TELT
62.2K views | +11 today
Follow
TELT
Teacher Education for Languages with Technology / Formation des enseignants de langue avec les TICE
Curated by Shona Whyte
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Shona Whyte
Scoop.it!

Plurilingual expatriate teachers ’ in Higher Education : roles and impacts

Under the label ‘international’, synonymous with modernity and attractiveness, English, often portrayed as ‘the language of internationalization’ . The aim of this special issue is to pay a closer look not only on the policy of English as academia lingua franca , but also on other linguistic contexts and constellations in the following scenarios:
- teachers whose first language is the institutional/local langue and teach in another language;
- teachers whose first language is not the institutional/local language teach in the institutional/local language;
- teachers whose first language is not the institutional/local language teach in another language .
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Shona Whyte
Scoop.it!

English Wordlists for teaching and learning EFL/ESL

English Wordlists for teaching and learning EFL/ESL | TELT | Scoop.it
On his Wordlists page, @muranava has a curated selection of English wordlists, both general and subject-specific. Find information about the General Service Word List, the Academic Word List, as well as specific corpora and recent updates to available resources.   @muranava teaches EFL in higher education (engineering, business) in Paris, so some lists reflect that…
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Shona Whyte
Scoop.it!

Pronunciation links for EFL students

Pronunciation links for EFL students | TELT | Scoop.it
UnPolish your English, learning pronunciation, teaching pronunciation, links for students, accents, pron
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Shona Whyte
Scoop.it!

What Do We Know about the Best Practices for Teaching Vocabulary? Horst (CMLR)

Learners of a new language need to acquire a huge amount of vocabulary. To get a sense of the size of the task, consider the following: Investigations of reading comprehension consistently show that learners of English have good understanding of a text written for native speakers only when an average of one word (or less) in every 50 is unfamiliar. It is estimated that knowledge of as many as 8,000 (!) word families is needed to reach that criterion. (The term “family” refers to a base word and its inflected and derived forms. For example, the sharp family includes sharper, sharpen, sharply, unsharpened, sharpness, and so on.) Since the task is clearly very large, it is important that vocabulary teaching be as efficient and effective as possible. The recommendations that follow are made with that reality in mind.

Shona Whyte's insight:
Et en français pour ceux qui le préfère (traduction proposée en bas de page)
more...