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Teacher Education for Languages with Technology / Formation des enseignants de langue avec les TICE
Curated by Shona Whyte
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PPP or TBLT?

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Another go at the long-running discussion on teaching methods and second language acquisition/learning
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Using the Brain to Discover the Mind: John Anderson

Using the Brain to Discover the Mind: John Anderson | TELT | Scoop.it
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2012 Psychonomic Society keynote, slides and video, starts 9:33.

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optionsciencepo's curator insight, November 8, 2013 9:46 AM

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Why practice makes perfect sense: Anderson, 2016

Among the many lesson planning paradigms used in English language teacher education over the last 40 years, PPP has proven to be one of the most popular and most durable (see Figure 1) despite regular criticism in literature emanating from the Anglophone centre of ELT theory. After presenting a brief history of the paradigm and outlining the main criticisms directed at PPP, especially in the 1990s, I discuss some important research findings from SLA studies since the turn of the century that lend support to PPP-type lesson structures. I briefly analyse parallels between PPP and other teaching paradigms deriving from skill learning theory, linking these paradigms to the expectations of many learners worldwide, and the organisation of content in many mainstream ELT coursebooks. I identify three potential contexts for using PPP, including that of primary and secondary teachers working in low- and middle-income countries, and describe a PPP lesson structure from my own work as a teacher and teacher trainer compatible with best Jason Anderson practice in mainstream teaching. While I caution that PPP cannot and should not be used to structure every lesson, I argue that it can be an appropriate and effective vehicle for the teaching of grammar, functional language and lexis, especially at lower levels of proficiency (up to B2), where the majority of ELT around the world happens, and is likely to happen for the foreseeable future (Graddol 2014).
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In defence of PPP.
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