Ten skills that employers want
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Bob Kulhan: Is Improvisation the most important business skill? - intrepid.MEDIA

Bob Kulhan: Is Improvisation the most important business skill? - intrepid.MEDIA | Ten skills that employers want | Scoop.it
Author and improv actor Bob Kulhan joins us to discuss the importance of improv skills in business, from crisis management to creativity and innovation.
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Your Brain on Reading (Why Your Brain Needs You to Read Every Day)

The reading brain can be likened to the real-time collaborative effort of a symphony orchestra, with various parts of the brain working together, like sections of instruments, to maximize our ability to decode the written text in front of us.

Via Nik Peachey
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Nik Peachey's curator insight, May 26, 1:34 AM

Interesting article with some good links to research.

faith ward's curator insight, May 26, 10:13 AM
Great links to current reading research.
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How To Communicate With People Who Disagree With You

How To Communicate With People Who Disagree With You | Ten skills that employers want | Scoop.it

We’ve all been there: those times you need to argue your point of view to someone who you know disagrees with you. You immediately go to your keyboard and start to type out that 280-character tweet, the Facebook reply, or a paragraphs-long email. Surely the reason, logic, and sheer power of your written words will convince whoever it is who disagrees with you to see your point of view? But new research suggests these written arguments may not be the best approach.


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, May 10, 1:43 AM

Research suggests oral, not written, communication works best.

Yanglish's curator insight, May 14, 10:27 AM
...written arguments may not be the best approach.
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The Transferable Skills of Blog Writing

The Transferable Skills of Blog Writing | Ten skills that employers want | Scoop.it
There’s a reason it seems like everyone you know has taken up blogging.It’s an effective way to communicate something you care about, it’s a fun way to build community and connect with people who share your perspectives or interests, and it can be an effective business move, whether you use it as...
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The Top Digital Skills That Boost Marketing Careers

The Top Digital Skills That Boost Marketing Careers | Ten skills that employers want | Scoop.it
As marketing roles evolve into online-savvy positions focused on customer segmentation & digital outreach, these digital skills are crucial for marketers.
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What Skills Make for Good Library Programming?

What Skills Make for Good Library Programming? | Ten skills that employers want | Scoop.it
“What skills or abilities do you think are necessary to successfully run public programs at libraries?” More than 1,200 library professionals from all around the country and from all types of libraries weighed in on this question last fall as part of the NILPPA research. As we read their responses, we found nine categories of skills that came up time and again. Top Nine Skills for Programming To do public programs, library workers need communication skills, including customer service, networking, public speaking, facilitation, and “people skills.” Running programs requires talking to all kinds of people in all kinds of contexts. Staff working in public programs also need organizational skills. We included two frequent keywords, “project management” and “time management,” in this category. Perhaps obviously, event planning skills came up time and again. To run programs at libraries, it’s important to have knowledge of the community. That means everything from listening skills and open-mindedness to intercultural and diversity skills. It also includes group-specific competencies like second language skills or knowledge of child development. There’s no point in running a program if nobody comes. Outreach and marketing also made the list. It’s also important to be creative. Unexpected challenges come up with programs all the time, and quite a few people mentioned “flexibility” and “problem-solving” as essential. This job function also requires financial skills: budgeting, grants, and fundraising, depending on how the library functions. Many of the library staffers who answered the survey emphasized evaluation skills. To assess the value of programs, library programming staff need to understand statistics, benchmarking, and how to assess a community’s needs and resources. Finally, we received many responses pinpointing content knowledge. For example, it’s nearly impossible to run a coding class if you don’t know how to use a computer. A quantitative analysis generally corroborated the popularity of these categories among the responses. Library Degree Programs We also asked what knowledge or skill areas these people believed should be part of library degree programs. While the skills fit into the same categories, people talked about them in different ways. In particular, they were more likely to emphasize teachable skills rather than personality traits. For example, many respondents said that “people skills” were necessary for running public programs — but they were more likely to say that “customer service” should be taught as part of the degree. We’ll see why in our next blog post, when we look at how library staffers learned to run programs. What Do You Think? We would love to add your voice to our research. Do you think any of these skills aren’t as important? Is there something we haven’t mentioned that you use a lot? Do the skills you need change according to library type? Comment below or email ALA’s Public Programs Office at publicprograms@ala.org to share your thoughts.
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These Are The Top 5 Skills For Tech Jobs Right Now

These Are The Top 5 Skills For Tech Jobs Right Now | Ten skills that employers want | Scoop.it
If you're looking to break into the tech industry, these are the top five job skills that recruiters and companies are looking for in employees.
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Cengage Introduces New Career Search Tool to Help Close the Skills Gap

Cengage Introduces New Career Search Tool to Help Close the Skills Gap | Ten skills that employers want | Scoop.it
Jonathan Lau, SVP for Skills at Cengage, discusses Skill Map, a new online tool to help learners explore in-demand skills and jobs and get started on the right “Career Journey.
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Creative Thinking Definition, Skills, and Examples

Creative Thinking Definition, Skills, and Examples | Ten skills that employers want | Scoop.it
Creative thinking definition, including its attributes, why employers value creative thinkers, and examples of creative thinking workplace skills.
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Eight Essential Skills To Look For When Growing Your Tech Team

Eight Essential Skills To Look For When Growing Your Tech Team | Ten skills that employers want | Scoop.it
Adding to your tech team can feel like an impossible task. You are inundated with candidates that potentially may be a good fit, yet you are unsure of whom to hire. You want an IT candidate that is not only professional in their demeanor but highly skilled and experienced. Knowing what traits can make for a solid tech team hire can ensure you pick the right candidate for the job without regret. Soft skills are crucial for day-to-day operations, while at the same time you need someone who has a reasonable chance of performing the tasks you need to be done. This means it is essential to hire a professional who can offer the optimal combination of soft and hard skills that will truly benefit your business when the candidate comes aboard. To help you with your hiring decision, eight members of Forbes Technology Council share one trait they look for in a key hire for tech teams, something that helps them determine who gets the offer. Here is what they had to say:  1. Ability To Communicate Technology Efficiently When hiring for a tech team, I look for someone who is able to communicate technology to different audiences. Technical knowledge is important, but one must be able to share it in order for the rest of the team to leverage and build on that knowledge. I often ask how they would explain a technical concept to a six year old. - Hubert Yoshida, Hitachi Vantara 2. The Right Attitude There is a base level of skill I am interested in when I look for key hires, but provided they possess that base skill level, I pick key hires on attitude over skill. Skill can be taught, but attitude can't. I also check to see if their values are in line with my personal values to ensure a fit. I can deal with a difference in opinion and approach, but it is hard to fix a misalignment in core values. - Kamal Sadarangani, DeWired Now LLC Forbes Technology Council is an invitation-only community for world-class CIOs, CTOs and technology executives. Do I qualify? 3. Good Collaboration Skills A tech team not only needs to be able to solve technical issues but also to be able to work well with others. We look for effective communicators in our tech hires. Individuals who are effective at explaining technical issues to stakeholders help our business and our clients make informed decisions to help our companies. - Micheal Goodwin, Server@Work, LLC
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Seven New Strategies For Onboarding Modern Employees

Members of Forbes Coaches Council discuss the newest trends in employee onboarding.
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Creative Thinking Definition, Skills, and Examples

Creative Thinking Definition, Skills, and Examples | Ten skills that employers want | Scoop.it
Creative thinking definition, including its attributes, why employers value creative thinkers, and examples of creative thinking workplace skills.
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Is The Ideal Entrepreneur Right Brain Or Left Brain?

Is The Ideal Entrepreneur Right Brain Or Left Brain? | Ten skills that employers want | Scoop.it
If you’re a creative who’s struggling to get your business to take off, let me assure you it’s got nothing to do with your talent and has everything to do with a missing piece of the puzzle that you might not even know is missing But I have a fix for you.
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Want more soft skills in IT? Tweak your interview process | The Enterprisers Project

Want more soft skills in IT? Tweak your interview process | The Enterprisers Project | Ten skills that employers want | Scoop.it
What are the essential soft skills, and how do you find them in interviewees? Try these 3 approaches.
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How To Ask For A Referral Without Sounding Entitled Or Desperate

How To Ask For A Referral Without Sounding Entitled Or Desperate | Ten skills that employers want | Scoop.it

If you’re close to somebody connected to the company–be it a friend, family member, or former colleague–you’re in luck. Assuming you have a good relationship, they will probably be happy to help you out.

 

“Be honest with them. Tell them what it is you’re ultimately looking for, and give them an idea of how they can help you,” recommends career coach Carlota Zimmerman.

 

Keep in mind, though, that a request for a referral–even when asking a close friend–is not a guarantee that you’ll receive one. If somebody can’t vouch for your work quality, they may not be comfortable putting themselves on the line for you. Because of this, it’s polite to give somebody an out, says Roy Cohen, career coach and author of The Wall Street Professional’s Survival Guide.


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, May 10, 1:49 AM

Referrals are a great way to get an “in” at a company. But you should always be tactful about asking for it.

HOME GIRAFFE's curator insight, May 21, 10:05 PM

Check out this great article I found on Scoopit.

As a business owner myself I found it quite insightful.

 

We have many clients, and they are all happy, and we realise that word of mouth is the best way to grow. But asking for referrals is never easy.

 

Thanks for writing this article and giving us some tips to help us out.

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The man likely to be the next CEO of Goldman Sachs says the perfect résumé won't get you the job — here's what will

The man likely to be the next CEO of Goldman Sachs says the perfect résumé won't get you the job — here's what will | Ten skills that employers want | Scoop.it
Crains New York Harvey Schwartz, co-president and co-chief operating officer of Goldman Sachs, is retiring next month, leaving fellow co-president and co-COO as the sole heir apparent to CEO Lloyd Blankfein.  Here's Solomon's best career advice, which he gave during an episode of the firm's podcast.  It just became a lot clearer who will replace Goldman Sachs chief executive Lloyd Blankfein when he formally retires.  The bank announced Monday Harvey Schwartz, one of the two men considered as a potential successor to the billionaire bank, is retiring next month, leaving David Solomon as the sole candidate to replace Blankfein when he steps down.  Solomon, who was appointed to his current position as co-chief operating officer and co-president in 2017, has been with Goldman since 1999. As such, he's had a few resumes come across his desk. But during an interview on the firm's podcast, "Exchanges at Goldman Sachs," Solomon offered his best career advice, saying the resume is not the be-all and end-all.  "I see some incredible resumes that over the years come across my desk," Solomon said. "But when you start to sit down and talk with them, they can't communicate or articulate in a way that backs up just the raw academic performance." People with poor communication skills, he says, are not doomed for failure but they could face more barriers. "Take public speaking," Solomon said. "Take some writing classes. Think about how you can develop communication skills, because it will help you in anything you do." Take some accounting Solomon also shared the advice his father gave him when he was younger, which he also passed on to his daughters: Take some accounting.  "Everyone should take a semester of account," Solomon said. "Just understanding basic accounting really helps you understand how a lot of the world works from an economic perspective." Accounting, according to Solomon, is useful because it helps people understand how to run everything from a home to a giant company. That said, Solomon said it's important for students to follow their heart when it comes to the subject they get their full degree in. "And when you dig into things that you have some passion about or some interest in, you go a little deeper, you work a bit harder," he said.  As for Solomon, he had a less-than-typical career path - he skipped the Ivy League and studied political science at Hamilton College in upstate New York.  EXCLUSIVE FREE REPORT: Top trends from this year's Money20/20 by the BI Intelligence Research Team. Get the Report Now »
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Reverse Mentoring - Career Development Tools From MindTools.com

Reverse Mentoring - Career Development Tools From MindTools.com | Ten skills that employers want | Scoop.it
© iStockphoto zagal Reverse mentoring isn’t just a one-way street. Learning is ever in the freshness of its youth, even for the old.– Aeschylus, Greek Playwright People often think that the longer you work for an organization, the more you know and the less you need to learn. However, younger members of staff who are just entering the workplace often have new skills and expertise, and they can provide fresh perspectives and ways of working that can benefit their more established colleagues. Companies are now starting to realize that top-down learning is not always appropriate, particularly where social media and use of technology are involved, and "reverse mentoring" programs are emerging as a result. These give junior team members the opportunity to share up-to-date skills and knowledge with more senior colleagues. We'll look at reverse mentoring in this article, and we'll discuss how you can use it to build your skills and bridge generational gaps. What Is Reverse Mentoring? In reverse mentoring, a junior team member enters into a "professional friendship" with someone more senior, and they exchange skills, knowledge and understanding. For example, a younger person might be more comfortable with tools such as Pinterest®, WhatsApp® and Hootsuite®, so encouraging a pairing with an older colleague who has less experience of using these technologies can improve that person's ability to connect with potential clients or customers. The former CEO of General Electric®, Jack Welch, is credited with inventing the concept of reverse mentoring. He recognized his lack of technology skills in the late 1990s, and believed that the youngest people joining the company were far more knowledgeable about new technologies than their managers. So, he asked 500 of his top executives to seek out mentors from among these new joiners. Usually, a mentor is expected to be more senior and more experienced than his or her mentee. However, reverse mentoring recognizes that there are skills gaps on both sides, and that each person can address their weaknesses with the help of the other's strengths. For example, a younger team member can pass new skills and ideas up the corporate ladder, and someone older can become a role model or a career coach. Why Form a Reverse Mentoring Relationship? Reverse mentoring can play an important role in bridging the gap between the generations currently in the workforce: baby boomers (born between 1946 and 1964), Generation X (born between 1965 and 1976), and Generation Y  , also called millennials (born between 1977 and 1998). These groups have experienced vastly different social and cultural situations, which has resulted in varied work ethics, mindsets and attitudes. This has led to a number of prejudices and stereotypes forming that can be difficult to overcome. For instance, some people view millennials as spoiled, unmotivated and self-centered, while some millennials view older generations as inefficient and resistant to change. Executives and other leaders need to learn how to cross the generational divide  and communicate with, motivate and engage younger team members. Reverse mentoring can help to challenge these stereotypes, and benefit your team members and the organization as a whole. Note: It's important to remember that not everyone from a specific generation will have had the same experiences or share the same behavioral traits. Treat each member of your team as an individual, and use your best judgment when setting up a reverse mentoring relationship. Drawbacks of Reverse Mentoring You may experience several potential drawbacks when you engage in a reverse mentoring partnership. First, more senior team members may not believe that their younger mentors have valuable knowledge to share, and they may not be open to receiving feedback from people with less experience. Conversely, younger team members need to feel confident enough to share their opinions, and they may be less willing to participate if they are afraid of giving feedback to older colleagues. You may also find that people are unwilling to dedicate time in their already busy schedules to mentor a person they don't like or respect. Finally, your role may not need much knowledge of new technology or Generation Y trends – in these situations, reverse mentoring partnerships may only be "nice to have," not "highly desirable." Get the Free Newsletter Learn new career skills every week, and get our Personal Development Plan Workbook FREE when you subscribe. Privacy Policy How to Create a Successful Reverse Mentoring Partnership Follow these five steps to set up an effective reverse mentoring relationship with a more junior team member. 1. Identify Good Potential Partners An effective mentoring relationship needs good chemistry between both participants, so don't choose someone "just because they're young." Instead, your ideal partner should have skills or knowledge that you need and be willing to build a relationship with you. You may want to conduct a Personal SWOT Analysis  to identify strengths and weaknesses that you can address. You can also develop a relationship with someone externally who has different life and work experiences. Be careful not to share sensitive information about your organization if you do this, and get appropriate permission first. Tip 1: Read our article on Professional Networking  and our Bite-Sized Training session on Networking Skills to learn how to make contacts outside your existing group. Tip 2: Managers are busy people, and are unlikely to find the time for something unless they like the people they're working with. Likewise, more junior employees need to be able to like and respect the people they are paired with. HR departments should try to avoid forcing mentoring relationships on people who, fundamentally, have no interest in engaging with them, or who don't respect the person they're being paired with. 2. Set Clear Goals and Expectations You should discuss your expectations for the relationship with your mentoring partner upfront. Make sure that you're both committed, and that your goals are aligned. What do you want to get out of the relationship? What specific skills do you want to learn? What knowledge, skills and experience can you provide? How and where will you meet? 3. Work on Your Communication Skills It can be challenging to communicate with someone from a different generation. For example, younger people may feel more comfortable engaging with others by email or instant messaging  , while their older colleagues may prefer to speak on the telephone or meet in person. So, make sure that you're sensitive to the other person's communication preferences and needs. Tip: Take our "How Good Are Your Communication Skills?"  quiz to improve your skills in this area. 4. Be Tactful, Patient and Open-Minded Both you and your reverse mentoring partner must be open to learning from one another. So, remain respectful, and listen actively  without any preconceived ideas. Don't get frustrated if your partner doesn't understand the skills you're trying to share. Instead, communicate with tact  , and give encouraging feedback that does not belittle his knowledge. Use constructive feedback  to help him understand your perspective. 5. Measure Your Progress Check in regularly to ensure that you are both happy with the relationship, and that you're getting the information you need. However, if you are not making your desired progress, schedule a brainstorming  session and discuss new ways to achieve your goals. Key Points A junior team member and a more experienced colleague can "pair up" to their mutual advantage in a reverse mentoring partnership. This can benefit both parties in a number of ways that will enhance their careers. For example, they can share technology skills and generational insight, improve their leadership and communication skills, and gain new perspectives. Reverse mentoring can also improve understanding and collaboration in the workplace, and close generational gaps. If you enter into a reverse mentoring partnership, make sure you choose the right partner who offers skills and knowledge that you lack. Ensure that you can add value too – these partnerships are two-way streets. You need to set clear goals and expectations when you've found the right person, and schedule regular meetings. You also need to demonstrate strong communication skills and remain open-minded to ensure that the reverse mentoring relationship is a success.
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What Are Soft Skills?

What Are Soft Skills? | Ten skills that employers want | Scoop.it
Hiring managers typically look for job candidates with particular hard skills and soft skills. Hard skills are job-specific skills and knowledge you need to perform a job. You can often gain hard skills through education, training programs, certifications, and on-the-job training. These are typically quantifiable skills that can be easily defined and evaluated. For example, a hard skill for an IT professional might be computer programming, while a hard skill for a carpenter might be a knowledge of wood framing. Soft skills, on the other hand, are interpersonal (people) skills. These are much harder to define and evaluate. While hard skills are job-specific, most employers are looking for similar soft skills in their job candidates. Soft skills include communication skills, listening skills, and empathy, among others. Read below for a more detailed definition of soft skills and some tips for emphasizing your soft skills while job searching. What Are Soft Skills? Soft skills are the personal attributes, personality traits, inherent social cues, and communication abilities needed for success on the job. Soft skills characterize how a person interacts in his or her relationships with others. Unlike hard skills that are learned, soft skills are similar to emotions or insights that allow people to “read” others. These are much harder to learn, at least in a traditional classroom. They are also much harder to measure and evaluate. Soft skills include attitude, communication, creative thinking, work ethic, teamwork, networking, decision making, positivity, time management, motivation, flexibility, problem-solving, critical thinking, and conflict resolution. Here's more information on the difference between hard skills and soft skills, and here is a longer list of soft skills. Why Do Employers Care About Soft Skills? It is easy to understand why employers want job candidates with particular hard skills. After all, if you are hiring a carpenter, he or she needs skills in carpentry. However, soft skills are important to the success of almost all employers. After all, nearly every job requires employees to engage with others in some way. Therefore, being able to interact well with others is important in any job. Another reason hiring managers and employers look for applicants with soft skills is because soft skills are transferable skills that can be used regardless of the job at which the person is working. This makes job candidates with soft skills very adaptable employees. Also, because soft skills are acquired over time as opposed to during a class or training program, people with soft skills are often seen as having unique and broad backgrounds that can diversify a company and help it run more efficiently. Soft skills are particularly important in customer-based jobs. These employees will typically be in direct contact with customers. It takes a number of soft skills to be able to listen to a customer, and provide that customer with helpful and polite service. Tips for Highlighting Your Soft Skills First, make a list of the soft skills you have that are relevant to the job you want. Look at a list of soft skills, and circle the ones that you have. Then, compare your list of soft skills with the job listing. Which of these soft skills are mentioned in the listing? Which of these do you think would be most useful in this job? Make list of 3-5 soft skills you have that are also needed for the job. Then, include some of these soft skills in your resume. You can add them to a skills section (or a section titled “Transferable Skills”). You can also use them as keywords throughout your resume, mentioning them in places such as your resume summary, and in descriptions of your duties for each job in your "Work History" section. You can also mention these soft skills in your cover letter. Pick one or two soft skills you have that are most important for the job. In your cover letter, provide evidence that shows you have those particular skills. Finally, you can highlight these soft skills in your interviews. You can mention examples of times you have displayed some of these skills in the past at work. However, you can also demonstrate your soft skills during the interview. For example, by being friendly and approachable during the interview, you will show your ability to interact with others. By being a good listener while the interviewer is talking, you will show your listening skills. These actions will demonstrate your soft skills clearly to the hiring manager.
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The Most Valuable Social Media and Web-Based Digital Skills for Marketers

The Most Valuable Social Media and Web-Based Digital Skills for Marketers | Ten skills that employers want | Scoop.it
By coupling web-based digital skills with strong writing and creative skills, a marketing professional can increase their career opportunities and salary.
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What You Need To Do Before Making A Major Career Transition

Members of Forbes Coaches Council discuss their top tips for successfully transitioning into a new career.
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The 10 skills you'll need to land a CIO job

The 10 skills you'll need to land a CIO job | Ten skills that employers want | Scoop.it
A mix of leadership, business, and technology skills dominate the list, according to Indeed.
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College and Career Ready: Preparing Students With the Skills They Need to Succeed

College and Career Ready: Preparing Students With the Skills They Need to Succeed | Ten skills that employers want | Scoop.it
Guest post by Renee Trotier One of our recent Rockwood Summit High School (RSHS) graduates came back for a visit after a few months of college. His observation was that the course content was not a problem, but the most important aspect for success in college was actually time management. The conversation stuck with me because I learned this same lesson the hard way from my own children as they embarked on their freshman year of college. My son said, “In high school, the bell rings and you simply go to the next class.” In college, he didn’t feel prepared to use the open time in his schedule in a productive way when he could choose to simply take a nap or socialize with friends. This year, RSHS has expanded our view of what it means to be college and career ready, and our staff has identified “soft skills,” which we call “essential skills” to focus on schoolwide, including: Self-management Self-awareness Interpersonal skills Collaboration Communication Creativity Problem-solving We have worked to integrate development in these areas—along with literacy and technical skills—across the curriculum. Our staff identified these skills from our study of CASEL’s work on social and emotional learning; Framework for 21st Century Learning; and the “Redesigning the High School Experience” report conducted for our district by Hanover Research. RSHS, like most other high schools, has fantastic opportunities for students to develop these essential skills in a robust offering of extracurricular activities. We also have some unique opportunities for students to hone their skills through meaningful long-term projects in and out of the classroom such as our student-run radio station and our biofuel project, where our chemistry students make fuel from recycled kitchen grease to power a truck they converted to diesel, district lawn equipment, and even a school bus. We also have new cross-curricular courses including Geometry in Construction, where our students are partnering with a faith-based charitable organization to build a tiny house that will be used as transitional housing for homeless people, and an AMPED class where students apply Algebra I skills to their student-run business. Our freshman seminar students do “genius hour” projects as the frame for their library orientation. I could create a huge list of innovative projects and assignments that students engage in through individual classes and activities. I am very proud of our school; however, I am keenly aware that these rich opportunities are not part of every student’s day at our school. The truth is that the majority of our students move between seven unrelated classes, and their work is done between bells or on their own at home. When every minute of our school day is scheduled and planned for students, it’s difficult for them to truly develop those essential skills that we know they need to be college and career ready no matter how well-planned those minutes are. Our role as school leaders is to cultivate more innovative learning experiences and provide less structured environments in order to help students develop these essential skills. Our goal is for every student to be able to make independent choices to support their own learning and take control of their own education. How does your school develop these essential skills for all students? Renee Trotier, EdD, has been a teacher, instructional coach, and administrator in the Rockwood School District for 25 years. She currently serves as the principal of Rockwood Summit High School and has been recognized as the Principal of the Year by the St. Louis Association of Secondary School Principals as well as the Missouri Association of Secondary School Principals. Follow her on Twitter @RSHSPrincipal.
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The 48 Most Essential Marketing Skills You Need to Be Successful

The 48 Most Essential Marketing Skills You Need to Be Successful | Ten skills that employers want | Scoop.it
In this post, you'll learn the 48 most important skills modern marketers need to succeed. Plus, download your free guide walking through an 11-step process you can apply to learn any new marketing skill.
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Seven Alternatives To 'Thank You' That Will Improve Your Communication Skills

Seven Alternatives To 'Thank You' That Will Improve Your Communication Skills | Ten skills that employers want | Scoop.it
Switch up how you express gratitude to foster deeper relationships with your team.
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3 TED Talks To Improve Your Communication Skills

3 TED Talks To Improve Your Communication Skills | Ten skills that employers want | Scoop.it
Effective communication is often the key to solving so many of our problems, and yet, it isn’t always easy.
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‘I use presentation and communication skills on a daily basis’

‘I use presentation and communication skills on a daily basis’ | Ten skills that employers want | Scoop.it
Shirin Poeplinghaus is a senior customer trainer at Zendesk. Here, she talks about what her role is like and the important skills she needs.
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