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Oil Boom in Southern New Mexico Ignites Groundwater Feud With — Water Deeply

Oil Boom in Southern New Mexico Ignites Groundwater Feud With — Water Deeply | Texas Groundwater | Scoop.it

Drilling new water wells is strictly regulated in New Mexico, causing hardship for an oil industry that needs water for fracking. So groundwater is being piped across the state line from Texas, prompting worry over the shared aquifer.

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Electro-Purification seeks permit to sell groundwater in Hays Co.

Electro-Purification seeks permit to sell groundwater in Hays Co. | Texas Groundwater | Scoop.it

Texas regulators are considering granting a water vendor's request to pump up to 2.5 million gallons per day from the Trinity Aquifer.

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For El Paso And Ciudad Juarez, Managing Scarce Water Is Critical

For El Paso And Ciudad Juarez, Managing Scarce Water Is Critical | Texas Groundwater | Scoop.it

The cities share a border, and the Rio Grande as a source of drinking water.

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...and surface water.
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Texas Water Roundtable Presents Film Series On Water

Texas Water Roundtable Presents Film Series On Water | Texas Groundwater | Scoop.it

The Wye River Group, a nonpartisan, not for profit entity, is addressing awareness of challenges with public policy issues such as water, health and health care.

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A market solution to Texas’ groundwater woes?

A market solution to Texas’ groundwater woes? | Texas Groundwater | Scoop.it

Fracking has dramatically increased the demand for water in the nation’s most productive oil field, Texas’ Permian Basin. Water usage has already risen sixf

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Expect Frequent, Short Droughts To Become A Way Of Life In Texas

Expect Frequent, Short Droughts To Become A Way Of Life In Texas | Texas Groundwater | Scoop.it
To fend off the effects of drought, Texas will need conservation, infrastructure and new water sources.

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Wine grapes and cotton bring sustainability to Texas farm

Wine grapes and cotton bring sustainability to Texas farm | Texas Groundwater | Scoop.it

Sustainability is a buzzword that gets thrown around in a lot of conversations in agriculture these days.

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Director of San Angelo Water Utilities announces retirement

Director of San Angelo Water Utilities announces retirement | Texas Groundwater | Scoop.it

Bill Riley has been a water utilities professional for more than 30 years and took the San Angelo role in December 2014.

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A little local news!
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Study links groundwater with surface water in Devils River

Study links groundwater with surface water in Devils River | Texas Groundwater | Scoop.it

A Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) study provides detailed models linking groundwater in a Texas aquifer to the surface flows in one of the state's most pristine rivers. The study shows how karstic pathways of the Edwards-Trinit

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As the oil patch demands more water, West Texas fights over a scarce resource

As the oil patch demands more water, West Texas fights over a scarce resource | Texas Groundwater | Scoop.it

VAN HORN – A West Texas land baron and oilman is on the verge of pumping 5.4 million gallons of water a day from far under the desert mountains here and piping it 60 miles to the nation's most bountiful oil field, the Permian Basin, where hydraulic fracturing has fueled a renaissance of U.S. oil and gas production. With water in short supply and high demand, Dan Allen Hughes Jr., one of the largest landowners in the United States and president of his father's eponymous oil company, plans to tap an aquifer under his 140,000-acre Apache Ranch. [...] Hughes has run into a wall of opposition from West Texas farmers, ranchers, residents and environmentalists, who worry he will steal water from their cattle, dry up their crops and deplete the spring that feeds the famous pool at Balmorhea State Park. Hughes' project may well just be the start of a much larger fight - over the ownership of West Texas water, the future of oil and gas production and fate of agricultural lands and ecologically sensitive habitats. At least three other companies in the region are selling or planning projects to sell water to energy companies that use it by the billions of gallons to crack shale rock and release oil and gas. More than a decade ago, U.S. drillers began coupling two long-used oil production techniques, horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing, to revolutionize oil production, transforming the U.S. from an energy has-been to a key global producer. With crude prices still low - settling at less than $50 a barrel Tuesday - the Permian has become one of the few places where drillers can make money. Companies habitually bore horizontal shafts that run at least 10,000 feet - double the distance drilled four years ago - and pump 20 million gallons of water, or more, into each to produce longer, wider fractures in the shale. The seven-employee company plans to break ground on wells, catch basins and a 65-mile pipeline by the end of the year, and pump more than 8 million gallons a day for 20 years, about two or three percent of the estimated 2.3 trillion gallons in the aquifer. Layne Christensen, The Woodlands water and well company, has purchased an old cotton farm on 800 acres outside of Pecos, tapped the Pecos Valley aquifer, and, last week, finished a six-well, 4.2-million-gallons-a-day pipeline that runs 20 miles to the heart of the Delaware Basin. The family now owns 390,000 acres in Texas and Montana, including Apache Ranch, an expanse of white dirt, prickly pear and thorny mesquite surrounded by the rocky Apache Mountains northeast of Van Horn, and filled with game, including elk, pronghorn antelope and exotic aoudad sheep. In March, Hughes submitted an application to the Culberson County Groundwater Conservation District in the name of his new company, Agua Grande, asking to drill seven wells on the ranch and build a 60-mile pipeline northeast to the heart of Delaware, where 20 companies, including Anadarko Petroleum Corp. and EOG Resources, of Houston, and Concho Resources of Midland, are interested in buying the water, according to the application.

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Board approves Dan Hughes' West Texas water project

Board approves Dan Hughes' West Texas water project | Texas Groundwater | Scoop.it
A West Texas board unanimously approved an ambitious new project to drill into a desert aquifer near Van Horn, build a 60-mile pipeline and ship 5.4 million gallons of water a day from the Apache Mountains to the heart of the nation's most prolific oil field, the Permian Basin, to feed thirsty hydraulic fracturing operations. A West Texas board unanimously approved an ambitious new project to drill into a desert aquifer near Van Horn, build a 60-mile pipeline and ship 5.4 million gallons of water a day from the Apache Mountains to the heart of the nation’s most prolific oil field, the Permian Basin, to feed thirsty hydraulic fracturing operations. Ranchers, farmers, residents and environmentalists have protested the application vigorously, packing the project’s June hearing, sending the district dozens of letters, and again arguing on Wednesday that the project could steal water from cattle and crops, or dry up the famous spring-fed pool at nearby Balmorhea State Park. Several companies see a new market in the Permian, where water use in hydraulic fracturing operations has risen six-fold since the start of the shale oil revolution, from more than 5 billion gallons in 2011 to almost 30 billion last year. Hughes knew he had vast water reserves in the Capitan Reef aquifer under the desert mountains there and, not long ago, asked his staff to investigate ways to make money off the water.
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Wolfcamp Water Partners joins flow into West Texas water biz

Wolfcamp Water Partners joins flow into West Texas water biz | Texas Groundwater | Scoop.it
Wolfcamp Water Partners, a seven-employee Fort Worth start-up out of the offices of private oil and gas firm Vermilion Cliffs Partners, has leased 31,000 acres in the foothills of the Davis Mountains, drilled into the Capitan Reef aquifer, and looks to pump about 200,000 barrels, or more than 8 million gallons a day.. Wolfcamp Water Partners, a seven-employee Fort Worth start-up out of the offices of private oil and gas firm Vermilion Cliffs Partners, has leased 31,000 acres in the foothills of the Davis Mountains, drilled into the Capitan Reef aquifer, and looks to pump about 200,000 barrels, or more than 8 million gallons a day. Residents and politicians are encouraging oil and gas companies to use salty water, called “brackish,” for oil and gas production, saving fresh water for drinking and agriculture.
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Natural lakes in Texas hold many hidden treasures

Natural lakes in Texas hold many hidden treasures | Texas Groundwater | Scoop.it

[...] here in the middle of Lakes Appreciation Month, it seems fitting to offer an appreciation of these endemic waters - a rich, almost invariably achingly beautiful natural resource about which most Texas are unaware or painfully misinformed. The belief that the wonderfully gorgeous body of water on Big Cypress Bayou in the northeast corner of the state is Texas' only natural lake is one of those canards repeated so often most take it as fact. The log jam, named The Great Raft by Europeans who first encountered it as early as the late 1700s, created a natural dam, backing water behind it. Water from a swelled Big Cypress Bayou, which drained into the Red River, spilled into the low, swampy basin and created a lake - Caddo Lake - that covered as much as 30,000 acres. The lake - really, a reservoir now - is a magical place, a mix of open water interspersed with stands of cypress trees draped with Spanish moss, narrow channels through flooded cypress forest that opening into fairyland-like patches of open water covered with aquatic plants. Green Lake once was a tremendous natural resource, with its shallow waters filled with aquatic vegetation that drew clouds of wintering waterfowl and whose waters supported a thriving community of fish. The lakes are mostly what are known as oxbow lakes - bodies of water that once were part of river channels but left isolated when the river's flow shifted and left the section isolated. Below the surface, in water a deep green or sometimes the tannin-stained color of strong tea live a stunning diversity of fish, natives whose ancestors have lived in these waters for eons. Bowfins - "grinnel" to East Texans or "choupique" if you're close to the Louisiana border - hit and fight like aquatic berserkers and will take a chunk out of an unwary finger with their needle-sharp teeth. Some of the natural lakes accessible via their connections to rivers are public waters, although they are usually far from any public boat ramp and getting to them is more work than most people are willing to do. Natural lakes can be found on some state wildlife management areas and federally controlled national forests, national wildlife refuges and preserves.

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Texas SURFACE water!
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Aquifer district presents plan to harness EP

Aquifer district presents plan to harness EP | Texas Groundwater | Scoop.it

Almost 200 Hays County residents crammed into the Wimberley Community Center Monday to hear the Barton Springs Edwards Aquifer Conservation District’s (BSEACD) recommendation on a 2.5 million gallon per day pumping... #bartonspringsedwardsaquiferconservationdistrict #bryansmith #vanessaescobar

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The state(s) of our water: Eight states over the Ogallala come together for first Ogallala Water Summit

The state(s) of our water: Eight states over the Ogallala come together for first Ogallala Water Summit | Texas Groundwater | Scoop.it

When early explorers Zebulon Pike and Francisco de Coronado came upon the High Plains, they described it as a desert -- an impossible region to farm.Irrigation changed that. It allowed residents to pull water from the Ogallala Aquifer, and grow crops nearly anywhere. The first irrigation wells in Kansas were drilled east of Garden City in 1908.The Ogallala is a massive, underground sponge, spanning from South Dakota and Wyoming, down through the High Plains to west Texas and New Mexico.

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Groundwater district appeals ruling for Bastrop landowners

Groundwater district appeals ruling for Bastrop landowners | Texas Groundwater | Scoop.it

A group of Bastrop County landowners have hit a roadblock in their fight to stop the withdrawal o

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Front Range growth boom may tap defunct Colorado mountain gold mines — to get more water for people

Front Range growth boom may tap defunct Colorado mountain gold mines — to get more water for people | Texas Groundwater | Scoop.it

The hunt for more water to sustain the Colorado Front Range development boom has driven metro Denver suppliers to try to tap a new source: defunct mountain gold mines.

Sterling County UWCD's insight:
Pumping groundwater to help the environment?! 
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Rising groundwater damaging northeast Colorado homes

Rising groundwater damaging northeast Colorado homes | Texas Groundwater | Scoop.it
The PVC pipe snaking alongside Joanne Maes' house gives a little shudder, then two gurgles and a splash.
Sterling County UWCD's insight:
Here's a new problem.... RISING groundwater levels!
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Aquifer Storage: City of Buda green-lights pilot study

Aquifer Storage: City of Buda green-lights pilot study | Texas Groundwater | Scoop.it

Buda city leaders took another step toward implementing Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR) with the approval of a pilot study meant to test th

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Groundwater Districts unite for workshop

Groundwater Districts unite for workshop | Texas Groundwater | Scoop.it

The Middle Pecos Groundwater District (MPGCD) attended a mobile leadership training workshop hosted by the Texas Alliance of Groundwater Districts (TAGD) Monday, Nov. 6 at the Large Community Hall.  

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Water Technology Farms Could Give the Ogallala Aquifer a Reprieve

Water Technology Farms Could Give the Ogallala Aquifer a Reprieve | Texas Groundwater | Scoop.it

Now, a new type of operation is taking root in the southwest and northwest parts of the state called water technology farms.

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West Texas Groundwater Districts Scramble To Keep Up with Industry Demand

West Texas Groundwater Districts Scramble To Keep Up with Industry Demand | Texas Groundwater | Scoop.it
When rules for managing water were created in the '90s, no one expected brackish water to be a hot commodity.
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$213 million water project serving I-35 corridor to begin construction this fall | Community Impact Newspaper

$213 million water project serving I-35 corridor to begin construction this fall | Community Impact Newspaper | Texas Groundwater | Scoop.it

Aug 14, 2017: The fourth and final piece of a $213 million water development project was approved in July when the city of Buda committed to paying $10.86 million over t

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As the oil patch demands more water, West Texas fights over a scarce resource

As the oil patch demands more water, West Texas fights over a scarce resource | Texas Groundwater | Scoop.it
VAN HORN – A West Texas land baron and oilman is on the verge of pumping 5.4 million gallons of water a day from far under the desert mountains here and piping it 60 miles to the nation's most bountiful oil field, the Permian Basin, where hydraulic fracturing has fueled a renaissance of U.S. oil and gas production. With water in short supply and high demand, Dan Allen Hughes Jr., one of the largest landowners in the United States and president of his father's eponymous oil company, plans to tap an aquifer under his 140,000-acre Apache Ranch. [...] Hughes has run into a wall of opposition from West Texas farmers, ranchers, residents and environmentalists, who worry he will steal water from their cattle, dry up their crops and deplete the spring that feeds the famous pool at Balmorhea State Park. Hughes' project may well just be the start of a much larger fight - over the ownership of West Texas water, the future of oil and gas production and fate of agricultural lands and ecologically sensitive habitats. At least three other companies in the region are selling or planning projects to sell water to energy companies that use it by the billions of gallons to crack shale rock and release oil and gas. More than a decade ago, U.S. drillers began coupling two long-used oil production techniques, horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing, to revolutionize oil production, transforming the U.S. from an energy has-been to a key global producer. With crude prices still low - settling at less than $50 a barrel Tuesday - the Permian has become one of the few places where drillers can make money. Companies habitually bore horizontal shafts that run at least 10,000 feet - double the distance drilled four years ago - and pump 20 million gallons of water, or more, into each to produce longer, wider fractures in the shale. The seven-employee company plans to break ground on wells, catch basins and a 65-mile pipeline by the end of the year, and pump more than 8 million gallons a day for 20 years, about two or three percent of the estimated 2.3 trillion gallons in the aquifer. Layne Christensen, The Woodlands water and well company, has purchased an old cotton farm on 800 acres outside of Pecos, tapped the Pecos Valley aquifer, and, last week, finished a six-well, 4.2-million-gallons-a-day pipeline that runs 20 miles to the heart of the Delaware Basin. The family now owns 390,000 acres in Texas and Montana, including Apache Ranch, an expanse of white dirt, prickly pear and thorny mesquite surrounded by the rocky Apache Mountains northeast of Van Horn, and filled with game, including elk, pronghorn antelope and exotic aoudad sheep. In March, Hughes submitted an application to the Culberson County Groundwater Conservation District in the name of his new company, Agua Grande, asking to drill seven wells on the ranch and build a 60-mile pipeline northeast to the heart of Delaware, where 20 companies, including Anadarko Petroleum Corp. and EOG Resources, of Houston, and Concho Resources of Midland, are interested in buying the water, according to the application.
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West Texas Groundwater Site Added to Federal Superfund List

West Texas Groundwater Site Added to Federal Superfund List | Texas Groundwater | Scoop.it

KERMIT, Texas (AP) — The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has given a West Texas site a federal Superfund designation marking it as one of the most hazardous waste sites in the country.

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