tesol
13 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Emilie Hoogewerff
Scoop.it!

Bilingual/Bicultural Books for the K-8 Classroom

Bilingual/Bicultural Books for the K-8 Classroom | tesol | Scoop.it
Emilie Hoogewerff's insight:

I found this article particularly applicable to TESOL. It has titles of many books that incorporate other languages and cultures in them and how to apply them in the classroom. This year I took a class entirely devoted to children's literature and incorporating it in the classroom. I think that when it comes to all students, especially English learners in the classroom, it's important to still adress and value their language/culture. In an area like College Park where there's a vast majority of Latino students, it's valuable to have books like these in the classroom.

If you teach only English books and try to teach your students English strictly through books, it may de-value these students culture and give them the idea that it's not worth learning or understanding. I think a lot can be learned from incorporating both languages in text such as these books. The students can not only learn a new language, but they get the mental and emotional support that will only help them learn that much more. 

Providing books that bilingual students can actually read and understand will also result in a love of reading and promote these students to read more. If you try to teach a bilingual student strictly through English books that they don't understand, they may end up resenting reading, which could be detrimental to their learning. This really goes along with my idea of "meeting in the middle" learning approach (read more about later).

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Emilie Hoogewerff
Scoop.it!

Embracing ‘today’s diverse schoolhouse’ | NIU Today

Embracing ‘today’s diverse schoolhouse’ | NIU Today | tesol | Scoop.it
Mayra Daniel understands more than many the importance of colleges and universities equipping teachers with the necessary skills to teach and design ef...
Emilie Hoogewerff's insight:

Understanding the education system at NIU through this article was eye opening. Throughout my curations I've come to the realization that ESOL is such a growing and demaning field because there are so many students who immigrate here from other countries and don't speak English at home. Shouldn't this call for change nation-wide in our teacher preparation education classes? I think NIU has the right idea by requiring their education majors to take classes such as "Methods and Materials for Teaching English Language Learners in the Content Areas." 

If we've done the research and understand the data and the fact that the majority of students will be ESOL students then shouldn't we tailor our teacher preparation programs to reflect this growing need? The article says, "The Illinois State Board of Education now requires that all teacher candidates across the university enroll in at least one course focused on educating English Language Learners." I think this should be a minimum requirement for all education majors. Even if you're not an TESOL major and intending on teaching solely ESOL students, the facts are in the numbers: it is more likely than not that you will have an ESOL student in your classroom. Because of this, isn't it imperative that all teachers have at least basic knowledge of the learning needs of ESOL students so that they can help them? 

The more I think about it the more obvious this seems, but I wonder why it's not implemented in more teacher preparation courses, even at Maryland.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Emilie Hoogewerff
Scoop.it!

Slam Poet Wants To Change The Way You Think About ESL Education

Slam Poet Wants To Change The Way You Think About ESL Education | tesol | Scoop.it
The statistics regarding education for English as a Second Language Learners (ESL) in America are bleak and abstract: According to George Washington University Face the Facts initiative, there is only one public school teacher for every 150 ESL...
Emilie Hoogewerff's insight:

I absolutely love this video because I think it touches upon all the flaws that exist in the ESOL curicculum and expectations in the country. The passion in Dylan Garity's voice is so inspiring that it entices you to listen. I was so shocked that he felt so strongly about the ESOL system in the country yet he isn't even a teacher. 

I think this video highlites the fact there there is a huge crack in the system- students do fall behind and many ESOL curicculums are doing nothing about it and sometimes even pushing students further away from succeeding. This saddens me but also empowers me to be that much better of a teacher for these students.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Emilie Hoogewerff
Scoop.it!

Direct Method of Teaching English | Blog About ESL

Direct Method of Teaching English | Blog About ESL | tesol | Scoop.it
The Direct Method of Teaching English is a way that learners acquire the English language. Developed over 100 years ago, this method is still widely used today.
Emilie Hoogewerff's insight:

I thought this was a nice basis to show how ESOL first began being taught. It really just talks about drilling vocabulary into the students head. I'm glad it addresses this methods shortfalls because clearly there is more to the English language than vocabulary. I think the biggest downfall of this method is that it fails to integrate grammar into it. As a French speaker the biggst different I notice is the format of sentence structure. In French the adjective (usually) comes after the noun, however, it's the opposite in English. This method fails to acknowledge that. My dad was an immigrant child- he moved to the US from Holland when he was 14 (in 1968) and says that this method is the extent of which ESOL was incorporated in his classroom which goes to show thatjust conversing and being forced to naturally learn the language may be more effective. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Emilie Hoogewerff
Scoop.it!

Why Demand For Spanish-Speaking Teachers Is Increasing

Why Demand For Spanish-Speaking Teachers Is Increasing | tesol | Scoop.it
The demand for Spanish-speaking teachers is increasing in urgency: As schools scramble to adapt curricula and classes to a changing population, it’s more critical than ever that teachers can communicate in two languages.
Emilie Hoogewerff's insight:

I was immediatly drawn to this article when I read, "Research reported by the Washington Post showed that having a Hispanic, bilingual teacher not only helped ELs comprehend academic material, but increased attendance and graduation rates among that group, as well." If this study has been shown and this is known, shouldn't we we make it a priority to have teachers that can connect with their students on their cultural level so that we can do everything in our power to get these students to graduate.

I feel like TESOL programs are basically teachers helping students adjust to American culture by forcing them to adapt to English. Why can't teachers meet in the middle and help students adapt to our culture by helping them understand the parallels that exist between English and their native language. I think if schools set up workshop days once in a while to help teachers learn their ESOL student's language and cultures it would be beneficial to the student's learning. If you have a Spanish speaking student and you're trying to help them understand that "I have 10 years" (Yo tengo 10 años) translates to "I am 10 years old" they will have a better understand of the language as a whole and the verb usages rather then just telling them to regurgitate proper English. I think great value can come from this "meeting in the middle" teaching method.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Emilie Hoogewerff
Scoop.it!

Acquiring English as a Second Language: What' s Normal and What' s Not

Acquiring English as a Second Language: What' s Normal and What' s Not | tesol | Scoop.it
Emilie Hoogewerff's insight:

This article addresses the quickyl growing number of bilingual students in the classroom and then brings up the idea, "what is normal?" It's projected that in the near future, the majority of students in American will be students learning English as a second language- is this the new normal? And what is the normal manner in which these students learn and understand English? I think this article is extremely valuable in understanding how these students think, feel, and learn. 

The article addresses the fact that many students who just learn in different ways/at a different pace are immediatly subjected to SLP's or Speech-Language Pathologists. Can't this even more so hurt the students in their mental state? Students who are struggling to understand English as a second language are then being told that they need to work with a speech pathologist cannot be helpful to their emotional learning. 

I learned about different aspects of the students learning experience such as code switching, interference, and language losss. One aspect, silent period, was particularly intersting to me. It discusses the idea that a new English learner initially has a period of silence when they are digesting and taking in this entirely new language. While focusing on listening and understand it, they speak as little as possible. Is this where students are then deemed the need to work with a SLP? Just because they are not making any vocal progress intially doesn't mean there is a need for a SLP or that they aren't making any progress at all. 

What I took away most from this article is that it's so important to be patient when working with ESOL students. It may come quickly to them, or it may come slowly. It may take different ways of teaching for them to understand English. But deeming them as incompetent of learning English and needing a speech pathologist seems like the last thing to do as it can have detrimental emotional effects on these students. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Emilie Hoogewerff
Scoop.it!

Straight Outta China: Learning English Through Slang Is In Demand

Straight Outta China: Learning English Through Slang Is In Demand | tesol | Scoop.it
Some California institutions are helping people learn English as a second language by teaching hip-hop and slang terms.
Emilie Hoogewerff's insight:

I found this article extremely insightful and valuable. I think that teaching ESOL students slang is extremely useful to the students because it helps them feel more accepted and involved in modern day culture. We don't walk around talking to each other the same as we do when writing an essay- which is how we are taught in school. Conversational Enligsh is learned, it is a process, so exposing students to this type of slang English is extremely valuable. In many of my education courses we talk about how there is no "right" or "correct" way to speak- that it is important as a teacher to recognize and accept students many cultural backgrounds. I think Mayeux sumarrizes this and the importance of teaching slang when he says, "So the English that a rapper or hip-hop artist uses is no better or worse than what a university professor is using."

I've never heard of courses like "street talk" being taught. I think this is a really relevent and innovative way to help ESOL studnets adjust into American culture and something I want to look into more. 

more...
No comment yet.