerequisite for raising attainment. This simple idea has now begun to catalyze an outpouring of policy lobbying, ed-tech developments, and, importantly, new models of financial investment and profit-making. SEL, in other words, is being sold as a policy solution to long-standing educational problems, a potentially lucrative ed-tech market, and a rich commercial opportunity for investors.

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

When good, well-intentioned ideas result in high profit potential, what started out with clarity can become quite muddy.

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Teampedia - Tools for teams and teamwork

Teampedia - Tools for teams and teamwork | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Teampedia is a collaborative encyclopedia of free team building activities, free icebreakers, teamwork resources, and tools for teams.
This site is designed for group leaders, trainers, teachers, managers, directors, counselors, youth groups, camps, task forces ... anyone wanting to enhance collaboration and creativity.
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With teen mental health deteriorating over five years, there's a likely culprit

With teen mental health deteriorating over five years, there's a likely culprit | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Around 2012, something started going wrong in the lives of teens.

"In just the five years between 2010 and 2015, the number of U.S. teens who felt useless and joyless – classic symptoms of depression – surged 33 percent in large national surveys. Teen suicide attempts increased 23 percent. Even more troubling, the number of 13- to 18-year-olds who committed suicide jumped 31 percent.

"In a new paper published in Clinical Psychological Science, my colleagues and I found that the increases in depression, suicide attempts and suicide appeared among teens from every background – more privileged and less privileged, across all races and ethnicities and in every region of the country. All told, our analysis found that the generation of teens I call “iGen” – those born after 1995 – is much more likely to experience mental health issues than their millennial predecessors.

"However, according to the Pew Research Center, smartphone ownership crossed the 50 percent threshold in late 2012 – right when teen depression and suicide began to increase. By 2015, 73 percent of teens had access to a smartphone.

"Not only did smartphone use and depression increase in tandem, but time spent online was linked to mental health issues across two different data sets. We found that teens who spent five or more hours a day online were 71 percent more likely than those who spent only one hour a day to have at least one suicide risk factor (depression, thinking about suicide, making a suicide plan or attempting suicide). Overall, suicide risk factors rose significantly after two or more hours a day of time online."

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Three lessons from rigorous research on education technology - The Hechinger Report

Three lessons from rigorous research on education technology - The Hechinger Report | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
School district administrators and principals are inundated with salesmen peddling computers and software programs. Many claim that scientific research proves their wares work. Can they be believed? The researchers at the Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL), an organization inside the economics department of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, scoured academic journals, the internet …

Via Tim Boileau, Jim Lerman
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Tim Boileau's curator insight, September 26, 11:06 AM
Be sure to download the working paper "Education Technology: An Evidence-Based Review"
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how we learn – review

how we learn – review | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"How We Learn by Benedict Carey is focused mostly on memory and learning for recall but it is a good read and there is likely something new about learning here for anyone. Carey is a journalist who went through much of the research on memory in order to make sense himself. By synthesizing and comparing the research on memory and learning, he has done a great service to the non-academic.

One of the first principles discussed is how memory works: “Any memory has two strengths, a storage strength and a retrieval strength.”

 

'‘Yet there are large upsides to forgetting, too. One is that it is nature’s most sophisticated spam filter. It’s what allows the brain to focus, enabling sought-after facts to pop to mind … “The relationship between learning and forgetting is not so simple and in certain important respects is quite the opposite of what people assume,” Robert Bjork, a psychologist as the University of California, Los Angeles, told me. “We assume it’s all bad, a failure of the system. But more often, forgetting is a friend to learning” … Using memory changes memory — and for the better. Forgetting enables and deepens learning, by filtering out distracting information and by allowing some breakdown that, after reuse, drives retrieval and storage strength higher than they were originally.’

 

"Carey, paraphrasing Louis Pasteur, says that, “Chance feeds the tuned mind”. When we are tuned to a problem or topic, our mind sees more related cues. “When we are working on a paper about the Emancipation Proclamation, we’re not only tuned into racial dynamics on the subway car, we’re also more aware of our reactions to what we’re noticing.”

 

"Carey also debunks the power of focused repetition (drill & practice), upon which much formal education and training is based. The research he reviewed shows that ‘interleaving’ (mixing related but distinct material during study) is more powerful. “The mixing of items, skills, or concepts during practice, over the long term, seems to help us not only see the distinctions between them but also to achieve a clearer grasp of each one individually. The hardest part is abandoning our primal faith in repetition.” He concludes that interleaving is “preparing the brain for the unexpected”.


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Marta Torán's curator insight, November 13, 2:39 PM

La reseña del libro "How we Learn" de Benedict Carey escrita por Harold Jarche.


Muy interesante 

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6 Strategies For Dealing With ‘Difficult’ Students :: Allen Mendler

6 Strategies For Dealing With ‘Difficult’ Students :: Allen Mendler | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"While stress caused by common core concerns has dominated the recent education landscape, dealing with difficult students remains the number one source of constant tension for most teachers.

"Continual exposure to students who won’t behave or produce can quickly erode both confidence and well-being.

"...the guidance offered by six “pillars” can help you stay at the top of your game by dramatically influencing even your most challenging students to want to behave and achieve. Each pillar is explained followed by a few hands-on suggestions. Add or substitute other methods within each pillar to reflect your style and preference."

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The Future of Learning - PDF Version : The Paradigm Shift - MarkTreadwell.com

The Future of Learning - PDF Version : The Paradigm Shift - MarkTreadwell.com | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"This 200pp resource provides a window into the future of learning that is now urgently required in all schools - NOW! We need to prepare our young people for this century; a century where our learners are increasingly using YouTube to learn about what they need to learn, Just in Time; an era where our personal, social and work places are all experiencing enormous rates of change. How do we prepare learners a world that is increasingly complex; and one that is now demanding high levels of personal competency. 

"This journey begins with an emerging model for how our brain learns. Understanding this background provides us with the capacity to defining what the Learning process looks like (formally referred to as the inquiry process).  

"The human brain is extraordinary, but even more extraordinary is how little we have understood its capacity to learn. As humans, we alone have all four +(1) learning systems, allowing us to take our overwhelmingly rich sensory data to create knowledge and leverage that to build ideas and concepts and then apply those innovatively and ingeniously.

"The Learning Process harnesses this potential, allowing intelligence to be far more equitable than we ever imagined – "all learners are intelligent, and it is time everyone has the opportunity to fulfil the inherent potential that lays within."

"The physical copy of 'The Future of Learning' is accompanied with access to the electronic PDF version. The electronic version is updated every four months to ensure we are keeping you up to date with the very latest information on learning and how we can make that both relevant and equitable." 

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Volkmar Langer's curator insight, November 13, 1:55 AM
This journey begins with an emerging model for how our brain learns. Understanding this background provides us with the capacity to defining what the Learning process looks like (formally referred to as the inquiry process).
Fiona Leigh's curator insight, November 13, 1:52 PM
Another interesting read to remind to be future focussed 
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, November 14, 1:34 AM
Future of Learning
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Teachers: your guide to learning strategies that really work

Teachers: your guide to learning strategies that really work | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Research on effective learning reveals that an awful lot of what goes on in the classroom simply doesn’t matter. There are many pointless activities that take up valuable time in the name of engagement, merely demonstrating progress as opposed to actually making progress. Often, these approaches not only have limited impact on student learning but can have a hugely detrimental impact on teacher workload and wellbeing.

There is significant evidence to suggest that teachers should prune back what they do and focus on a more streamlined approach in the classroom. So it’s less about spending hours cutting things up and putting them in envelopes, and more about creating conditions in which students can gain long-lasting knowledge that can be applied in a range of situations. The following six principles are a distillation of key research on what really matters in the classroom."


Via John Evans, Mika Auramo, Jim Lerman
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Tera S. Ellis's comment, November 12, 10:52 PM
I agree that the strategy of reducing the cognitive load is not a good strategy for the gifted and talented students. I do believe that they will become bored and then become a behavioral problem within the classroom. Gifted students need a heavy cognitive load in order to challenge their learning and in order to push them to their full potential.
Ashley Hoyer's comment, November 16, 9:59 PM
@Tera S. Ellis You're right- it is possible that they could become a behavior problem. That makes me think of a child in my classroom- he hasn't been identified in our TAG program; however, I will be recommending him for next year. He tends to distract others and interrupt the learning of others quite possibly because he is completed and not being challenged enough.
Cheryl Turner's comment, November 16, 11:13 PM
Ashley and Tera , thanks for your comments but you are misunderstanding the definition of cognitive load. It doesn't have any thing to do with gifted learners not being stimulated. It has to do with the amount of information any person can handle focusing on at any one time. For instance, if you are trying to do a difficult math problem while listening to a challenging jazz riff or perhaps watch a movie at the same time, the cognitive load of those tasks in combination is going to be excessive. in that situation, you would not be effective at the math problem, because you have increased the cognitive load of the task. You have not increased the difficulty level of the task, in terms of its abstractness or the level of challenge for the mind trying to figure it out, but you have made the conditions less than optimal for that mind to operate on that task.
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Education Technology and the Twenty-First-Century Skills Gap

Education Technology and the Twenty-First-Century Skills Gap | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
All too often in many countries, students do not get the education they must have to prosper in the twenty-first century, and countries are not finding adequate numbers of the skilled workers they need to compete. But innovative education technologies are beginning to show potential in helping close the twenty-first-century skill gap.

Via Nik Peachey
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Nik Peachey's curator insight, October 25, 12:07 AM

Interesting and clear.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, November 9, 1:41 AM
Education Technology and the Twenty-First-Century Skills Gap
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, November 14, 4:15 AM
Education Technology and the Twenty-First-Century Skills Gap
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Massive tax haven data leak reveals financial secrets of world's wealthy — from Queen to Russian oligarchs

Massive tax haven data leak reveals financial secrets of world's wealthy — from Queen to Russian oligarchs | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
An enormous new leak of tax-haven financial records dubbed the Paradise Papers is laying bare financial secrets of the world's elite — including Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's chief fundraiser, three former Canadian prime ministers and more than 120 other politicians across the globe.

Via J. Steven Sprenger ✔
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GOP plan to tax college endowments like Yale's and Harvard's would be neither fair nor effective

Tucked away in the recently announced GOP tax bill is a small item you may have missed: a new tax on university endowments. As I have spent decades working in higher education, the proposal immediately piqued my interest.

Colleges create endowments by raising funds from alumni, companies and other donors, invest the money in stocks, bonds and other assets, and use the returns to fund student aid programs, professors’ salaries and any other expenses needed to run a college. Republicans want to slap a 1.4 percent tax on certain endowments’ investment income, also known as their returns.

Some college leaders are already howling at the proposal – and at several others in the tax bill targeting higher education – arguing it would threaten their autonomy and reduce support for poorer students.

Since tax revenue to run the government has to come from somewhere, I believe colleges and universities are fair game. To me, the questions that matter are simple: Is the tax itself fair? And would it be effective?
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Indian-Ed.Org | SINCE TIME IMMEMORIAL

Indian-Ed.Org | SINCE TIME IMMEMORIAL | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Via The Scout Report

 

"

INDIAN-ED.ORG: SINCE TIME IMMEMORIAL: TRIBAL SOVEREIGNTY IN WASHINGTON STATE
SOCIAL STUDIES

"Since Time Immemorial is a collection of curricular resources about Washington state and U.S. history that center on the history and perspective of tribal communities. These resources were designed by the Washington State's Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction and the Office of Native Education in collaboration with individual tribes and school districts. These resources include lesson plans for students in elementary, middle, and high school; educational videos; and links to helpful outside resources. While these resources were designed specifically for students in Washington state, some of these resources may be helpful when incorporating tribal perspectives into social studies classrooms across the United States. These lessons plans and resources are aligned with Common Core Standards and are designed to be easily incorporated into existing history and social studies curricula by providing tribal perspectives on topics and themes already addressed in U.S. history and world history classrooms. "

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It's better to understand something than to know it

It's better to understand something than to know it | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Without knowledge, understanding is impossible. But having knowledge doesn’t necessarily lead to understanding of a greater narrative, which is the real point of gathering information.

Via Nik Peachey, Jim Lerman
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Nik Peachey's curator insight, November 15, 4:12 AM

Well worth reading and considering.

Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, November 16, 1:11 PM
Understanding something is about gathering more information. Eloquent questions help understanding as we engage in dialogue, listening to others and letting text speak to us. We are curious.

John Dewey used the gerund of knowledge and growth, knowing and growing to propose that knowledge is fluid.
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Forbes’ 2018 ‘30 Under 30’ Came Early This Year. Here’s Who Made the Education List. - EdSurge News

When it comes to education, Forbes’ 2018 “30 Under 30” list might be summed up best as the year of the founder.

Most of the 38 honorees (cofounders are grouped together) are listed as entrepreneurs, though their companies—and backgrounds—are rather diverse.

Judging this year’s nominees were Charles Best (founder of DonorsChoose.org), along with Stacey Childress (CEO of NewSchools Venture Fund), Wendy Kopp (cofounder of Teach For All) and Joe Vasquez (codirector at Runway Incubator), himself an “Under 30” alum.

From ambitious founders of community nonprofits to a spoken word poet, here’s a look at who made this year’s “30 Under 30 Education” list.
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How to downgrade from macOS High Sierra back to macOS Sierra

How to downgrade from macOS High Sierra back to macOS Sierra | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
macOS High Sierra is the next major operating system for Mac — but just because you take a new operating system for a whirl doesn't mean you're ready to commit full-time just yet. If you've decided you'd rather return to macOS Sierra, you can downgrade with just a few steps. It is a bit of a complex process, but if you follow the steps you'll be back to your old setup in no time.
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Podcast - Michael Fullan part 1 – New Pedagogies for Deep Learning

Podcast - Michael Fullan part 1 – New Pedagogies for Deep Learning | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
NPDLConnect Podcast series Michael Fullan is a worldwide authority on educational reform. Michael “walks the talk” by leading our NPDL Partnership – a global endeavor to shift pedagogy and deepen learning  in over 1000 schools in 7 countries. A former Dean of the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) of the University of Toronto, Michael …

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Tim Boileau
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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, June 21, 12:16 PM
I agree with the point about overlooking teachers as a source of theoretical understanding about their own pedagogy. Fullan might feel he encourages policy makers and local school districts to use teachers as leaders. It isn't happening.

I am concerned about the use of catch phrases i.e. deep pedagogy and deep learning in this case. What do they mean in the day-to-day practice of teaching and learning?
Koen Mattheeuws's curator insight, June 22, 5:23 AM
Spits uw oren!
Bobbi Dunham's curator insight, June 23, 1:03 PM
Share your insight
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The Top 10 Elearning Analytics Statistics to Track

The Top 10 Elearning Analytics Statistics to Track | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Data dashboards and elearning analytics should be your best friend when prototyping elearning ideas & producing content. Here are the top 10 stats to track.

Via Marta Torán, Ricard Lloria
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Marta Torán's curator insight, November 13, 2:22 PM

Análisis de datos de eLearning.


 

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IBM says radical new ‘in-memory’ computing architecture will speed up computers 200 times

IBM says radical new ‘in-memory’ computing architecture will speed up computers 200 times | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

IBM Research announced Tuesday (Oct. 24, 2017) that its scientists have developed the first “in-memory computing” or “computational memory” computer system architecture, which is expected to yield yield 200x improvements in computer speed and energy efficiency — enabling ultra-dense, low-power, massively parallel computing systems.

 

Their concept is to use one device (such as phase change memory or PCM*) for both storing and processing information. That design would replace the conventional “von Neumann” computer architecture, used in standard desktop computers, laptops, and cellphones, which splits computation and memory into two different devices. That requires moving data back and forth between memory and the computing unit, making them slower and less energy-efficient.

 

The researchers used PCM devices made from a germanium antimony telluride alloy, which is stacked and sandwiched between two electrodes. When the scientists apply a tiny electric current to the material, they heat it, which alters its state from amorphous (with a disordered atomic arrangement) to crystalline (with an ordered atomic configuration). The IBM researchers have used the crystallization dynamics to perform computation in memory.

 

The researchers believe this new prototype technology will enable ultra-dense, low-power, and massively parallel computing systems that are especially useful for AI applications. The researchers tested the new architecture using an unsupervised machine-learning algorithm running on one million phase change memory (PCM) devices, successfully finding temporal correlations in unknown data streams.

 

“This is an important step forward in our research of the physics of AI, which explores new hardware materials, devices and architectures,” says Evangelos Eleftheriou, PhD, an IBM Fellow and co-author of an open-access paper in the peer-reviewed journal Nature Communications. “As the CMOS scaling laws break down because of technological limits, a radical departure from the processor-memory dichotomy is needed to circumvent the limitations of today’s computers.”

 

“Memory has so far been viewed as a place where we merely store information, said Abu Sebastian, PhD. exploratory memory and cognitive technologies scientist, IBM Research and lead author of the paper. But in this work, we conclusively show how we can exploit the physics of these memory devices to also perform a rather high-level computational primitive. The result of the computation is also stored in the memory devices, and in this sense the concept is loosely inspired by how the brain computes.” Sebastian also leads a European Research Council funded project on this topic.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, Javier Marrero Acosta
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Richard Platt's curator insight, October 26, 11:20 AM

IBM Research announced Tuesday that its scientists have developed the first “in-memory computing” or “computational memory” computer system architecture, which is expected to yield yield 200x improvements in computer speed and energy efficiency — enabling ultra-dense, low-power, massively parallel computing systems.  Their concept is to use one device (such as phase change memory or PCM*) for both storing and processing information. That design would replace the conventional “von Neumann” computer architecture, used in standard desktop computers, laptops, and cellphones, which splits computation and memory into two different devices. That requires moving data back and forth between memory and the computing unit, making them slower and less energy-efficient.  The researchers used PCM devices made from a germanium antimony telluride alloy, which is stacked and sandwiched between two electrodes. When the scientists apply a tiny electric current to the material, they heat it, which alters its state from amorphous (with a disordered atomic arrangement) to crystalline (with an ordered atomic configuration). The IBM researchers have used the crystallization dynamics to perform computation in memory.  The researchers believe this new prototype technology will enable ultra-dense, low-power, and massively parallel computing systems that are especially useful for AI applications. The researchers tested the new architecture using an unsupervised machine-learning algorithm running on one million phase change memory (PCM) devices, successfully finding temporal correlations in unknown data streams.

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Have Students Create Educational "Motivational Posters" with Google Drawings

Have Students Create Educational "Motivational Posters" with Google Drawings | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
We are all familiar with motivational posters. They typically have a black background, one large image at the top, then a word or short phrase in large type below it, and finally a short inspirational sentence at the bottom. These motivational posters have been around for decades, and most likely can still be found in the classrooms, libraries, and offices of your schools.

However, beyond just providing some encouragement to students, motivational posters can actually be used as a fun and educational activity. With some simple technology tools, students can create and share their own motivational posters. These creations can be used to show students learning and understanding of any concept being taught in your subject.

See below for some free templates, directions on how students can create the posters, and ideas for how this activity can be used in your class.
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Engaging Students' Interest, Not Just Offering Advanced Classes, Best Promotes Interest in STEM Careers

Engaging Students' Interest, Not Just Offering Advanced Classes, Best Promotes Interest in STEM Careers | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
A new study published in the journal Science Education finds that sparking students' interest in science at an early age is more effective at steering them toward eventual careers in the "STEM" fields – science, technology, engineering and mathematics – than pushing high school students into more advanced courses.

Via Sylvia Martinez, melindaannalford, Jim Lerman
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Courts side with Maryland HBCUs in long-standing case over disparities in state higher education

Courts side with Maryland HBCUs in long-standing case over disparities in state higher education | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
A federal judge this week ordered Maryland to remedy the lack of investment in the state’s historically black colleges and universities, in an effort to resolve a decade-old lawsuit over inequality in public higher education.

The state must establish a set of new, unique and high-demand programs at each historically black institution, the judge declared.

Since 2006, a coalition of alumni from Maryland’s four historically black institutions have been locked in litigation with the state to dismantle what they say are vestiges of racial segregation. The group says Maryland has underfunded Morgan State University, Coppin State University, Bowie State University and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore, and allowed other state schools to duplicate their programs, placing pressure on enrollment. Over the years, the coalition has called for increased funding and merging the University of Baltimore with Morgan State, the state’s largest public historically black school, to achieve parity.
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Digital learning

Digital learning | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
The report gives an overview of an expert consultation on the role and future of education and skills in the digital world. It looks at which skills are important and necessary to undertake the different types of jobs available, and what skills we need to be thinking of developing now and in the future.

Via Nik Peachey, Jim Lerman
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Nik Peachey's curator insight, November 3, 1:32 AM

An interesting ebook report.

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Endowments Boom as Colleges Bury Earnings Overseas :: NY TIMES

Endowments Boom as Colleges Bury Earnings Overseas :: NY TIMES | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"In 2006, the endowments of Indiana University and Texas Christian University invested millions of dollars in a partnership, hoping to mint riches from oil, gas and coal.

"A trove of millions of leaked documents from a Bermuda-based law firm, Appleby, reflects some of the tax wizardry used by American colleges and universities. Schools have increasingly turned to secretive offshore investments, the files show, which let them swell their endowments with blocker corporations, and avoid scrutiny of ventures involving fossil fuels or other issues that could set off campus controversy.

'Buoyed by lucrative tax breaks, college endowments have amassed more than $500 billion nationwide. The wealth is concentrated in a small group of schools, tilting toward private institutions like those in the Ivy League and other highly selective colleges. About 11 percent of higher-education institutions in the United States hold 74 percent of the money, according to an analysis in 2015 by the Congressional Research Service."

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ASCD Express 13.04 - Projects Without Borders: Divergent Problem Solving in PBL

ASCD Express 13.04 - Projects Without Borders: Divergent Problem Solving in PBL | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Project-based learning (PBL) and its cousin, problem-based learning, are as trendy as they are misunderstood. Even experienced educators dedicated to student-driven learning often feel pressure to forsake student agency in favor of projects that meet state standards, amuse students, and have a common goal. Too often, these projects have an established goal so concrete and specific that students' best chance for success is to comply with the teacher's intention and limit their creativity to artistic touches on the final product.


"What most of us associate with traditional schooling—a right-answer orientation, finding the "correct" solution to a given problem—is convergent thinking. In schools, convergent thinking runs rampant and does not always look like standardized tests. And it can even emerge in problem-based PBL when teachers prescribe the problem-solving projects so much that students practice critical thinking by deducing the most efficient route from a limited array of "choices."


"Convergent thinking isn't necessarily bad. But it is overused, and when used in PBL, it can pervert even well-intended assignments from their student-driven origins. With divergent thinking, on the other hand, there's no mainstream way to reach a learning goal—there are infinite possibilities.


"Divergent thinking in the classroom occurs when a teacher provides a prompt or challenge with guidelines and lets students determine the outcome. Work that requires divergent thinking is difficult to plan for, which frightens many an organized teacher. From "divergent" we get "diverse," a word which ably describes the wide range of outcomes in well-structured divergent PBL. As intimidating as this uncertainty may be, it is a hallmark of something spectacular. How do you know you are requiring the easier, safer convergent thinking? When you can easily envision success. Divergent thinking is as uncertain as it is audacious."

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