TELT
63.1K views | +4 today
Follow
TELT
Teacher Education for Languages with Technology / Formation des enseignants de langue avec les TICE
Curated by Shona Whyte
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Shona Whyte
Scoop.it!

Using action research to explore technology in language teaching: international perspectives: Burns & Kurtoglu-Hooton, 2016

Using action research to explore technology in language teaching: international perspectives: Burns & Kurtoglu-Hooton, 2016 | TELT | Scoop.it

This study provides an investigation of the processes and practices involved in conducting action research on the use of ICT and new technologies in the classroom as experienced by 12 teachers located across different international contexts, from Europe, the Middle East and Asia.

Shona Whyte's insight:
Open access PDF - looks interesting. I'm using Edwards and Willis with new EFL teachers in French secondary schools, and Gonzalez-Lloret for the tech part. Perhaps this will also be useful.
more...
Rescooped by Shona Whyte from Group work and interaction in language learning classrooms
Scoop.it!

Concepts for Teaching Speaking in the English Language Classroom | Burns | LEARN Journal: Language Education and Acquisition Research Network

Concepts for Teaching Speaking in the English Language Classroom


Via Phil Chappell
Shona Whyte's insight:

Burns says not do "do" speaking but "teach" speaking, and provides reasons and examples

more...
Phil Chappell's curator insight, January 22, 2016 7:07 PM
Abstract Systematically and explicitly addressing the teaching of speaking is an aspect of English language teaching that is often underestimated. While teachers may be presenting various speaking activities in the classroom, such activities may amount to ‘doing speaking’ rather than ‘teaching speaking’. In this article, I argue that being a competent teacher of speaking involves understanding the ‘combinatorial’ nature of speaking, which includes the linguistic and discoursal features of speech, the core speaking skills that enable speakers to process and produce speech, and the communication strategies for managing and maintaining spoken interactions. The article concludes by presenting a ‘teaching-speaking cycle’ (Goh and Burns, 2012) that teachers can use to plan tasks and activities that explicitly address these aspects of speaking and that scaffold student learning
Sacra Jáimez's curator insight, February 5, 2016 8:34 AM

An insightful article on how teaching speaking should be planned to help learners become more aware and autonomous in dealing with an speaking task inside the classroom or once outside in the real world.

 

Scooped by Shona Whyte
Scoop.it!

Teacher-researchers in action

Opening articles by Burns, Allwright and Smith; case studies from Turkey.

 

Allwright says:

 

1. That ‘research’ and ‘development’ are both essentially about getting understanding, so teacher-research for teacher development needs to be centred on working to understand, rather than on finding immediate solutions to practical classroom problems.

2. That learners need (and want) to understand at least as much as teachers do. That they do not think they get much help from teachers in this. And that our learners deserve all the help we can provide for them to develop their understandings.

Shona Whyte's insight:

Looks like an interesting collection

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Shona Whyte
Scoop.it!

Burns, Katz & Freeman on teacher education (online): IATEFL 2014

Burns, Katz & Freeman on teacher education (online): IATEFL 2014 | TELT | Scoop.it
Shona Whyte's insight:

Research in language teacher education

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Shona Whyte
Scoop.it!

Teacher/Practitioner Research: Wyatt, Burns & Hanks 2016

There is growing interest in educational research conducted by teachers and other practitioners in learning environments. There is also a growing willingness among educators to discuss such research in environments that are open and online. However, for some of those engaging with such forms of inquiry in such online spaces, puzzles remain. For example, for it to count as ‘research’, does teacher/practitioner ‘research’ have to be shared? Can this happen in non-academic ways, and why is this beneficial? In what ways is teacher/practitioner research valuable in itself as an activity? What forms of such research are open to teachers, how are they similar and how do they differ? What are the defining characteristics of one of these forms, ‘exploratory practice’, and what does it look like in practice? What kinds of support are required so that teacher/practitioner research is a more viable activity for both teachers and their learners?

These were some of the questions raised in a recent online discussion involving teachers and academics from all over the world. It provided dialogic learning opportunities and encouraged a sharing of insights from educators working from different perspectives but united in the common cause of supporting deeply ethical, empowering teacher/practitioner research. This article represents the moderators’ reflective summary of the discussion, produced with a view to disseminating current ideas on this topic and stimulating further debate.