Texting and the decline in literacy
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Experts: texting helps kids to spell

Kids who contact each other via SMS could be better spellers according to new research. That's according to the University of Coventry's latest findings on c...
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Texting is good for us: Jeff Grabill at TEDxLansingED

It is commonplace to complain that the writing and communication problems of the present moment are caused by Twitter or Texting. And the national media cove...
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Texting 'can improve spelling' - BBC News

Texting 'can improve spelling' - BBC News | Texting and the decline in literacy | Scoop.it

"Children's unorthodox spelling and grammar while texting does not stop them learning the rules of formal English, suggests research.

Just over 160 children, aged between eight and 16, from the West Midlands, took part in the snapshot study.

 

The researchers compared spelling and grammar in formal tests and in text messages, at the start of the project and again after a year.

 

The results showed the most creative texters were among the best spellers.

 

The children were asked to copy out all their text messages over a two-day period."


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Texting 'can boost children's spelling and grammar'

Children's unorthodox spelling and grammar while texting does not stop them learning the rules of formal English, suggests research. Just over 160 children, ...
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Julie Bloor: Good texting is a useful skill to have

Julie Bloor: Good texting is a useful skill to have | Texting and the decline in literacy | Scoop.it
I AM sure that many people may have raised an eyebrow at the recent news that a study had showed how texting was good for children's spelling. After all, texting has been held up by some in the past...

Via Charles Tiayon
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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, June 21, 2014 6:08 AM

I AM sure that many people may have raised an eyebrow at the recent news that a study had showed how texting was good for children's spelling.

After all, texting has been held up by some in the past as another nail in the coffin of good English spelling and grammar.

In fact, according to a study by psychologists at Coventry University, the reverse is true. Of 160 children, aged between eight and 16, those of them who were the most creative with their texting were the ones who were, in fact, better at the more formal spelling and grammar.

This is an issue that I view with interest, but, thankfully, with no concerns – because experience tells me that there is no evidence to suggest the rise of texting leads to a decline in writing skills.

Even before mobile phones, young people have found their own unique ways of communicating with each other and it has not had an effect in the past. Suggesting that texting affects formal writing skills is like saying someone who has learned shorthand will eventually lose the art of formal writing, too, simply because they are writing everything in a prescribed way.

We spend plenty of time in English lessons teaching pupils that there are many different ways to communicate through the written word, and that the language and approach they would use while preparing a presentation is different from that which they would use when writing a CV, or a letter, for example. It all depends on their audience.

Texting is no different, and indeed, we discuss it, exploring how it can be useful for brevity when pupils are taking notes or writing a list for themselves.

As a result of this teaching, we do not have a widespread problem with students using text speak in essays or in their presentations; they are able to confine it to their mobile phones while recognising that it isn't suitable or appropriate elsewhere.

I do think that many people are concerned about possible problems with texting because, like modern pop music, they may not understand it. I do have to confess that my knowledge of text speak is extremely limited and is confined to "l8r" and "lol".

Otherwise, I am pretty mystified by it, but I recognise that many terms are ingenious and that text speak makes perfect sense in an age where we increasingly communicate electronically.



Read more: http://www.nottinghampost.com/Julie-Bloor-Good-texting-useful-skill/story-21272775-detail/story.html#ixzz35GcGR9I1

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Students' bad spelin blamed on txt spk - New Zealand Herald

Students' bad spelin blamed on txt spk - New Zealand Herald | Texting and the decline in literacy | Scoop.it
Students' bad spelin blamed on txt spk
New Zealand Herald
A research project which tested the spelling of 13- and 14-year-olds at six North Island schools found an alarming number of "catastrophic" spellers.
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OMG! Texting doesn't actually hurt kids' grammar or spelling skills

OMG! Texting doesn't actually hurt kids' grammar or spelling skills | Texting and the decline in literacy | Scoop.it
If anything, it seems to improve kids' language fluency

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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, July 14, 2014 2:22 PM

Texting has become the dominant form of communication among teens, with the average American teen sending and receiving thousands of texts each month. This has led towidespread concerns that the informal spelling and grammar used in texts (termed "textisms" by researchers) would erode these kids' ability to use proper language.

FOR CHILDREN AND TEENS, THERE AREN'T ANY CORRELATIONS BETWEEN USING MORE TEXTISMS AND DECREASED GRAMMAR SKILLS

Except, as it turns out, the data indicates that spending hours each day writing words and creatively manipulating language — as texting kids tend to do — doesn't actually reduce kids' formal spelling or grammar skills.

"There is, by now, a clear body of evidence," says Nenagh Kemp, a language psychologist at the University of Tasmania who's spent the past few years studying the topic, and recently published a new study on it. "Parents and educators need not panic that exposure to abbreviated and unconventional spelling and writing styles in digital communication will lead to the ruin of young people's conventional literacy skills.".

Kemp's new study is one of several showing that, for children and teens, there aren't any correlations between using more textisms and decreased performance on formal grammar and spelling tests over time. Indeed, there's even a slight correlation between textism use andincreases in test scores — suggesting that, counterintuitively, this sort of behavior might improve kids' mastery of written language.

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Texting improves children's spelling and grammar - Telegraph

Texting improves children's spelling and grammar - Telegraph | Texting and the decline in literacy | Scoop.it

Texting may improve children’s spelling and grammar because using abbreviations such as ‘gr8’ makes them think about language phonetically, a study found.

 

Scientists claim the research dispells myths that text messaging damages children’s grasp of the English language and found that when younger children use shortened words and abbreviations in messages it could actually improve their spelling.


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Because GMAT

Because GMAT | Texting and the decline in literacy | Scoop.it
The informal nature of grammar on social media may undermine your performance on some portions of the GMAT (Spelling Advice Because GMAT http://t.co/Q3h8VG7MHa #YOLO)...
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My View: Are electronic media making us less (or more) literate? – Schools of Thought - CNN.com Blogs

My View: Are electronic media making us less (or more) literate? – Schools of Thought - CNN.com Blogs | Texting and the decline in literacy | Scoop.it

Are new electronic media to blame for bad grammar and poor spelling? Is the texting culture and its corner-cutting approach to quick communication leading to the downfall of proper language skills? Educator and Modern Language Association director Kathleen Fitzpatrick diagrees, and here's why.


Via Steven Engravalle
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