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Impact of the internet age on human culture and education policy/administration
Curated by Jim Lerman
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DOE/RAND Study Confirms Algebra Learning Doubles ~ Algebra Effectiveness

DOE/RAND Study Confirms Algebra Learning Doubles ~ Algebra Effectiveness | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"With the U.S. ranking 25th in international math scores, a panel of scientists and education experts on Capitol Hill recently hailed research so unique that only two percent of all U.S. Department of Education funded studies are similar. The study discovered that a Carnegie Learning curriculum doubled the amount of algebra learning typically experienced by high school math students. Moreover the results are extraordinary because experts believe school districts across the country could realistically replicate the success in their classrooms. Watch highlights of the panel here."

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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's comment, August 24, 2013 3:05 AM
GREAT RESOURCE! Thanks Jim...
Jim Lerman's comment, August 26, 2013 12:29 AM
Great to hear from you Bonnie. Hope you are doing well. I'm so glad you find good material on my posts.
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The $4 Million Teacher | Wall Street Journal

The $4 Million Teacher | Wall Street Journal | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

by Amanda Ripley

 

"Kim Ki-hoon earns $4 million a year in South Korea, where he is known as a rock-star teacher—a combination of words not typically heard in the rest of the world. Mr. Kim has been teaching for over 20 years, all of them in the country's private, after-school tutoring academies, known as hagwons. Unlike most teachers across the globe, he is paid according to the demand for his skills—and he is in high demand.


"Mr..Kim works about 60 hours a week teaching English, although he spends only three of those hours giving lectures. His classes are recorded on video, and the Internet has turned them into commodities, available for purchase online at the rate of $4 an hour. He spends most of his week responding to students' online requests for help, developing lesson plans and writing accompanying textbooks and workbooks (some 200 to date)."

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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, August 9, 2013 4:12 PM

I started teaching at a time when even a science fiction junkie couldn't come up with a 4 million a year teacher. Now it's possible. If stories like this don't get teachers building online curriculum.... I don't know what will! 

Judih Weinstein Haggai's curator insight, August 10, 2013 1:28 AM

not exactly gamification - but success breeds success - good feedback systems to parents and people are rewarded for their efforts.

 

 

vgpascal's curator insight, August 10, 2013 1:47 AM

Qui a dit que le métier d'enseignant payait mal ;-) ?

NB : à noter la répartition entre le temps du suivi des étudiants à distance par rapport aux activités "transmissives".

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Intelligence and Other Stereotypes: The Power of Mindset | Scientific American

Intelligence and Other Stereotypes: The Power of Mindset |  Scientific American | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

by Maria Konnikova

 

"Just as our mindset can hold us back, it can move us forward. Our mindset can change, and with it, our self-perception and our subsequent ability to take on various tasks. Women who are given examples of females successful in scientific and technical fields don’t experience the negative performance effects on math tests. College students exposed to Dweck’s theories of intelligence—specifically, the incremental theory—have higher grades and identify more with the academic process at the end of the semester. In one study, minority students who wrote about the personal significance of a self-defining value (such as family relationships or musical interests) three to five times during the school year had a GPA that was 0.24 grade points higher over the course of two years than those who wrote about neutral topics—and low-achieving African Americans showed improvements of 0.41 points, on average. Moreover, the rate of remediation dropped from 18% to 5%."

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