Pilots: working in the clouds.
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Pilots: working in the clouds.
The lives of people dedicated to the advancement of flight.
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The Average Salary of Oil Rig Pilots

The Average Salary of Oil Rig Pilots | Pilots: working in the clouds. | Scoop.it
Around the world, the oil and gas industry employs more rotorcraft pilots than any other industry. Offshore, jungle, mountains or remote desert petroleum exploration or production locations rely on helicopter pilots to transport personnel and cargo.
John F Campbell's insight:

            When a worksite is located off shore, without a permanent connection to the mainland, the materials and personal need to be brought there via another means of transport. For that reason, oil and gas corporations currently employ more rotorcraft pilots than any other industry. These companies generally have plants in the oceans or in remote jungles or deserts where the only access is by helicopter. Oilrig pilots primarily transport personnel, equipment, and cargo to and from offshore rigs. Helicopters are also used to survey land that could be used for future drilling. These pilots fly in inclement and perilous weather conditions, both day and night. Whenever there is an accident on a rig or when extreme weather conditions are moving in, oil field helicopters are called in for ambulance missions or evacuating the site. To become an oilrig pilot, one must have perfect vision, excellent hearing, coordination, and reflexes. They must also be trained as physicians incase a passenger has been seriously injured. Most helicopter pilots are recruited from the military, having built up a number of hours, gaining valuable experience.  The average income of an Oil Rig Helicopter Pilot ranges from $45,000 - $89,000 a year. However, the top ten percent of pilots last year made more than $130,000. It is because of the men and women who fly these helicopters that we are able to drill for natural gas and oil around the world. Without people like them risking their lives everyday, the majority of the population would not be able to heat our homes or drive to work. 

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Fighter Pilot Job Description

Fighter Pilot Job Description | Pilots: working in the clouds. | Scoop.it
Fighter pilots are like the infantry of the sky, providing the firepower and brute force needed by military air operations.
John F Campbell's insight:

            Fighter pilots are some of the coolest people on earth; they are the soldiers of the sky, providing support and firepower to our men on the battlefield. By far the most important part of being a fighter pilot is the ability to master your aircraft, having complete control and understanding of the machine. Depending on what aircraft they are flying, pilots are trained in either air combat, where they simulate fighting other aircraft. Or air to ground combat, usually for aircraft designed to support units on the ground, providing cover and if needed overwhelming force. While not in the air, pilots are constantly training with their ground teams, making sure they are ready for flight at a moments notice. Seasoned pilots also spend time teaching young cadets the basics of airborne combat and evasive maneuvering. A pilot’s squadron on the ground is responsible for making sure that his plane and equipment are ready for use 24/7. The pilot is responsible for keeping watch over his squadron, making sure that everyone is completing his or her tasks. Staying in shape is also very important for fighter pilots. At high speeds these pilots are exposed to harsh changes in G and direction, which could easily cause harm to a person’s body if not prepared. The average salary of a fighter pilot is $55,000 a year. The days of mid-air dogfights are long gone, however, fighter pilots are still very much alive and well, protecting their country and her people every day. 

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Experimental Test Pilot: Inside Jobs

Experimental Test Pilot: Inside Jobs | Pilots: working in the clouds. | Scoop.it
Learn about an Experimental Test Pilot career! Check out the job description, job outlook, salary, and how to become an Experimental Test Pilot.
John F Campbell's insight:

           Before a plane is put into service, it has to pass certain regulations and mandatory safety tests. The men and women who are responsible for testing these planes first hand are called Experimental Test Pilots. Their job is to fly experimental aircraft and aircraft prototypes, usually for the military or commercial plane manufacturers. Throughout their tests, the pilots record the data and write reports on how the plane felt up in the air. Although the pilots spend most of their time sitting down in the cockpit of the planes, their job is still quite stressful. They have to push the aircraft to its limit, exposing any potential dangers or malfunctions that could endanger the future passengers. Some of the most common areas in which a test pilot would focus are; speed, stability, reliability, safety, strength, and performance of the aircraft. Not only are these pilots responsible for flying the prototypes, they also play key roles in designing the different tests that the planes will undergo. The average salary for an Experimental Test Pilot, in the United States, at the moment is $35,000 - $120,000 a year. Although these men and women are placed in possibly very dangerous situations everyday, unlike aerobatic stunt pilots, these people are not looking for the thrill of a near death experience. These pilots risk their lives for the safety of others; the future passengers and pilots of the planes they are testing. 

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Peter Burke's comment, April 1, 2013 8:55 PM
I was honestly never truly sure whether or not I believed in test pilots. Obviously the thought of testing a prototype plane, however, is not a surprising one. After having read this fine article by John Campbell, I have gained a greater appreciation for the people I did not even know existed. These men and woman are the ultimate dare-devils. Flying planes that have never been flown before -- and not just flying them but testing them to the edge. I am glad that I chose to read this article by John Campbell because I have learned about an occupation that I never really knew about, yet a very important one. I happen to fly fairly often and so therefore I am very grateful to the brave men and woman who risk their own lives for the safety of oblivious passengers like myself. If John Campbell ever plans to take on this job he would always have my absolute, unquestionable appreciation.
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Jobs As a Coast Guard Helicopter Pilot

Jobs As a Coast Guard Helicopter Pilot | Pilots: working in the clouds. | Scoop.it
The U.S. Coast Guard is one of the five branches of the U.S. armed forces. While the other branches are within the Department of Defense, the Coast Guard is part of the Department of Homeland Security.
John F Campbell's insight:

            Amongst the many testing jobs that can be found in the United States Coast Guard, flying the USCG’s helicopters is by far the most dangerous. Coast Guard helicopter pilots have all graduated from university, and are some of the most skilled pilots in the Navy. The main CG air stations are located on the water’s edge, in places like Alaska, Hawaii, the Great lakes, and the US territories in the Caribbean. The most common use of these helicopters is for search and rescue. Whether a boat capsizes or someone is thrown overboard in a storm, the pilots are always on call and ready. Besides S&R, these pilots also spend their time patrolling the coast and protecting the waterways. Helicopter pilots are on call 24 hours a day and will fly in almost every type of condition. Once an officer, the training to become a USCG Pilot is almost 20 months long. The salary of the men that risk their lives to save others ranges from about $60,000 to $80,000. Every year young seamen make the decision to apply to the USCG helicopter program while in their first three years of service. The men and women, who pass this course, are some of the bravest people found in the Armed Forces. These sailors put their lives on the line every day, conscious of the fact that they may not be on the helicopter ride home. 

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Job Description of a Police Helicopter Pilot

Job Description of a Police Helicopter Pilot | Pilots: working in the clouds. | Scoop.it
Police departments on foot or driving vehicles are limited by street-level surveillance and what they can observe on the ground.
John F Campbell's insight:

            The use of helicopters by police departments nationwide has made it easier for officers to pursue suspects, as well as drastically lower the response time to a crime scene. Helicopter pilots are often called upon during emergencies, when police need to locate someone in a vast area. Helicopters also provide support to officers on the ground in pursuit of a suspect or stolen vehicle. When needed, fire departments have called on seasoned police helicopter pilots to assist in extinguishing forest fires from the air. Life as a pilot for the police can be stressful at times. They are under constant pressure, flying around as fast as possible, exposed to loud noises, harsh elements, and all kinds of danger. Pilots do not have a set work schedule and many have to work through the night. In order to become a Police Helicopter Pilot, one must have an extensive knowledge of a range of aircrafts as well as an understanding of the equipment onboard. Pilots must complete police reports and they must be able to communicate with other officers while flying. The average salary of a police helicopter pilot in the United States ranges from $50,000 - $85,000 a year. Pilots are a key piece of every Police Department’s arsenal, responsible for tracking down and pursuing suspects when vehicles cannot.

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Monique Clare Balderson's curator insight, July 24, 2015 12:32 AM

It has been my dream since I was a child to be able to learn how to fly a helicopter or plane. Firstly I will have to make the requirements but within the next 10 years I hope to achieve this set goal. Police Helicopters Pilots are one of the best ways to catch any one that is a suspect on the ground and my lifetime goal is to try and make the world a safer place to live in and if becoming a Police Helicopter Pilot is the way to do it then that’s what I will do. 

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Airline pilot: Job description | Prospects.ac.uk

Airline pilot: Job description | Prospects.ac.uk | Pilots: working in the clouds. | Scoop.it
John F Campbell's insight:

            When we hear the word “pilot”, we immediately think of the two men at the front of a plane who spend the whole flight cooped up in the cockpit, coming over the intercom once or twice, and then seeing us off, once we land, as we pass by on our way out. However, becoming an airline pilot is the highest sought-after job in aviation, and there is a long path one must take before they can fly us home from our summer holiday. Airline pilots fly both passengers and cargo, such as mail and packages, for large and small companies around the world. Two pilots, the captain and co-pilot always operate an aircraft, taking turns with the controls as to avoid weariness. On some very long distance flights, a third or even fourth pilot may be onboard to relieve the other two if necessary. The captain of the aircraft is responsible for the safety of everyone on board and must constantly check the weather for any possible dangers ahead. Due to the fact that a pilot’s salary can be influenced by the type of plane he flies, for whom he flies, and his rank in the airline, the range of salaries for airline pilots varies significantly, from about $25,000 – upwards of #250,000. However, it is rare for a pilot to make more than $150,000 in a year. Pilots are men and women who go unnoticed, slipping in and out of the plane virtually unseen, and disconnected. Nonetheless, these people are responsible for our lives and for making sure that we return home to our families. 

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Stunt Pilot: Inside Jobs

Stunt Pilot: Inside Jobs | Pilots: working in the clouds. | Scoop.it
Learn about a Stunt Pilot career! Check out the job description, job outlook, salary, and how to become a Stunt Pilot.
John F Campbell's insight:

By definition, a Stunt Pilot is someone who has been trained in aerobatics, the practice of using aircraft for airborne stunts. They are typically the people who can be seen flying loop-de-loops over crowds in the summer. During these shows the pilots complete a combination of flips and spins, utilizing the wind and draft of other planes to do so. While watching these shows it is easy to forget that these are highly explosive machines flying very close to one another right above your head. Although currently most aerobatics are done for show, they started in the military as a way to prepare for mid-air dogfights. However, recently companies such as Red Bull have begun to monetize the sport by sponsoring air shows for the public’s entertainment. Part time stunt pilots generally fly purely for recreation, not as their occupation. A full time pilot, however, travels around the world, promoting their sponsors, preforming for large audiences at shows and special events. The salary of a professional stunt pilot in the United States ranges from approximately $35,000 - $120,000. In the past few decades, air shows have become a very popular form of entertainment. Groups such as the Blue Angels, USN, and the Red Arrows, RAF, were formed to promote the armed forces of the United States and England. 

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