Terminology
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Interview with Miguel Sánchez Ibáñez - TermCoord Terminology Coordination Unit

Interview with Miguel Sánchez Ibáñez - TermCoord Terminology Coordination Unit | Terminology | Scoop.it

Interview with Miguel Sánchez Ibáñez (by Marina Gutiérrez): "Miguel Sánchez Ibáñez is a lecturer and researcher at the Spanish university UCAM (Universidad Católica San Antonio de Murcia). He holds a degree in translation and interpreting from the University of Salamanca (Spain). He also has a PhD in translation and intercultural mediation from the same university".

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During his student time, he decided to make terminology one of the pillars of his career, as it provided him tools and skills about his role as a translator and interpreter.  Now, as a lecturer and researcher at the Spanish university UCAM, Miguel Sánchez Ibáñez is a young terminologist with the challenge of making terminology classes appealing for students and succeeding in the goal of getting translators interested in Terminology. With a focus on the Spanish language’s terminological dependency on English for vocabulary relating to Alzheimer’s disease, this lover of language and words reclaims the creation of a central institution to regulate Spanish terminology and support the work of professionals in this field.

 

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IATE Term of the Week: Wastewater treatment

IATE Term of the Week: Wastewater treatment | Terminology | Scoop.it
The European Environment Agency publishes the annual bathing water quality report and, in this context, wastewater treatment is the IATE Term of this week!
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Are dictionaries relevant for specialists?

Are dictionaries relevant for specialists? | Terminology | Scoop.it
Having worked as a terminologist for some 11 years and witnessing some challenges subject-field specialists have in finding the desired information in a dictionary, it's not surprising that I have decided to write about specialists and their relation to terminography.  I have also studied this topic in my Master's dissertation (2012) which was about the…
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6 Words You Need To Eliminate From Your Professional Vocabulary

6 Words You Need To Eliminate From Your Professional Vocabulary | Terminology | Scoop.it
Everyone wants to be seen as eloquent, intelligent and credible. To ensure you’re being perceived in the way you want, begin eliminating these words from your professional vocabulary.

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9 Beautifully Quirky Foreign Words | Reader's Digest

9 Beautifully Quirky Foreign Words | Reader's Digest | Terminology | Scoop.it
Can you say "the distance a reindeer can travel before needing to rest" in just one word? The Finns do. Here, more magical words that pack volumes of meaning into few letters.
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MEET 10 NEW WORDS OF THE BRITISH DICTIONARY

MEET 10 NEW WORDS OF THE BRITISH DICTIONARY | Terminology | Scoop.it
English native speakers are very inventive and tirelessly create denotations for new social phenomena.
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Soy 'milk'? Even federal agencies can't agree on terminology

Soy 'milk'? Even federal agencies can't agree on terminology | Terminology | Scoop.it
NEW YORK (AP) — Dairy farmers want U.S. regulators to banish the term “soy milk,” but documents show even government agencies haven’t always agreed on what to call such drinks.

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User-centred Views on Terminology Extraction Tools: Usage Scenarios and Integration into MT and CAT Tools

User-centred Views on Terminology Extraction Tools: Usage Scenarios and Integration into MT and CAT Tools | Terminology | Scoop.it
Translation Careers and Technologies : Convergence Points for the Future...

Abstract

This paper presents usage scenarios of the platform being developed within the TTC project (Terminology Extraction, Translation Tools and Comparable Corpora) along with the first feedback from potential users.The TTC project aims at leveraging translation tools, computer-assisted translation tools, and terminology management tools by automatically generating bilingual terminologies from comparable corpora in several languages of the European Union (English, French, German, Latvian and Spanish), as well as in Chinese and Russian. The TTC platform includes a web crawler and a corpora management tool, as well as tools for monolingual term extraction and bilingual terminology alignment, online terminology management, and terminology export into CAT tools and MT systems.
Overall, the paper focuses on the language activities to be carried out with the TTC tools, issues with respect to the availability of required language resources and linguistic knowledge, and different user profiles and needs. Regarding potential user needs, we discuss the results of an online questionnaire-based survey on terminology and corpora issues conducted in the translation and localization industry to reveal user needs. Furthermore, we present the envisaged usage scenarios as well as first feedback from potential users. The expected TTC input and outputs are also outlined. Finally, as it seems clear that the amount of available data and resources will not be the same for all languages, we discuss technical solutions to achieve language coverage: the TTC tools will offer different approaches depending on the amount and type of linguistic knowledge available.


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From Translator to Terminologist: Terminology as a Professional Career - In My Own Terms

From Translator to Terminologist: Terminology as a Professional Career - In My Own Terms | Terminology | Scoop.it
From Translator to Terminologist: Terminology as a Professional CareerThere are those translators who manage terminology and also those who become full-time terminologists. More and more translators and other professionals are becoming terminologists or have dived headfirst into terminology research and work.Last week, Proz.com held its Annual Virtual Conference 2015 “Managing glossaries and terminology” in the context of the International Translation Day, with the participation of renowned guests panelists who have been in the translation business for a long time and who have eventually become involved in terminology work and research, some of them even working as full-time terminologists. Jeff Allen was the Moderator; and guest panelists were Barbara Inge Karsch, Michael Beijer, Jim Wardell, and Mirko Plitt. (Click on the link at the end of this post to read their full bios).Terminologist Barbara Inge Karsch (whom I interviewed for this blog last year), said she started out as a translator and later became a terminologist for big companies such as Microsoft. Then she started her own terminology consultancy services company. She loves terminology because, in her words, she can “help people solve problems” and she´s an “advocate for the difficult task that freelance translators have to accomplish.”Jim Wardell, a German-to-English translator for almost 40 years, indicated that the longer he is in the translation business, the more he realizes that “Terminology is excruciatingly important, getting it right, being fanatical about Terminology, because this is what sets you, as a translator, apart from all the others who don’t do their homework, and that’s what makes your translations shine. My passion is to make sure that I do my homework and to sermonize to others to be good and do it.” Some translators don´t spend enough time doing their homework, that is, searching for the right terminology, and rush through their translation work just to have it done on time. He gave special advice to the newbie translators in the sense that they should start early doing their terminology homework by recording every term in their termbase so that these don´t come back to them to haunt them.Mirko Plitt, a German linguist, has worked as a translation reviser and has been involved in localization for a long time. To him, “Terminology was not a question of technology but about how people work together. What I find interesting about Terminology is not only a very genuine, integral, and essential aspect of what translation is about but an important tool to bring together the different stakeholders into the translation process, to make the people understand what something is about and how to say it in a different language. It´s non-trivial. It´s a combat that is never won; you have to keep fighting it. It´s pretty representative of what translation is about. It´s complex and you can be passionate about it.”Michael Beijer, a full-time professional translator and terminologist has been a translator for nearly 20 years and he soon realized that he had an obsession to collect dictionaries and glossaries, and it made him mad to see source texts that were “messy” (which was about 80% of the time) in which authors would use six different terms for the same thing (misspelled, hyphenated, nonhyphenated) and that made him think that he had to do something about it, as it was driving him crazy. “Translation and Terminology are inextricably intertwined”, he said. “Translating is the easy part as it comes naturally to you, but it is the terminology that trips you off. Sixty percent of my work is translation and the rest is terminology work.” He is a “terminology private investigator”, as Jeff Allen put it.Jeff Allen is known for his work in controlled language writing for translation, Machine Translation dictionary building and post-editing, translation memory, among others. As of late, he has been getting more and more involved in terminology and he underlined the increased interest in Terminology among translators by pointing out that in a recent event he attended, the Q&A session at the end included mostly questions on terminology.Jeff Allen mentioned at the beginning that it seemed that people were too busy to sign up for the conference. Indeed, people are busy at this time of year, but (in my opinion) it´s also partly because translators, in general, don´t seem to be paying enough attention to the potential of terminology to boost their professional careers. Panelists agreed that we need to raise awareness on Terminology. Some translators rush to have their translations ready but they need to educate the client on the importance of doing a thorough terminology work from the beginning.As it was often said during the virtual conference, those of us who are involved in terminology have found a new religion and have become Terminology fanatics. In my effort to raise awareness about the importance of terminology, I invite you to watch the recording of this interesting and valuable conference to learn about their experience in becoming translators-terminologists. Click here to read their bios and watch the video.Also, check out my Training section if you want to get serious about Terminology and read tomorrow my post called “The Science of Terminology”, that complements this post.
Via Charles Tiayon
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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, October 5, 2015 12:31 AM
From Translator to Terminologist: Terminology as a Professional CareerThere are those translators who manage terminology and also those who become full-time terminologists. More and more translators and other professionals are becoming terminologists or have dived headfirst into terminology research and work.Last week, Proz.com held its Annual Virtual Conference 2015 “Managing glossaries and terminology” in the context of the International Translation Day, with the participation of renowned guests panelists who have been in the translation business for a long time and who have eventually become involved in terminology work and research, some of them even working as full-time terminologists. Jeff Allen was the Moderator; and guest panelists were Barbara Inge Karsch, Michael Beijer, Jim Wardell, and Mirko Plitt. (Click on the link at the end of this post to read their full bios).Terminologist Barbara Inge Karsch (whom I interviewed for this blog last year), said she started out as a translator and later became a terminologist for big companies such as Microsoft. Then she started her own terminology consultancy services company. She loves terminology because, in her words, she can “help people solve problems” and she´s an “advocate for the difficult task that freelance translators have to accomplish.”Jim Wardell, a German-to-English translator for almost 40 years, indicated that the longer he is in the translation business, the more he realizes that “Terminology is excruciatingly important, getting it right, being fanatical about Terminology, because this is what sets you, as a translator, apart from all the others who don’t do their homework, and that’s what makes your translations shine. My passion is to make sure that I do my homework and to sermonize to others to be good and do it.” Some translators don´t spend enough time doing their homework, that is, searching for the right terminology, and rush through their translation work just to have it done on time. He gave special advice to the newbie translators in the sense that they should start early doing their terminology homework by recording every term in their termbase so that these don´t come back to them to haunt them.Mirko Plitt, a German linguist, has worked as a translation reviser and has been involved in localization for a long time. To him, “Terminology was not a question of technology but about how people work together. What I find interesting about Terminology is not only a very genuine, integral, and essential aspect of what translation is about but an important tool to bring together the different stakeholders into the translation process, to make the people understand what something is about and how to say it in a different language. It´s non-trivial. It´s a combat that is never won; you have to keep fighting it. It´s pretty representative of what translation is about. It´s complex and you can be passionate about it.”Michael Beijer, a full-time professional translator and terminologist has been a translator for nearly 20 years and he soon realized that he had an obsession to collect dictionaries and glossaries, and it made him mad to see source texts that were “messy” (which was about 80% of the time) in which authors would use six different terms for the same thing (misspelled, hyphenated, nonhyphenated) and that made him think that he had to do something about it, as it was driving him crazy. “Translation and Terminology are inextricably intertwined”, he said. “Translating is the easy part as it comes naturally to you, but it is the terminology that trips you off. Sixty percent of my work is translation and the rest is terminology work.” He is a “terminology private investigator”, as Jeff Allen put it.Jeff Allen is known for his work in controlled language writing for translation, Machine Translation dictionary building and post-editing, translation memory, among others. As of late, he has been getting more and more involved in terminology and he underlined the increased interest in Terminology among translators by pointing out that in a recent event he attended, the Q&A session at the end included mostly questions on terminology.Jeff Allen mentioned at the beginning that it seemed that people were too busy to sign up for the conference. Indeed, people are busy at this time of year, but (in my opinion) it´s also partly because translators, in general, don´t seem to be paying enough attention to the potential of terminology to boost their professional careers. Panelists agreed that we need to raise awareness on Terminology. Some translators rush to have their translations ready but they need to educate the client on the importance of doing a thorough terminology work from the beginning.As it was often said during the virtual conference, those of us who are involved in terminology have found a new religion and have become Terminology fanatics. In my effort to raise awareness about the importance of terminology, I invite you to watch the recording of this interesting and valuable conference to learn about their experience in becoming translators-terminologists. Click here to read their bios and watch the video.Also, check out my Training section if you want to get serious about Terminology and read tomorrow my post called “The Science of Terminology”, that complements this post.
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Neologism: Ad Tædium

Neologism: Ad Tædium | Terminology | Scoop.it

Slouched in your chair, head resting between your arms, thoughts in another place, you have been listening to your professor lecturing ad tædium, to the point that you have to evade the dryness through your imaginative daydreaming, so that now you are not even processing a word he says. The phrase ad tædium is Latin for "toward or until…

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IATE Term of the Week: forest ratio

IATE Term of the Week: forest ratio | Terminology | Scoop.it

A new proposal states that EU countries have to compensate for emissions caused by deforestation. Thus, forest ratio is the new IATE Term of the Week.

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Europass: Glossary

Europass: Glossary | Terminology | Scoop.it

"This glossary defines a selection of 100 terms used in the field of education and training policy in Europe. It is intended for researchers and practitioners and more generally for all those involved in education and training policy..."

©


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Have you ever thought of using Greek and Latin for Marketing?

Have you ever thought of using Greek and Latin for Marketing? | Terminology | Scoop.it
Terminology means dealing with neology and its etymology every day. New products often use words whose roots come from Ancient Greek or Latin.
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Integrating IATE in software solutions

Integrating IATE in software solutions | Terminology | Scoop.it
The terminology of the EU database IATE is free and available for extraction in TBX format, and public institutions and companies are benefiting from it.
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Some Important Reasons for Studying Terminology

Some Important Reasons for Studying Terminology | Terminology | Scoop.it
       Language is the system of using words to communicate with other people. Specialized language has the same function but in a different level. Learning and dominating vocabulary of a domain would give us the opportunity to comprehend specific topics and communicate about them. For instance, for making conversations about politics we need…

Via Maria Pia Montoro
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Eight words from Shakespeare that the business world still uses today

Eight words from Shakespeare that the business world still uses today | Terminology | Scoop.it

"Four hundred years after the Bard's death, we're still using the same words he gave us to get stuff done and make money ..."


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28 Artificial Intelligence Terms You Need to Know

Learn some of the biggest terms you need to know when it comes to AI, from algorithms to clustering to natural language processing and everything in between.


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What's the Most Complicated Word in English?

What's the Most Complicated Word in English? | Terminology | Scoop.it
According to the editors of the Oxford English Dictionary, the most complicated word in the English language is something we're all familiar with. 

 
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How Do Words Get Added to the Dictionary?

How Do Words Get Added to the Dictionary? | Terminology | Scoop.it
Four times a year, lexicographers update and add words to the OED. Katherine Connor Martin helps decide what makes the cut.
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20 Essential Technology Terms for Teachers

20 Essential Technology Terms for Teachers | Terminology | Scoop.it
Let's lay out some of the more confusing technology terms that educators will encounter on a regular basis and see just what is behind each one.

Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, March 5, 2013 7:33 PM

There are so many terms used in technology that it is sometimes hard to recall what each of them mean...so here is a post that will help you out. Below are three of the twenty listed. Do you know what each of them means?

* Adaptive Learning

* GAFE

* LMS

Andrea Jean's curator insight, March 5, 2013 8:38 PM

Very helpful tool to keep teachers up to date on some technicial words that may come up with using technology in the classroom.

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Ten Things You Should Know about Automatic Terminology Extraction (Part One) « T for Translation – Life, the Times, and Localization at CSOFT International

Ten Things You Should Know about Automatic Terminology Extraction (Part One) « T for Translation – Life, the Times, and Localization at CSOFT International | Terminology | Scoop.it

t is probably safe to say that many, if not most, commercial translation and localization projects today are carried out without a comprehensive, project-specific, up-to-date glossary in place. I suspect that one of the primary reasons for this inefficient state of affairs is the fact that many participants involved in these projects are not familiar with the tools and processes that enable linguists to create monolingual and multilingual glossaries quickly and efficiently. Below are five valuable insights for linguists who wish to give automatic terminology extraction a/nother try.

1. The two biggest issues with terminology extraction tools: Noise and silence

Many commercial terminology extraction tools, including SDL MultiTerm Extract, use a language-independent approach to terminology extraction, which has the benefit of giving linguists a single tool for extracting terminology in many different languages. The drawback of this approach is that the percentage of ‘noise,’ i.e. invalid term candidates, and ‘silence,’ i.e. missing legitimate term candidates, is typically higher than in linguistic extraction tools that use language-specific term formation patterns. As a result, many linguists who use these popular extraction products are disappointed by the amount of (clean-up) work that some of these fairly expensive products can require.


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TermNet - TaaS: Terminology as a Service - Online Survey on Terminology Research and Management Practices

TermNet - TaaS: Terminology as a Service - Online Survey on Terminology Research and Management Practices | Terminology | Scoop.it
TermNet would like to invite you to participate in an online survey about terminology research and management practices in relation to the project “TaaS: Terminology as a Service” which establishes a cloud-based platform for acquiring, cleaning up, sharing and reusing multilingual terminology for human and machines as users.

In order to meet exactly the requirements of you as the potential future beneficiaries of TaaS services, the TaaS consortium needs your input which will be used to define the specification of said services. Please dedicate 10 minutes to answer this online questionnaire until 31. July 2012 to support this initiative.

The survey is anonymous (you will be just offered to give your e-mail address to be used for sending feedback about the results of the survey).

Link to the survey: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/GPNRXGK

ABOUT THE TAAS PROJECT

TaaS addresses the following crucial issues:

the need for instant access to the most up-to-date terms;
user participation in the acquisition and sharing of multilingual terminological data;
efficient solutions for terminology resources reuse.

The objective of TaaS is to align the speed of terminology resource acquisition with the speed at which content is created by mining new terms directly from the web by

simplifying the process for language workers to prepare, store and share task-specific multilingual term glossaries;
providing instant access to term equivalents and translation candidates for professional translators through CAT tools;
adapting statistical machine translation systems via dynamic integration with TaaS-provided terminology data.
TaaS will provide the following basic terminology services:

Automatic extraction of monolingual term candidates from users’ documents
Automatic recognition of translation equivalents in existing terminology resources
Automatic acquisition of translation equivalents from web data
Facilities for cleaning up of acquired terminology
Facilities for terminology sharing and (re)using in users’ applications

....

http://www.termnet.org/english/about_us/news/?we_objectID=958


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Terminology resources for external translators

Terminology resources for external translators | Terminology | Scoop.it

Terminology resources for external translators

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(EN) - Glossary of Art Terms | MoMA

(EN) - Glossary of Art Terms | MoMA | Terminology | Scoop.it

"MoMA | Glossary of Art Terms (MOMa Glossary of Art Terms / Glosario de Arte con enlaces a obras ilustrando las definiciones)."


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Why is wine so confusing? Wine terminology: explained.

Why is wine so confusing? Wine terminology: explained. | Terminology | Scoop.it
These terms have been coined for a reason: they accurately describe characteristics of wine. But sometimes they can be ridiculously confusing. 

Via Michael Fredericks
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