Wearable Technologies
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Rescooped by Peter Hylton from Virtual Reality - Oculus Rift
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What is the Oculus Rift?

What is the Oculus Rift? | Wearable Technologies | Scoop.it
The virtual reality experience long promised in science fiction is finally becoming a reality with the Oculus Rift. Here are the facts.

Via Will Bergan
Peter Hylton's insight:

OVERVIEW

This article provides an extensive overview of the Oculus Rift technology. It covers multiple topics in a FAQ style, and assumes no prior knowledge from the reader.

 

DATE

26 March, 2014: Very recent and therefore likely to be up-to-date information.

 

CREDIBILITY

 The authors Kevin Ohannessian and Michael Andronico are published by the website Tom’s Guide, which is part of a larger tech publication network called Bestof Media. While the presence of multiple authors and the professional look of the site are good credentials, there is a chance that a large site publishing many articles may not spend a lot of time checking each one. No sources are provided by the authors.

 

AUDIENCE

The title ‘What is the Oculus Rift?’ indicates that this is an article aimed at those with little or no knowledge of the technology who are just after an overview. As Tom’s Guide is a tech site, readers are likely to have an interest in technology.

 

COVERAGE

The article provides extensive information for readers hoping to increase their general knowledge of the Oculus Rift. As it is intended for people relatively new to the technology, it would not be appropriate as technical documentation for developers.

 

OBJECTIVITY

The article appears to be fair and objective.

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Will Bergan's curator insight, March 18, 2014 1:56 AM

Oculus Rift. A virtual reality headset being designed currently for pc only, no console supported as of yet. It is still being designed through the help of developers such as gearbox software and valve. These are possibly the two most important developers to be working on such a project with as Gearbox are responsible for the Unreal gaming engine and Valve are the creators of Steam. If the Oculus Rift gets designed specifically to suit these two developers, who knows where it will end up!

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The future of wearables: 8 predictions from tech leaders - CNET

The future of wearables: 8 predictions from tech leaders - CNET | Wearable Technologies | Scoop.it
Top executives from ARM, Broadcom, Intel, Freescale, MediaTek, and Qualcomm weigh in on what's ahead for the market.
Peter Hylton's insight:

OVERVIEW

This article makes predictions about trends within and the state of the wearable market in general, based off interviews with tech company executives. The article is set out into several topics based around statements from the executives. There are good extrapolations of statements given by tech executives, and the topics are kept suitably general and relevant.

 

DATE

3 February, 2014: Very recent and therefore likely to be up-to-date information.

 

CREDIBILITY

The author is a reporter for cnet, a large tech news site that specializes in the latest tech developments. The professional look and scale of the site are good credentials, but there is a chance that a large site publishing many articles may not spend a lot of time checking each one. The sources for the article are executives within well-known tech companies: ARM, Broadcom, and Intel, to name a few. It should be noted, however, that the title of the article refers to future predictions, and the information should be taken accordingly.

 

AUDIENCE

Readers of cnet are likely to have an interest in the latest personal technologies.

 

COVERAGE

The article covers a very broad spectrum of wearable technologies from watches and glasses to clothing.

 

OBJECTIVITY

The article comes to its own conclusions about the possibilities for the wearables market, but this is appropriate as it is a predictions article.

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Microbullets reveal material strengths

Microbullets reveal material strengths | Wearable Technologies | Scoop.it
Researchers at Rice and MIT analyze the effects of projectile impacts at the nanoscale to make better body armor for soldiers and materials for aerospace applications.
Peter Hylton's insight:

OVERVIEW

This article covers technology that may be used for protective wear in the future. Researchers invested the effectiveness of a copolymer at dissipating bullet impacts at the nanoscale level. The material performed surprisingly well, and this has possibilities for gear such as bulletproof vests.

 

DATE

30 October, 2012: Less than two years old. The material may be relevant, but there is also the possibility that there is deeper research elsewhere.

 

CREDIBILITY

The author is a senior media relations specialist at Rice University, where the research was carried out. As part of an academic organisation he is likely to be a credible source. His main source is the paper written by the students involved in the research, which was publish in the journal Nature Communications. The research was also supported by the U.S Army Research Office.

 

AUDIENCE

The article is published on the Rice University website, and the paper was published in the multidiscipline journal. The research is likely only to be found by those looking for research on related topics, but the article is written in a general and simple way and is intended to be understood by anyone.

 

COVERAGE

The article provides a broad overview of the technology and practical applications for it. It translates statistics into real-world terms in an attempt to give the reader a better understanding, but the associated research paper is likely to go into more technical detail.

 

OBJECTIVITY

The article appears to be fair and objective, and references a peer-reviewed journal paper as its main source.

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Interview with Ben Moir from Wearable Experiments | Wearable Technologies

Interview with Ben Moir from Wearable Experiments | Wearable Technologies | Wearable Technologies | Scoop.it

 

 

Peter Hylton's insight:

OVERVIEW

This article is an interview transcript with Ben Moir from Wearable Experiments. The topic is the Alert Shirt, the latest innovation from the company. The shirt was designed while partnering with Foxtel, and is intended to simulate the feelings and experiences of AFL players during a game. The interviewer gets an overview of the product, its features and the thinking behind it.

 

DATE

19 March, 2014: Very recent and therefore likely to be up-to-date information.

 

CREDIBILITY

The author is a project manager for Wearable Technologies, a ‘worldwide market development platform for technologies worn close to the body, on the body or even in the body’. As they are a recognised group that specialises in wearables, their credibility is good. The source for the article is one of the technology developers, Ben Moir.

 

AUDIENCE

The audience for this article would be anyone who follows the Wearable Technologies group.

 

COVERAGE

The article describes the features of the Alert Shirt briefly before going on to talk about inspirations, the fan base and sales opportunities. There is no in-depth description of the low-level technology and how it drives the shirt.

 

OBJECTIVITY

The article records and interview with one of the developers of the technology, so there may be a slight bias. The responses he gives do seem to be informative rather than a sales push, however.

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Google reveals Android Wear, an operating system for smartwatches

Google reveals Android Wear, an operating system for smartwatches | Wearable Technologies | Scoop.it
Google is officially getting into wearables. The company has announced Android Wear, a version of the operating system designed specifically for wearable devices. To start with, the system is made...
Peter Hylton's insight:

OVERVIEW

An article that reports on the release of Android Wear, an operating system designed for wearables.

 

DATE

18 March, 2014: Very recent and therefore likely to be up-to-date information.

 

CREDIBILITY

The author is a reporter for the website The Verge, on which the article is published. The site is part of a larger publishing organization, Vox Media. The professional look and scale of the site are good credentials, but there is a chance that a large site publishing many articles may not spend a lot of time checking each one. Sources for the article seem be unspecific, or links back to other articles from the same site. Google’s Senator Vice President of Android and Chrome, Sundar Pichai, is quoted once.

 

AUDIENCE

As The Verge is intended to be “the intersection of technology, science, art, and culture”, it is likely that the intended audience is broad.

 

COVERAGE

The article is mostly a summary of the announcement of the new OS, but it also mentions future directions and affiliate companies who would be making devices that use the technology.

 

OBJECTIVITY

Although the article is just an overview of the technology announcement, it uses mostly links to other articles on its own site. The information appears to be correct and objective though.

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Rescooped by Peter Hylton from Tech Gadgetry
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Whistle brings wireless wearables to man's best friend

Whistle brings wireless wearables to man's best friend | Wearable Technologies | Scoop.it

"Wearables needn’t just be for humans: startup Whistle wants $100 to track man’s best friend, and the eponymous Whistle dog collar add-on is how it plans to do it. Collecting details of different types of activity, resting periods, and other information, Whistle pushes it not only to a companion app on your smartphone, but into the cloud where a timeline of the dog’s behavior and routines can be monitored."


Via Mo Hall
Peter Hylton's insight:

OVERVIEW

This article provides an overview of Whistle, a wearable technology for dogs that allows their owners to track and record activities and goals.

 

DATE

5 June, 2013: Recent and fairly likely to be up-to-date.

 

CREDIBILITY

The author Chris Davies is the executive editor for Slashgear, the site that publishes the article. As Slashgear is a long-standing (since 2005) independent source of tech news, the credibility of this article is good. The main source of information is the official Whistle website.

 

AUDIENCE

Readers of this article are likely to have an interest in the latest personal technologies.

 

COVERAGE

The article proves a good overview of the technology and its uses, but nothing too specific.

 

OBJECTIVITY

As the main source for this article is the official website of the technology, there may be a slight bias. However, the information given is general and seems objective.

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AR Wear - Confidence & Protection That Can Be Worn

AR Wear - Confidence & Protection That Can Be Worn | Wearable Technologies | Scoop.it
A clothing line offering wearable protection for when things go wrong.
Peter Hylton's insight:

OVERVIEW

The crowdfunding project page for AR Wear, a clothing line that is intended to help prevent sexual assault. The site provides an overview of the product, the research behind it, and video demonstrations.

 

DATE

Start date 13 October 2013: Recent and fairly likely to be up-to-date.

 

CREDIBILITY

The page was created by the founders of AR Wear, the company that developed the technology. Although they are not affiliated with any other companies, the professional approach to their product gives them some credibility. A research article from the Criminal Justice and Behavior journal is provided as justification for their technology.

 

AUDIENCE

The intended audience is people interested in new inventions and innovation, who are willing to donate money to ideas they support. Because of this, the page does lose some of its objectivity.

 

COVERAGE

The page addresses the purpose and research behind the technology, as well as providing photo and video demonstrations of the technology in use. Shortcomings and limitations are not mentioned, however.

 

OBJECTIVITY

As the purpose of this page is to obtain crowdfunding, there may be a slight bias in the information presented.   

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New Wearable Antenna Could Aid in Health Monitoring - LiveScience.com

New Wearable Antenna Could Aid in Health Monitoring - LiveScience.com | Wearable Technologies | Scoop.it
LiveScience.com New Wearable Antenna Could Aid in Health Monitoring LiveScience.com A new, flexible antenna that can stretch and bend with a person's movement could be used in wearable health monitoring devices, say the researchers who designed the...
Peter Hylton's insight:

OVERVIEW

Provides information about a new, flexible antenna that could help with the relay of information from wearable health monitors.

 

DATE

26 March, 2014: Very recent and therefore likely to be up-to-date information.

 

CREDIBILITY

The author is published by the website LiveScience, which is part of a larger tech publication network called Tech Media Network. The professional look and scale of the site are good credentials, but there is a chance that a large site publishing many articles may not spend a lot of time checking each one. The main source for the article is an interview with one of the inventors from North Carolina State University.

 

AUDIENCE

Based on the website, the intended audience is likely to have in interest in technology, science and health.

 

COVERAGE

The article provides a good explanation and overview of the technology as well as an indication of where the researchers are going to head in the future to improve it.

 

OBJECTIVITY

As much of the information in the article is in the form of quotes from one of the researchers, there may be a slight bias. However, the information given is general and seems objective.

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