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Research into practice: Vocabulary (Nation, 2011)

Research into practice: Vocabulary (Nation, 2011) | TELT | Scoop.it

This article is a personal view of the application of research on vocabulary to teaching and how there are three different types or categories of relationship between that research and the teaching to which it is applied: first, where the research is not applied or not applied well, second, where it is reasonably well applied, and third, where it is over-applied. For each of these three categories, I look at what I consider to be the most important areas of research and suggest why they fit into that category. The topics covered include planning vocabulary courses, distinguishing high frequency and low frequency words, extensive reading, the deliberate learning of vocabulary, academic vocabulary and vocabulary teaching.

Shona Whyte's insight:

Here are my bullet points from reading this article which summarises recent research into L2 vocabulary acquisition for language teachers.

 

- there two types of vocabulary: high frequency and low frequency (Zipf's law - there is no middle ground).  ESL learners need to meet high frequency words often, and learn strategies to tackle low frequency words

 

- extensive (rather than intensive) reading with graded readers works for high frequency words; learners can be encouraged in this if initial class time is devoted to a "proper extensive reading program" (p. 532)

 

- bilingual word cards - "deliberate decontextualised rote learning of vocabulary" - is effective for long-term learning and acquisition of implicit knowledge (p. 533)  though should be viewed as a "support" rather than an "alternative to communicative learning"

 

- although deliberate learning is effective, deliberate teaching does not mean deliberate learning - studies often show less than half of taught words were learned via vocabulary exercises

 

Nation recommends paying attention to vocabulary learning via extensive graded reading and independent learning with bilingual word cards, rather than devoting class time to intensive reading and vocabulary exercises.

 

He recommends this research paper:

Elgort, I. (2011). Deliberate learning and vocabulary acquisition in a second language. Language Learning, 61.2, 367–413.

 

and this website: The Compleat Lexical Tutor http://www.lextutor.ca/

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Teacher Education for Languages with Technology / Formation des enseignants de langue avec les TICE
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Qu’est-ce qui s’est passé ? Des questions stéréotypées chez les apprenants du français

Qu’est-ce qui s’est passé ? Des questions stéréotypées chez les apprenants du français | TELT | Scoop.it
Despite a good command of the grammar and the pronunciation of one’s second language, a non-native speaker often remains identifiable by his way of formulating his utterances, which do not necessarily correspond to those formulations found to be natural by native speakers of his new language. Difficulties associated with what Bardovi-Harlig (2009) called conventional expressions are most particularly found in the area of pragmatics, and these difficulties have attracted more and more interest from researchers in second language acquisition. The current article contributes to this research trend with an examination of a corpus constiting of responses to a discourse completion task completed by native speakers of French and Anglophone learners of French, with the goal of identifying those linguistic sequences preferred by the two groups in their realization of the speech act of questionning. The results reveal important differences between the natives’ and nonnatives’ use of linguistic stereotypes in formulating questions. In particular, the nonnatives tend to establish a one-to-one association between a linguistic string and a type of question.
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Prononcer les langues : appel à contribution

Prononcer les langues : appel à contribution | TELT | Scoop.it
Le numéro est à paraître en mai 2019. Les résumés (3 pages) sont à envoyer avant le 1er avril 2018 aux adresses suivantes : gregory.miras@univ-rouen.fr ; laurence.vignes@univ-rouen.fr
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Language teachers’ perceptions on the use of OER language processing technologies in MALL

(2018). Language teachers’ perceptions on the use of OER language processing technologies in MALL. Computer Assisted Language Learning. Ahead of Print.
Shona Whyte's insight:
Survey by Perez Paredes and colleagues suggests  FL teachers in UK and Spain support technology mediated learning in theory more than in practice, particularly with respect to mobile devices and more sophisticated corpus tools
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