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Teacher Education for Languages with Technology / Formation des enseignants de langue avec les TICE
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Englishes in Practice: Jenkins, 2015

Englishes in Practice: Jenkins, 2015 | TELT | Scoop.it

In the relatively few years since empirical research into English as a Lingua Franca began being conducted more widely, the field has developed and expanded remarkably, and in myriad ways. In particular, researchers have explored ELF from the perspective of a range of linguistic levels and in an ever-increasing number of sociolinguistic contexts, as well as its synergies with the field of Intercultural Communication and its meaning for the fields of Second Language Acquisition and English as a Foreign Language. The original orientation to ELF communication focused heavily, if not exclusively, on form. In light of increasing empirical evidence, this gave way some years later to an understanding that it is the processes underlying these forms that are paramount, and hence to a focus on ELF users and ELF as social practice. It is argued in this article, however, that ELF is in need of further retheorisation in respect of its essentially multilingual nature: a nature that has always been present in ELF theory and empirical work, but which, I believe, has not so far been sufficiently foregrounded. This article therefore attempts to redress the balance by taking ELF theorisation a small step further in its evolution.

Shona Whyte's insight:

New article by Jennifer Jenkins, open access

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Research in English as a lingua franca: Jenkins, Cogo & Dewey, 2011

Shona Whyte's insight:

Some quotes:

- "native English pronunciation is not optimum in ELF communication contexts."  

- ELF refers to "an additionally acquired language system which serves as a common means of communication for speakers of different first languages" (this definition includes native speakers of English; VOICE, Seidelhofer).  

- ELF users "are not the ‘failed native speakers’ of EFL, but – more often – highly skilled communicators who make use of their multilingual resources in ways not available to monolingual NSEs, and who are found to prioritize successful communication over narrow notions of ‘correctness’ in ways that NSEs, with their stronger attachment to their native English, may find more challenging." 

- Jenkins research showed "certain English pronunciation features (essentially consonant sounds apart from the dental fricatives /T/ and /D/, initial consonant clusters, vowel length distinctions, and nuclear stress) contributed significantly to intelligibility in the ELF interactions being studied. On the other hand, they showed that certain other features (e.g. weak forms, elisions, assimilations) did not appear to contribute to intelligibility in these interactions and may

even have detracted from it"

- call for awareness raising and action research

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