Bratsholme Food Forest Farm
645 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Terry Calhoun
Scoop.it!

Bratsholme Permaculture Tree Farm

 

About Bratsholme Farm— We're on ~21 acres of land, five miles from the University of Michigan's central campus. We're learning about permaculture as we redesign and expand our 9-hole disc golf course to a 27-hole course, meanwhile reforesting 10–12 acres of open, recently farmed land into a tree-based permaculture farm. 

Terry Calhoun's insight:

As we find useful resources related to our farm, permaculture, or productive trees, we will try to share them here. This is for us, and also for whomever else finds it useful.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Terry Calhoun
Scoop.it!

Contract manufacturing for food processing businesses | Queensland Government

Contract manufacturing for food processing businesses | Queensland Government | Bratsholme Food Forest Farm | Scoop.it
Find out how to engage a contract manufacturer or provide contract manufacturing services in your Queensland food processing business.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Terry Calhoun
Scoop.it!

GREEN NUTS (JUNE)

GREEN NUTS (JUNE) | Bratsholme Food Forest Farm | Scoop.it
Seller of green walnuts, red walnuts, and regular walnuts which are very pure, fresh, and insecticide-free. Grown on a family farm in its 2nd quarter-century. Provides recipes, tips, and walnut storage.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Terry Calhoun
Scoop.it!

Cedar Apple Rust - Plant Insect, Disease and Environmental Problem Information from PlantsGalore.Com

Cedar Apple Rust - Plant Insect, Disease and Environmental Problem Information from PlantsGalore.Com | Bratsholme Food Forest Farm | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Terry Calhoun
Scoop.it!

Lancaster Farming - Lancaster Farming

Lancaster Farming - Lancaster Farming | Bratsholme Food Forest Farm | Scoop.it
ITHACA, N.Y. — When Johanna Brown and Silas Conroy were working at Stick and Stone Farm near Ithaca, N.Y., they had many conversations about farming, and the development of business models that would fill the needs of the local food system.
“We wanted to have our own farm, but didn’t want to compete with our friends, so we decided to make prepared food out of local produce,” said Johanna Brown.
Thus came the birth of the first community-supported kitchen (CSK) in the area, which they named Crooked Carrot. A CSK goes beyond the idea of community-supported agriculture (CSA), where a member buys into a share of a farmer’s harvest.
With a CSK, a member is buying into the prepared food made from those CSA vegetables. The CSK delivers locally produced products made with local vegetables (raised sustainably, within a 30-mile radius). In the case of Crooked Carrot, the products are sauces, dressings, soups, broths, dips, prepared beans and live-culture pickles.
Their website, crookedcarrotcsk.com, was designed by business partner and Johanna’s husband, Jesse Brown, and allows for online ordering and flexibility. CSK members can order as they go, or purchase Crooked Carrot credit in chunks of $150 and have purchases deducted. The products are delivered every other week alongside CSA shares at its distribution sites.
The business started in 2011, and is based at a rented kitchen at Stick and Stone Farm. Currently, there are three partners in the business, Johanna Brown, Jesse Brown and Silas Conroy, along with one part-time employee. They intentionally started the business in such a way that they wouldn’t have to make any huge up-front investments.
“We used some savings and got some small loans from friends and family, but we’ve survived mainly by investing lots and lots of sweat equity,” said Johanna Brown.
The profits from the business are used to buy more equipment. They invested in two more tables for food preparing last year, which provided more processing space. This year they bought a food processor that allows them to puree large quantities of tomatoes, apples and other foods much more efficiently.
The Groundswell Center for Food and Farming and the Alternatives Federal Credit Union Business Cents program, two organizations located in Ithaca, helped with Crooked Carrot’s business plan and continue to be a helpful resource as the business evolves, Johanna Brown said.
The kitchen at Stick and Stone Farm was almost ready to be licensed when Crooked Carrot started renting.
“It had a range, refrigerator and a three-bay sink. We helped clean it up, and fixed up a few things, and then we applied for our 20C processing license from the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets,” said Johanna Brown. She said that the regulations were confusing and overwhelming but that the inspector was a great resource in navigating all the rules. Her advice to anyone getting into the food-processing business is to “develop a good relationship with your inspector.”
Name is everything. “Carrots are one of our favorite vegetables,” said Johanna Brown about the CSK’s name, “And we liked the metaphor of crooked carrots being ones that have run into some kind of obstacle and found a way to grow around it.”
The kitchen recently took the Farmers’ Pledge of the Northeast Organic Farming Association of New York — a pledge that describes a farm’s sustainable practices — hence Crooked Carrot’s produce comes from either a certified organic farm or another farm that has taken the Farmers’ Pledge.
The CSK portion of the business currently has about 40 members who buy credit and get a 10 percent member discount. Some items, like the smoked pepper-squash soup and the tomatillo black bean stew, are only available to CSK members. The sauces and dressings, which include maple-tamari dressing; smoked jalapeño hot sauce; tomato-basil sauce; raw, live-culture pickles; and the most popular pickle, Baek kimchi, are available in select stores, markets, restaurants and to CSK members.
“We sell at farmers markets too. This has been a great way for us to get more direct contact with our customers and get immediate feedback about our products,” said Johanna Brown.
Until recently, the main part of their business was the CSK, but now their wholesale business makes up the largest part of the income. When it comes to determining the wholesale price, Johanna Brown said that they calculate it partly on how much the products would be marked up by distributors and retailers, and try to make sure the end price to the customers would still be reasonable.
“We want to make sure that our products sold at Greenstar Coop in Ithaca, N.Y., for example, are still within range of our farmers market prices, but not less than our prices, so that people still have some incentive to buy directly from us,” she said.
Customers are mostly within New York state, with a few customers in Pennsylvania and Massachusetts.
“As our goal is really to be feeding local food to local people, we never want to be shipping food to California,” she said.
She admits that with the business and a 10-month-old son, they are often sleep deprived.
Sales seem to indicate that people really like and want Crooked Carrot products. In 2013, they retailed 135 cases of pickles alone along with 60 gallons of bulk pickles to restaurants. This year, they have already retailed two-and-a-half times as many cases and sold more than twice as many pickles to restaurants. There are direct sales too, where they market between five to eight cases of pickles per week to their CSA and farmers market customers.
Johanna Brown said pickles make up the bulk of their business.
“Our products cost more than the mass-produced equivalent, but we hoped that people will consider it worth it when they realize it is made from scratch with fresh local ingredients, and that the farmers are getting a fair price for their produce,” she said.
Purchased directly from them, a 16-ounce jar of pickles is $6.50, with kimchi being a bit more expensive. They wholesale their products in cases of 12- and 16-ounce jars.
“The exact profit margin varies by product,” said Johanna Brown, “but I believe we have something like a 40 percent margin for direct sales (not factoring in extra labor to go to market, etc.), and more like a 10-20 percent margin for wholesale.”
“Part of our long-term vision is to be able to provide ourselves and five-10 employees with a living wage and benefits,” she added.
Being involved with education and community building is also part of the long-term vision for Crooked Carrot. It has been partnering with the Youth Farm Project, trading food for their labor.
“It’s been wonderful to have young farmers working with us, learning about how the food they’re growing is processed, and bringing lots of energy to the kitchen!” she said.
“We’ve been very lucky to have so much help and support from Stick and Stone (Farm), and many others in the community.”
Helen M. Griffiths is a freelance writer in south-central New York.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Terry Calhoun
Scoop.it!

Chinese Walnut Trading Website Lists Single Pair For $31,000

Chinese Walnut Trading Website Lists Single Pair For $31,000 | Bratsholme Food Forest Farm | Scoop.it
BEIJING, Aug 28 (Reuters) - China is trying hard to revive interest in its ailing stock market, but some investors are instead shelling out big money on an asset they can hold in the palms of their hands - walnuts.

With more traditional investment...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Terry Calhoun
Scoop.it!

Episode 144: Walnuts

Episode 144: Walnuts | Bratsholme Food Forest Farm | Scoop.it
Today we take a walk down the wild side through nutty Oklahoman pasts while Molly and Matthew fall under the spell of black walnut magic. RIP nutcrackers. spilledmilkpodcast.com     ...
Terry Calhoun's insight:

good comments

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Terry Calhoun
Scoop.it!

Small producer case study: gourmet pickled walnuts | Department of Agriculture and Food

Small producer case study: gourmet pickled walnuts | Department of Agriculture and Food | Bratsholme Food Forest Farm | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Terry Calhoun
Scoop.it!

Air Drying Wood with Endgrain Sealers

Air Drying Wood with Endgrain Sealers | Bratsholme Food Forest Farm | Scoop.it
Air drying wood with green wood and endgrain sealers. Application tips for solid wood blanks and woodturning roughouts are included.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Terry Calhoun
Scoop.it!

Fungi Perfecti - Fungi.com

Fungi Perfecti - Fungi.com | Bratsholme Food Forest Farm | Scoop.it
Fungi Perfecti is a Certified Organic company specializing in gourmet mushrooms and mushroom-related products. Since 1980, we have offered an ever-expanding line of products for the mushroom enthusiast.
Terry Calhoun's insight:

Paul Stamets

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Terry Calhoun
Scoop.it!

The Necessary Steps for Properly Pruning Pussy Willows

The Necessary Steps for Properly Pruning Pussy Willows | Bratsholme Food Forest Farm | Scoop.it
The idea behind pruning pussy willows is to promote new, unimpeded/unimpeding growth. You want to increase the size of the shrubs laterally.
Terry Calhoun's insight:

Excellent!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Terry Calhoun
Scoop.it!

North American Willow Cut-stem Growers: A Survey of the Business Identities, Production Practices, and Prospective for the Crop

North American Willow Cut-stem Growers: A Survey of the Business Identities, Production Practices, and Prospective for the Crop | Bratsholme Food Forest Farm | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Terry Calhoun
Scoop.it!

Unusual and edible tree and shrub species grown at Gawmless End

Unusual and edible tree and shrub species grown at Gawmless End | Bratsholme Food Forest Farm | Scoop.it
Unusual and edible tree and shrub Species grown at Gawmless End (Gormless End)
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Terry Calhoun
Scoop.it!

The Toxins That Threaten Our Brains

The Toxins That Threaten Our Brains | Bratsholme Food Forest Farm | Scoop.it
Leading scientists recently identified a dozen chemicals as being responsible for widespread behavioral and cognitive problems. But the scope of the chemical dangers in our environment is likely even greater. Why children and the poor are most susceptible to neurotoxic exposure that may be costing the U.S. billions of dollars and immeasurable peace of mind.
more...
No comment yet.