Temperature At Which Pages Burn
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Temperature At Which Pages Burn
A futuristic classic applicable to today's society!
Curated by Caroline OKane
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US cable reveals Google's motives for China censorship | Security | ZDNet UK

US cable reveals Google's motives for China censorship | Security | ZDNet UK | Temperature At Which Pages Burn | Scoop.it
Google kept quiet about how China's internet bottleneck influenced its decision to allow state censorship, to avoid other countries following suit,...

 

Many would argue the fact that the Internet is the most vast informational resource that is readily available to almost anyone, anywhere. The growth of technology has led to the development of bottomless search engines that in a democratic nation like America, experiences mild, if any, forms of censorship. Google, the most popular search engine of our time, has maintained a very tumultuous relationship with China, a communist nation fond of using censorship as a method of keeping order among its people and avoiding chaos. Similarly, the goal to eliminate revolutionizing ideas in the society featured in Bradbury’s “Fahrenheit 451” was a method of keeping order among the people and avoiding potential deviation and ultimately, chaos. In addition to possible outcomes, the Chinese administration have grown extra careful surrounding the Internet access this is available after the revolutionary activity in Egypt was orchestrated through methods of technology. It is possible that censorship is trying to avoid just that, disorder, however the problem, as seen in the novel, occurs when the people no longer have access to the ongoings of the past, as a mere benchmark of lessons to learn from. In the book, Clarisse’s probing questions open the eyes of Guy Montag, who begins to challenge the intent of firefighters altogether, and who begins to wonder about something far more vital- happiness. It takes a minute conversation for the man to begin to understand that both his career and his drug-addicted spouse do not fulfill him- this does not signify stupidity, but rather signifies the an underdeveloped individual, a product of their limited surroundings.

 

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Ron Paul's World

Ron Paul's World | Temperature At Which Pages Burn | Scoop.it
A penchant for conspiracy theories has been a constant throughout his political career.

 

Newt Gingrich, the former Speaker of the House, currently in the running for a position as candidate on behalf of the Republican party on the 2012 ballot, recently announced publicly that he would not vote for his fellow presidential candidate, Ron Paul, should he be selected as nominee. Due to newsletter publications from the 1970s thought to be written by Paul, speculations of bigotry have been brought to fruition and thus influenced the sentiments of his supporters. Information that supports the notion that Paul entertains infamous conspiracy theories relating to the supposed “underlying cause” of the 9/11 terrorist attacks stemming from the United States federal government itself or “some other shadowy force” rather than Al-Qaeda, has surfaced over the course of his campaign. Perhaps Paul has admittedly taken responsibility for the larger issues at hand within the nation rather than to attentively engage in conspiracy theories that may or may not be. His minor yet existent association with the extensive controversy is impacting his crusade for presidency to a certain extent, introducing him to various individuals he recognizes as “true patriots”, deviating from social norms rather than “zombies”, or those who “just go along” and pay income tax. Although the parallel may be far-fetched, it is undoubtedly so that a population of those who “just go along” would create a “homogenized population” via the promotion of ignorance. Ignorance, a theme made severely apparent in the novel of Fahrenheit 451, is produced through the elimination of knowledge obtained through the information found in books.

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Occupy Wall Street censorship: A relative question

Occupy Wall Street censorship: A relative question | Temperature At Which Pages Burn | Scoop.it
A relative phenomenon...

 

Fragmentary reporting and the omitting of critical components of the Occupy Wall Street movement’s media coverage can all be considered legitimate modes of censorship, qualifying under modern United States standards. In a passionate editorial published in the Washington Post, the author suggests that only under the standards of the Soviet Union during the mid to late 1950s, do the actions of the New York Police Department qualify as an “international beacon of transparency” and fair play. The movement itself can be seen as the most instantaneous in terms of influencing smaller demonstrations in a variety of American cities- Boston, Oakland, and Washington, D.C., to name a few. The initial publicizing of the movement’s activity was minimal, quite similarly to the the news coverage and ultimate goals of the society illustrated through Ray Bradbury’s highly acclaimed “Fahrenheit 451” in that the government held it critical to eliminate any opposition to society and socially accepted behaviors. Censorship marks a totalitarian approach to national order, just as the society in which Guy Montag, a firefighter, was expected to ignite rather than stop fires, in an attempt to reduce the availability of knowledge by means of burning books and the ideas they contained. The Occupy Wall Street movement quickly became noted for the many celebrities that were endorsing the movement and the process of giving power back to the people, and for the camp-like community forming in the financial district of Manhattan. The movement undeniably awakened a sense of solidarity in some quantity within all Americans, and brought awareness to the mindlessness of many. Television and radio, both increasingly popular forms of entertainment, were featured in Bradbury’s novel, as mindless behavior was the norm.

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