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White Wolf: Teachings of the Seven Grandfathers

White Wolf: Teachings of the Seven Grandfathers | Nature | Scoop.it
The survival of wolf populations by teaching about wolves, their relationship to wildlands.Find beautiful Videos creations, photographie,wolf wisdom,quotes,wolf poetry,native american legends.

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52 million years ago, a rain forest grew on Antarctica

52 million years ago, a rain forest grew on Antarctica | Nature | Scoop.it

Drilling of the seabed off Antarctica has revealed that rain forest grew on the frozen continent 52 million years ago, scientists said Thursday, warning it could be ice-free again within decades. The study of sediment cores drilled from the ocean floor off Antarctica's east coast revealed fossil pollens that had come from a "near-tropical" forest covering the continent in the Eocene period, 34-56 million years ago. Kevin Welsh, an Australian scientist who traveled on the 2010 expedition, said analysis of temperature-sensitive molecules in the cores had showed it was "very warm" 52 million years ago, measuring about 68 degrees F.

 

"There were forests existing on the land, there wouldn't have been any ice, it would have been very warm," Welsh said. "It's quite surprising, because obviously our image of Antarctica is that it's very cold and full of ice." Welsh said higher levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere were thought to be the major driver of the heat and ice-free conditions on Antarctica, with CO2 estimates of anywhere between 990 to "a couple of thousand" parts per million. CO2 is presently estimated at about 395ppm, and Welsh said the most extreme predictions by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change would see ice again receding on Antarctica "by the end of the century.""It's difficult to say, because that's really controlled by people's and governments' actions," said Welsh, a paleoclimatologist from the University of Queensland.

 

"It really depends on how emissions go in the future." Welsh described the findings as "very significant" in understanding future climate change, particularly given how important Antarctica and the "very large" volume of water stored on its surface would be for the entire planet."It shows that if we go through periods of higher CO2 in the atmosphere, it's very likely that there will be dramatic changes on these very important areas of the globe where ice currently exists," he said.


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Jason, Charlie's curator insight, October 3, 2013 1:33 PM

This is represents the area and geography Antarctica.  This article explains that Antarctica had a rain forest grow in that part of the 34-56 million years ago.  Scientists say that this is an extraordinary find and that this could possibly happen in the next couple of decades.

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Woburn Safari Park hosting Save The Rhino's 'Stop Poaching Now' campaign - MKWeb

Woburn Safari Park hosting Save The Rhino's 'Stop Poaching Now' campaign - MKWeb | Nature | Scoop.it
MKWeb Woburn Safari Park hosting Save The Rhino's 'Stop Poaching Now' campaign MKWeb The attraction is supporting Save the Rhino International, who work to conserve populations of critically endangered rhinos in Africa and Asia, recognising that...

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Greer Noble's curator insight, September 6, 2013 8:24 AM

You could also help another way.. without it costing a cent.. see how here:

http://greernoble.com/non-fiction---invitation.html

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Tsunami Facts for Kids - Interesting Information about Tsunamis

Tsunami Facts for Kids - Interesting Information about Tsunamis | Nature | Scoop.it

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Most Beautiful And Amazingly Captured Wild Animals Photography | Bloggs74

Most Beautiful And Amazingly Captured Wild Animals Photography | Bloggs74 | Nature | Scoop.it

Today we have collected awesome collection of wild animal photography. The wild animal photography is an amazing and interesting subject for photographers and it’s one of the most difficult forms of Photography.


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35 Wonderful Photos of Animals Living in the Wild

35 Wonderful Photos of Animals Living in the Wild | Nature | Scoop.it

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Adelie Penguin Facts | 10 Amazing Facts about Adelie Penguins

Adelie Penguin Facts | 10 Amazing Facts about Adelie Penguins | Nature | Scoop.it
Penguins are the only avian order species that are not only flightless but are perfectly adapted for oceanic life. Unsurprisingly, their unusual adaptations and diving techniques have involved the ...

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BREAKING... Fukushima Disaster Leaves Hundreds of Whales Radiated to Death - National Report

BREAKING... Fukushima Disaster Leaves Hundreds of Whales Radiated to Death - National Report | Nature | Scoop.it

<National Report> On August 31st, four days ago the National Report ran the story… Fukushima Crisis Escalates Tons of Radioactive Waste Released into the Pacific Causes Ocean to Boil… http://wp.me/p3dd01-1QB. Since then we have been taking calls and emails from people all over the world wanting to confirm our story.

Two days after running the story we received an email from the World Nuclear Association, the mouthpiece of the nuclear industry who runs the website: www.world-nuclear-news.org, demanding we remove the story as it had resulted in a rush of people contacting this organization for more information. Per our policy however we refused to comply.

Due to the great deal of concerns and questions people have since the story broke and the fact that the world now knows that Japan has been anything but forthcoming with the truth the National Report sent it’s Editor-in-Chief Nigel Covington, to Fukushima to get to the bottom of the real Fukushima story.

New revelations coming out of Japan just days ago after the government took charge of this global emergency two years after the March 11, 2011 nuclear plant catastrophe it is clear that the government has intentionally failed to report the extent of the disaster to the people of the world. Nigel is in Fukushima now and we have received his first report on the disaster which follows.

 

<Fukushima> Reporting from the village of Fukushima I was shocked to find on my arrival that hundreds of whale carcasses were found along the beach early this morning which now extend up and down the shore as far as I can see.

The scene is absolutely devastating especially since no word of this latest crisis has been reported to the Japanese people or to the rest of the world. In fact the Japanese government has remained silent about today’s latest events.

Local residents claim they were told not to worry as the nuclear plant was brought under control shortly after the March 11, 2011 incident and there was little to no radiation concerns.

But what I’m hearing from experts and scientist here today is that they estimate 219,000 tons of nuclear waste has leaked into the Pacific Ocean over the past two years which up until 14 days ago TEPCO had kept a secret. After it was reported that at 300 tonnes (300 long tons; 330 short tons) of “heavily contaminated water” has been leaking from a storage tanks into the ocean daily. They also state the ground water in the region has been contaminated with high levels of radiation, but since the government stepped in to take control of the site relieving TEPCO the government has said little about the events taking place here.

It is an outrage for the government to remain silent. Two scientist I spoke to on the beach tell me maybe the government has been silent because no one can yet begin to image the impact this debacle will have locally as well as globally. Scientist on the site admit this is a major event but they too can only speculate on what will come tomorrow...

- See more at: http://nationalreport.net/breaking-fukushima-disaster-leaves-hundreds-whales-beached/#sthash.nRccUKCR.dpuf


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ThePlanetaryArchives - BlackHorseMedia - San Francisco's curator insight, October 5, 2014 5:04 PM

The "mainstream media" hasn't even mention Fukushima for over a year.....

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This Porpoise Slaughter Is Seven Times Bigger Than the Cove’s, So Why Haven’t You Heard About It?

This Porpoise Slaughter Is Seven Times Bigger Than the Cove’s, So Why Haven’t You Heard About It? | Nature | Scoop.it

Iwate, Japan, is once again poised to commence the world’s largest cetacean slaughter, which dwarfs the much more famous one in Taiji.


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How eating dog became big business in Vietnam

How eating dog became big business in Vietnam | Nature | Scoop.it

Every year, thousands of pets are snatched in Thailand, then smuggled into Vietnam, destined for Hanoi's top restaurants and street stalls. Kate Hodal investigates


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Once in a century floods due every ten years | Climate News Network

Once in a century floods due every ten years | Climate News Network | Nature | Scoop.it

Floods during the 21st century are expected to get worse. Really calamitous floods that, during the 20th century were considered once-in-a-century events could come round ever 10 years or so by the end of the 21st century, according to Japanese scientists.

 

Yukiko Hirabayashi of the University of Tokyo and colleagues report in Nature Climate Change that they looked at the likely pattern of hazard in 29 of the world’s great river basins. They considered the risk in those places where greater numbers of people were settled, and used 11 global climate models to project flood dangers by the end of this century.

 

They warn that the frequency of floods will increase in Southeast Asia, Peninsular India, eastern Africa and the northern half of the Andes of South America.

 

Conditions in northern and eastern Europe – the scene of recent and current calamitous flooding – could get less hazardous, along with Anatolia, central Asia, North America and southern South America.

 

The predictions, of course, come with the usual caveat: that the real exposure to flooding will depend to a great extent on what governments finally decide to do about greenhouse emissions, how much the world warms, what water management or flood control plans are put in place and on population growth in the regions at risk.

 

But those lower latitude countries where both population and economic investment are on the increase will have more at stake in the decades to come, and should prepare for greater flood risks.

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Peruun hätätila lumentulon takia

Peruun hätätila lumentulon takia | Nature | Scoop.it
Eteläamerikkalaisessa Perussa on julistettu hätätila useille alueille poikkeuksellisen runsaan lumentulon takia. Kaksi ihmistä on kuollut ja arviolta 33 000 perulaista on kärsinyt kylmyydestä ja lumisateesta.
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Ilmastopaneeli kertoo hälyttäviä uutisia Grönlannin sulamisesta

Ilmastopaneeli kertoo hälyttäviä uutisia Grönlannin sulamisesta | Nature | Scoop.it
Kansainvälinen ilmastopaneeli IPCC varoittaa aiempaa vakavimmista ilmastonmuutoksen seurauksista tuoreessa raportissaan.
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The Intriguing Ancient Underground City of Derinkuyu

The Intriguing Ancient Underground City of Derinkuyu | Nature | Scoop.it

Long ago, in the region surrounding Nevsehir and Kayseri, in central Turkey, an ancient people built, or rather dug, over 200 underground cities. The deepest of these, under the present day town of Derinkuyu, delves over 250 feet below the Earth’s surface, and boasts numerous tunnels, halls, meeting rooms, wells and passages.

Because the city was carved from existing caves and underground structures that had first formed naturally, there is no way to discern, with traditional archaeological methods of dating, when exactly Derinkuyu was built. As such, and with ties to the Hittites, Phrygians and Persians, Derinkuyu presents a fascinating riddle for ancient mystery enthusiasts.

Long ago, in the region surrounding Nevsehir and Kayseri, in central Turkey, an ancient people built, or rather dug, over 200 underground cities. The deepest of these, under the present day town of Derinkuyu, delves over 250 feet below the Earth’s surface, and boasts numerous tunnels, halls, meeting rooms, wells and passages.

Because the city was carved from existing caves and underground structures that had first formed naturally, there is no way to discern, with traditional archaeological methods of dating, when exactly Derinkuyu was built. As such, and with ties to the Hittites, Phrygians and Persians, Derinkuyu presents a fascinating riddle for ancient mystery enthusiasts.


Read more at http://www.todayifoundout.com/index.php/2013/09/intriguing-ancient-underground-city-derinkuyu/#QHWQFczIYSheStzG.99

Long ago, in the region surrounding Nevsehir and Kayseri, in central Turkey, an ancient people built, or rather dug, over 200 underground cities. The deepest of these, under the present day town of Derinkuyu, delves over 250 feet below the Earth’s surface, and boasts numerous tunnels, halls, meeting rooms, wells and passages.

Because the city was carved from existing caves and underground structures that had first formed naturally, there is no way to discern, with traditional archaeological methods of dating, when exactly Derinkuyu was built. As such, and with ties to the Hittites, Phrygians and Persians, Derinkuyu presents a fascinating riddle for ancient mystery enthusiasts.


Read more at http://www.todayifoundout.com/index.php/2013/09/intriguing-ancient-underground-city-derinkuyu/#QHWQFczIYSheStzG.99

Long ago, in the region surrounding Nevsehir and Kayseri, in central Turkey, an ancient people built, or rather dug, over 200 underground cities. The deepest of these, under the present day town of Derinkuyu, delves over 250 feet below the Earth’s surface, and boasts numerous tunnels, halls, meeting rooms, wells and passages.

Because the city was carved from existing caves and underground structures that had first formed naturally, there is no way to discern, with traditional archaeological methods of dating, when exactly Derinkuyu was built. As such, and with ties to the Hittites, Phrygians and Persians, Derinkuyu presents a fascinating riddle for ancient mystery enthusiasts.


Read more at http://www.todayifoundout.com/index.php/2013/09/intriguing-ancient-underground-city-derinkuyu/#QHWQFczIYSheStzG.99

Long ago, in the region surrounding Nevsehir and Kayseri, in central Turkey, an ancient people built, or rather dug, over 200 underground cities. The deepest of these, under the present day town of Derinkuyu, delves over 250 feet below the Earth’s surface, and boasts numerous tunnels, halls, meeting rooms, wells and passages.

Because the city was carved from existing caves and underground structures that had first formed naturally, there is no way to discern, with traditional archaeological methods of dating, when exactly Derinkuyu was built. As such, and with ties to the Hittites, Phrygians and Persians, Derinkuyu presents a fascinating riddle for ancient mystery enthusiasts.


Read more at http://www.todayifoundout.com/index.php/2013/09/intriguing-ancient-underground-city-derinkuyu/#QHWQFczIYSheStzG.99


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JERRY KITH's curator insight, January 15, 2014 3:13 PM

What baffles me is many ancient civilizations lack the resources (pneumatic tools, electric drills, bull-dozers, etc) to create such a magnicificant underground cities. Or perhaps, they did have access to modern-like tools. We have an assumption that they don't, but until the day we find concrete evidence, the question still remains a mystery in my mind. 

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Conservation efforts might encourage some to hunt lions, study finds

Conservation efforts might encourage some to hunt lions, study finds | Nature | Scoop.it
Some conservation initiatives designed to save lions from being hunted have either failed to work or in some cases appear to have incited East Africa's Maasai are shown on the hunt for lions in Kenya.

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Greer Noble's curator insight, August 31, 2013 3:46 AM

Born Free, born in Kenya foundation, needs our help. We've found a way.. and it won't cost you a cent! Here's how:  http://greernoble.com/non-fiction---invitation.html

 

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Surviving A Tornado

Surviving A Tornado | Nature | Scoop.it

[NOTE: This article is adapted from When Disaster Strikes: A Comprehensive Guide for Emergency Planning and Crisis Survival]
Who could not be shocked and saddened by the images of massive devastation left in the wake of recent tornadoes that struck in Oklahoma and Texas? Though nothing can guarantee absolute safety in the path of a tornado, outside of a shelter with reinforced concrete and steel walls, understanding something about the nature of tornadoes, safety tips for surviving a tornado strike, and which common folklore is to be trusted or ignored, will improve your chances for making the right decision when confronted by a tornado.


Via SustainOurEarth, Rachel Strauss
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Rachel Strauss's comment, July 8, 2013 11:22 PM
I think that this will give me insight if people really do know what to do in the event of a tornado. Is it that they don't have time or not listening to the warnings.
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Massive Earthquake, Tsunami Hit Japan - Teaching Kids News

Massive Earthquake, Tsunami Hit Japan - Teaching Kids News | Nature | Scoop.it
Last Friday there was a massive earthquake in Japan. It measured 9 on the Richter Scale, which is the scale that is used to measure how bad an earthquake is. This is the worst earthquake Japan had in 140 years, and they've had a lot of them.

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Stephen Taylor's curator insight, February 17, 2014 10:38 AM

To finish of our look at plate tectonics, earthquakes, and volcanos, here is a look at the Tsunami that hit Japan.  This report shows us the destructive power of a Tsunami and the damaged caused after it hit the main land of Japan.  Next time in class we will have an open discussion on Tsunamis, the Topic will be, 'Is the United States prepared for a Tsunami.'  Also, what State or States would be effected.

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13 Threatened Animals Of The Ocean (PHOTOS)

13 Threatened Animals Of The Ocean (PHOTOS) | Nature | Scoop.it
There are currently 620 species of marine animals designated as threatened on the International Union for Conservation of Nature's Red List.

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Endangered Species Facts | Top 6 Critically Endangered Species

Endangered Species Facts | Top 6 Critically Endangered Species | Nature | Scoop.it
Here are some of the rarely known endangered species facts. The crying need of the hour is to create a public understanding in the mind of the masses for the conservation of these species.

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Russia’s Far East prepares for flood peak

Russia’s Far East prepares for flood peak | Nature | Scoop.it

With thousands already affected, flooding in Russia’s Far East is expected to reach its peak next week as emergency workers and local residents step up efforts to tackle the disaster.

With thousands already affected, flooding in Russia’s Far East is expected to reach its peak next week as emergency workers and local residents step up efforts to tackle the disaster.   

The Amur River has burst its banks due to heavy rains, submerging over one million square kilometers of land in one of the largest floods ever to be seen in the country’s Far East.

Over 28,500 have been affected by the flooding which has struck the Amur Region, the Jewish Autonomous Region, and the Khabarovsk Region, according to the Emergencies Ministry.

A state of emergency has been declared in the three most heavily affected areas: the Jewish Autonomous Region, the Republic of Yakutia, and the Amur Region.  

Emergency workers have already evacuated over 13,000 people from flooded areas. However, many residents are determined to stay in their homes, refusing to abandon their property and belongings.  

“Obviously, it’s hard to part with your home and cattle, but it’s the human life which should remain a priority,” Oleg Kozhemyako, governor of the Amur Region, said.

"Force evacuation" will take place on Bolshoy Ussuriysky Island in the city of Khabarovsk if the “situation keeps deteriorating,” deputy head of the Khabarovsk Region, Andrey Volokzhanin, said, as quoted by RIA Novosti. Forty-five people permanently reside on the island.

There is concern that a heat power plant in Khabarovsk will be submerged.  There have also been reports of the flooding of cattle mortuaries which contain deceased livestock infected with anthrax and foot-and-mouth disease, with many believing that people’s health could be seriously at risk.

With the water level in the Amur River expected to reach an all-time record height of seven meters next week, authorities are quickly constructing sand dams. The local population is assisting emergency services and military troops in every way possible....


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Battered dogs get more empathy than adult humans: Survey : Postnoon

Battered dogs get more empathy than adult humans: Survey : Postnoon | Nature | Scoop.it

People have more empathy for battered puppies and full grown dogs than they do for adult humans, a US survey has found.

 

Jack Levin and Arnold Arluke, sociology professors at the Northeastern University, surveyed 240 men and women, most of them white and between the ages of 18 and 25, at a large northeastern university in the US.

Participants randomly received one of four fictional news articles about the beating of a one-year-old child, an adult in his 30s, a puppy, or a six-year-old dog, reports Xinhua.


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Celebrating World Day For Farmed Animals

Celebrating World Day For Farmed Animals | Nature | Scoop.it

Animal Equality is proud to support Farmed Animal Rights Movement (FARM) initiative to celebrate World Day for Farmed Animals.


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Marsin pinnalta löytyi vettä

Marsin pinnalta löytyi vettä | Nature | Scoop.it
Marsmönkijä Curiosity löysi vettä planeetan pinnalta otetusta näytteestä, jota kuumennettiin yli 800 asteeseen.
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WORLDWIDE: Study - Climate change not all bad for fish

WORLDWIDE: Study - Climate change not all bad for fish | Nature | Scoop.it

CORAL reef fisheries will be hurt by climate change in the tropical Pacific, but it could help tuna fishing and freshwater aquaculture thrive.

 

Pacific Island countries have an "extraordinary dependence" on fisheries and aquaculture, scientists say in a report on how changes to the atmosphere and ocean are likely to affect the food webs, habitats and stocks underpinning fisheries and aquaculture across the region.

 

"Maintaining the benefits from the sector is a difficult task, now made more complex by climate change," they say in Nature Climate Change on Monday.

"We found winners and losers.

 

"Tuna are expected to be more abundant in the east, and freshwater aquaculture and fisheries are likely to be more productive.

 

"Conversely, coral reef fisheries could decrease by 20 per cent by 2050 and coastal aquaculture may be less efficient."

 

The potential impact on invertebrates is "still poorly understood" but is expected to be more moderate.

 

The report from Australian and other scientists around the world says the potential benefits to the region from an eastward shift in skipjack tuna should exceed the threats.

 

They suggest that maintaining livelihoods in the region will require some income-earning activities to switch from coral reef fish to pelagic fish, particularly tuna.

 

Pelagic fish spend much of their lives in open water away from the bottom.

"Ironically in an archipelagic region, many of the extra jobs are likely to come from farming freshwater fish," the report says.

 

But a potential increase in freshwater fisheries could be negated if industries such as mining, agriculture and logging continue to pollute waterways, raising temperatures.

 

The onus is on governments, communities and their development partners to implement a range of supporting policies, the scientists say.

 

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Kylmyys aiheutti hätätilan Perussa

Kylmyys aiheutti hätätilan Perussa | Nature | Scoop.it
Ainakin seitsemän ihmistä ja kymmeniätuhansia eläimiä on kuollut. Lauantaina presidentti laajensi hätätila-aluetta.
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