Tennis in 2012
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College: 10 Step Guides - How to Choose the Right College

College: 10 Step Guides - How to Choose the Right College | Tennis in 2012 | Scoop.it

10 Step Guide for helping students and parents get into and pay for college.

Imagine colleges are Neapolitan ice cream.

you need to divide your college choices into three categories. Your chocolate colleges are your top-choice schools but also those that are most difficult to get into. Your vanilla colleges are schools that you have a reasonable chance of getting into and ones you would be happy to attend. Your strawberry colleges are your "safety colleges"—those schools that you will definitely get into.

Seek out personal recommendations.

The best way to get started finding colleges is to speak to those around you. Talk to your counselors, teachers, family friends and even (get ready for it) your parents. Often these people will be full of friendly advice and what's nice is that since they know you, they may have specific reasons for recommending a certain college. Take note of their recommendations but don't assume that they will give you the answers. Remember, you are just getting started. Asking the people you know for recommendations is a good way to generate a preliminary list of schools. As you research these schools, you'll begin to discover what is important to you. It may turn out that these initial recommendations were spot on or totally off.

Focus on your academic goals.

When you think about schools, you need to consider what you really want in an education. Do you want to be trained for a specific line of work or do you want a more general liberal arts education? A pre-professional education prepares you for a specific job and includes areas such as engineering and pre-med. Some schools like M.I.T. have very strong programs for those interested in the sciences but might not be right for someone interested in literature. A liberal arts education, on the other hand, aims to equip you with general knowledge and reasoning skills suitable for many jobs.

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5 Ways to Beat a Pusher

5 Ways to Beat a Pusher | Tennis in 2012 | Scoop.it

Have trouble with tennis players who always lob and don't put pace on the ball? Find out five strategies to change the game in your favor.

1. Don't Play Their Style of Game. Don't allow them to dictate the pace of play and do not start pushing back your shots if it's not your typical game plan.

2. Get to the Net: "Pushers" usually don't have great passing shots so you should be able to get just about anything they try to pass you with. It's also not their typical style to try to hit hard to pass someone, so it may force the error.

I like to serve and volley when playing these types of players. They usually do not lob back the serve, and even if they do I am not having to run backwards to get the lob since I am not that close to the net yet.

3. Be Patient: You have to remember that even though they hit almost every ball back, their shots will usually not hurt you. Be patient and wait for the right ball to step in and hit a winner or an approach shot.

4. Shot Selection: If you chose your shot selection correctly and execute properly, taking advantage of the previous strategies will be much easier. The first piece of this puzzle is finding out what your opponent is uncomfortable playing.

5. Stay patient, focused and do not get angry.The "pusher" looks very beatable from far away, but once you get into the match they can cause many people problems. Keep the points smart because they will most likely not be short points.

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Bryant: The year the Big 3 became the Fantastic 4

The 2012 Grand Slam season will be remembered by many things, but the most significant of them is that it was the year the men's Big 3 evolved into the Fantastic 4, Howard Bryant writes.

Although Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal both are still the defining players of their time and both won a major title this year, their stranglehold on tennis -- already eased due to the presence of Novak Djokovic -- is loosening further, both incrementally and dramatically. The tennis world without Nadal is certainly less powerful, but Murray has entered the private room as a full member.

 There were great and beautiful moments during the Grand Slam season: Djokovic's heart and will, Ferrer's determination. The classic quarterfinal between Ferrer and Tipsarevic at the U.S. Open was -- until the final -- the best match of the tournament. Nadal won his seventh French Open, despite the cost, and of course, Federer's charge back to No. 1 and his elegant capture of major No. 17.

The year, though, belongs to Murray, for in the brutal final it was clear through the wind gusts that Murray was bridging the gulf between knowing and believing. He knew he belonged in the category but couldn't completely believe because he hadn't won.

His moment came in the fifth set, when he broke Djokovic thrillingly for the second time for the knockout, the classic sounds of Djokovic racing, flailing and screeching along the baseline proof that this time there would be no legendary comeback from two sets down, no primal, defiant howls, and no miraculous return from the brink. The inexhaustible Djokovic was spent. The tree fell. Without asterisks, the Big Three had become a Fantastic Four.

 http://espn.go.com/video/clip?id=espn:8364709

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Are two handles better than one? | The Tennis Space

Are two handles better than one? | The Tennis Space | Tennis in 2012 | Scoop.it

You have two hands, so why not use them?

Brian Battistone is a 33-year-old American who has been ranked inside the world’s top 100 in doubles. He is better known, however, for his use of an innovative two-handled racket, which allows him, if he chooses, to hit a forehand on both sides. Brian played in the mixed doubles at the US Open last month and a new version of the racket, called The Freestyle, has just come on the market.The Tennis Space caught up with him in New York to get the science behind it and find out everything you could want to know about it.

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Sporting Greats: Rafael Nadal

This programme Sporting Greats: Rafael Nadal was broadcast by SkySports2.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EOE5ofdtVOU

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Murray outslugs Djokovic for first Grand Slam singles title

Murray outslugs Djokovic for first Grand Slam singles title | Tennis in 2012 | Scoop.it

Andy Murray outlasted defending US Open champion Novak Djokovic in five sets to win the 2012 US Open and his first career Grand Slam singles title.

Murray fought, rallied and persevered to a 7-6 (10), 7-5, 2-6, 3-6, 6-2 win over defending US Open champion Novak Djokovic for his first career Grand Slam singles title at the 2012 US Open. With the victory, he became the first British man to win a major title since Fred Perry won the U.S. Championships in 1936.

It was Murray’s first major title in his fifth Grand Slam singles final, just like his new coach, eight-time Grand Slam champion Ivan Lendl, who also won his first title in his fifth final. Murray is now one of just two men (the other del Potro) not named Djokovic, Federer or Rafael Nadal to win a Grand Slam since Wimbledon in 2005, helping solidify his status as one of the ‘Big Four’ currently on the ATP Tour.

Murray seemed to be on his way to a straight-sets victory after winning an 87-minute first set and then rallying from losing a two-break lead in the second. But Djokovic stepped up to the championship level that has won him five Grand Slam singles titles, playing points with confidence, improving his serve and putting pressure on the Scot in the third and fourth sets. But Murray did not let himself break down, even if he said at the end he was not sure how.

“You're not sad; you're incredibly happy,” he said of being in the winning position this time. “You're in a little bit of disbelief because when I have been in that position many times before and not won, you do think, ‘Is it ever going to happen?’ Then when it finally does, you just, you're obviously very, very excited.”

Winning the Olympic gold medal was the highlight of Murray’s career a few weeks ago, but after this fortnight in Flushing Meadows, he has some new career-best memories, which he hopes are just the start of many more to come.

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