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Teacher Education for Languages with Technology / Formation des enseignants de langue avec les TICE
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Group work and interaction in language learning classrooms

Group work and interaction in language learning classrooms | TELT | Scoop.it
Interesting tidbits on interaction and small group learning in the second language classroom
Shona Whyte's insight:

Phil Chappell has a really nice collection of links to all sorts of information on group work for (English) language learning, including research articles (open access), video practice examples, reading references, and he's taken the time to explain why he selected each.  Great resource!

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Teachers’ Classroom Language Use: Rabbidge & Chappell 2014

The teaching of English as a foreign language in South Korean public schools has seen the implementation of a number of new innovations. One such innovation, the teaching of English through English, dubbed TETE, is a government-initiated policy that requires public schools to teach English by only using English. Nevertheless, studies reveal that teachers are not implementing the policy. The current study, through a series of observations and interviews, ascertained that teachers were not implementing the government policy at the elementary-school level due to a conflict in government decrees, making it difficult for them to teach English by only using English while maintaining student motivation to learn English. The study reveals the importance that teachers place on the belief that motivation needs to be maintained at all costs, even superseding the need to maximize target language exposure. The paper calls for further studies of teachers who have established techniques to maintain student motivations for learning the target language while teaching exclusively in the target language, as well as touching upon the idea of the need for an alternative to the TETE policy.

Shona Whyte's insight:

Interesting analysis of classroom use of L1 and TL by Korean elementary school teachers, who seem to be resisting official guidelines by using L1 to maintain motivation.

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TESOL Teaching and Learning Websites

TESOL Teaching and Learning Websites | TELT | Scoop.it

This page contains useful links for English Language Teachers. There are five categories:


1 News, Articles, Newsworthy Blogs. These resources are a good start for teachers setting up their Personal Learning Network (PLN).
   

2 Lesson plans, activities and resources.
   

3 Meta-sites. These websites host a vast range of resources for TESOL educators.
   

4 Technology for Language Teachers. These resources will help you get established using technology for professional development as well as for teaching.
   

5 Resources for Young Learners. These resources are aimed specifically at young learners, a group usually defined by the age range 6-12 years.

Shona Whyte's insight:

Phil Chappell has this extensive list of useful links.

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Strategies for interacting with students

Strategies for interacting with students | TELT | Scoop.it

Shona Whyte:

Phil Chappell has distilled this list of do's and don'ts for teachers interested in promoting learner interaction in the language classroom from Mercer and Howe's (2012) paper in Learning, Culture and Social Interaction (as he says, "publicly available for now," the link is in his blog post):

 

- use some ‘open’ questions to explore students’ ideas
- encourage students to put knowledge into their own words (while also offering them new vocabulary to accommodate new ideas)
- press students to elaborate and justify their views, e.g. ‘How did you know that?’, ‘Why?’, ‘Can you say a bit more?’
- allow students extended turns to express their thoughts and reveal their misunderstandings
- hold back demonstrations or explanations until the ideas of some students have been heard (so that explanations can be linked to what has been said and to issues raised)
- give students enough time to construct thoughtful answers to questions, rather than moving quickly on if they are hesitant
- use whole class discussion to help students see the point and purpose of their study of a topic
- at least sometimes, allow students’ comments to shift the direction of a discussion (and even, perhaps, of a lesson!)
- ‘model’ ways of using language to conduct rational arguments, so that students can learn by example. (Mercer & Howe, 2012, pp. 17-18).

 

Phil Chappell has much more to say about this in his blog post, as well as other teaching and research references.

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