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Health apps might succeed where self-help fails

Health apps might succeed where self-help fails | mHealth | Scoop.it
Apple Watch, Simband, and Google Fit may be able to change behaviors that diet books, yoga videos, and self-help seminars have largely failed to achieve.
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Open thread: Microsoft Health's big advantage is cross-platform support

Open thread: Microsoft Health's big advantage is cross-platform support | mHealth | Scoop.it

Microsoft has been winning generally approving headlines for its Microsoft Band fitness tracker and accompanying Microsoft Health platform, since both were revealed – seemingly unintentionally at first – on Wednesday.

 

One of the key points about both hardware and software is their cross-platform nature: they won’t just be restricted to people with a Windows Phone smartphone and/or a computer running the Windows OS. They’ll also support Android, iOS and Mac.

 

Microsoft Health is also open to other devices and apps, with Jawbone’s Up and the apps MapMyFitness, MyFitnessPal and RunKeeper the first to be announced.


Via Alex Butler, Celine Sportisse, eMedToday
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Laurent FLOURET's curator insight, October 31, 2014 9:19 AM

“We plan to have a regular cadence of Microsoft Health announcements including additional device and service partnerships, SDK availability and additional cross-platform applications and services,” blogged Microsoft’s Todd Holmdahl.

Bart Collet's comment, October 31, 2014 12:23 PM
true! aggregate or die!
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Fitbit has new 'Charge' fitness trackers on the way

Fitbit has new 'Charge' fitness trackers on the way | mHealth | Scoop.it
Fitbit ran into some unfortunate issues with its Force fitness tracker; skin reactions eventually led the company to issue a voluntary recall and abandon sales of the product altogether. But now it...

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Putting Quality on the Global Health Agenda — NEJM

Perspective from The New England Journal of Medicine — Putting Quality on the Global Health Agenda
Ver2DigiMed's insight:

Access to healthcare improves patient outcomes. 

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4 Wearables That Give You Superpowers

4 Wearables That Give You Superpowers | mHealth | Scoop.it
Super strength. Super hearing. Super artistry. Super expression. The future of wearables is really a quest for human enhancement.

Via JP DOUMENG
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COM SALUD's curator insight, September 30, 2014 12:41 PM

Para hablar de las posibilidades de los wearables en la salud, desde la agencia COM SALUD hemos organizado el I Congreso de Wearables y Big Data en Salud, el próximo 18 de noviembre en Madrid. Profesionales de la salud, técnicos de sistemas, gestores sanitarios, laboratorios y desarrolladores darán su opinión sobre un campo que está llamado a cambiar la asistencia sanitaria. El esquema es similar al del I Congreso de Juegos de Salud, que organizamos en mayo, y que se convirtió en el segundo hashtag de salud en el mundo, y cuyas plazas se agotaron dos semanas antes. 

Art Jones's curator insight, October 4, 2014 12:46 PM

Excerpt:

He points to the modern smartphone as his evidence. It’s already given us the opportunity to fly through space (through maps or video conferencing), travel through time (through our photos or social networks), and increase our intelligence (through omnipresent Internet access). To him, wearables will just be “more literal extensions” of these powers. They’ll offer us everything from more coordination to improved hearing. And it’s the quest for these powers that will drive user adoption.

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How biosensors could put a smartphone at the center of 21st-century medical care

How biosensors could put a smartphone at the center of 21st-century medical care | mHealth | Scoop.it

Biosensors are on the verge of changing the way we use our smartphones to investigate the world around us.

A few years ago, University of Illinois engineer Brian Cunningham hosted an alumnus who’d made a fortune developing one of the earliest iPhone apps. “This person made a gazillion dollars on some trivial game,” he recalled with an incredulous laugh. “I thought, ‘there must be something better you can do with a smartphone.’”

Earlier in his career, after his parents died relatively young and within a few years of each other of lymphoma and prostate cancer, the electrical and computer engineering professor decided to shift his focus from biosensors for military applications like heat-sensing missiles to monitoring one’s health.

“Rather than bombing people, I decided to work on biosensors that could help diagnose disease,” he told me in a recent interview.

Brian Cunningham, University of Illinois

And his meeting with that wealthy game developer would prove to be another game changer. Cunningham gathered a group of students who agreed to volunteer their time for their senior design project developing a cradle and app for the iPhone 4 that would be capable of detecting a wide range of chemical and biological agents.

Their achievement made a big splash, but Cunningham said they’ve already gone well beyond it with additional work, and the future of smartphones that come equipped with built-in biosensors and dedicated cameras could be just a few years away.

To be clear, biosensors have been hot for years now. Sensors currently exist or are being tested for their ability to detect a wide range of targets, including:

gases like methane and sarinexplosives like TNTchemicals like isopropyl alcoholfoodborne bugs like salmonella and listeriaallergens like peanutswater contaminants like lead and pesticidesand infectious diseases like influenza and HIV

But it’s only in the past few years that more scientists have been developing ones that can or will be integrated into smartphones. Cunningham’s cradle, for instance, is in its worst light a clunky piece of extra hardware most people aren’t going to lug around every day. Integrating the sensor into the phone itself, and adding a second camera dedicated to biosensing instead of selfies, is the next step.

Based on the interest Cunningham is getting from phone developers and end users, he predicts this advancement is coming in just two or three years.

 

And then there’s the $10M Qualcomm Tricorder XPRIZE, which has 10 finalist teams from six countries working to build a “consumer-focused mobile device” that can not only capture five health metrics but also diagnose and interpret 15 different medical conditions. Teams are expected to showcase a range of next-gen biosensors behind their proposed devices when consumer testing begins in 2015. The winner is scheduled to be announced in early 2016.

 

Alex Hsieh, widely known for his work developing a fitness tracker for Atlas Wearables before being snatched up by Apple in June, isn’t so sure. The limiting factor when it comes to integrating all these sensors into gadgets, he said, is power consumption: “In the coming years more and more sensors will be added, whether to phones or watches, but I think the first issue that has to be addressed is power consumption. The more sensors you add on, the more battery draw.”

The wide range of biosensing applications could also act as a deterrent, he added, given people can be overwhelmed by too many choices. “It could take some time to get to a point where it’s useful data for the consumer,” he said. “And as soon as you overload, people start to not care, and that’s a line you should try not to cross.”

Overwhelming or not, the range of coming possibilities is certainly wide, and to people like Cunningham, tantalizing. A new mom could measure BPA levels in her breast milk or lead in her home’s water; a nurse could test for drug-resistant bacteria on the door knobs and light switches of a health clinic; a backpacker could check for contaminants in lake water; a teacher could confirm the absence or presence of peanuts in cafeteria food; a rancher could diagnose infectious disease on a cattle farm; an HIV positive patient could monitor viral load on a regular basis; the list goes on and on.

Here’s a quick snapshot of some of the latest biosensor research that is already adapted or being adapted to smartphones:

Cunningham’s cradle and app to detect a wide range of materialsCell-all sensor sniffs the air to detect toxins and biohazardsSERS substrate for detecting toxins and explosivesMagnetoelastic biosensor to detect foodborne illnessesSmarthpone-ready biosensor that takes its cue from turkeys

In Alex’s world, fitness is king. He acknowledged that his focus may bias him, but he sees the general consumer being most interested in measuring metrics like heart rate and sweat content for day-to-day health and fitness tracking. Testing for things like the flu or allergens have a time and a place, but when it comes to the general consumer, being able to detect things like explosives and gases is way too niche to justify spiking a phone’s battery consumption or overall cost.

How long it takes for biosensors to work their way into the vast majority of smartphones, and exactly what most of them will be used to detect, of course remains to be seen. But as the folks associated with Cell-all wrote: “The goal seems imminently achievable: Just as Bill Gates once envisioned a computer on every desk in every home, so [the Cell-all creator] envisions a chemical sensor in every cell phone in every pocket, purse, or belt holster.”

Related researchSubscriber Content

How the health care industry can benefit from open data

 


Via Alex Butler, ChemaCepeda, dbtmobile, eMedToday
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ChemaCepeda's curator insight, September 24, 2014 10:08 AM

Wearables, biosensores, big data, ... Se avecinan tiempos de recogida de millones de datos. ¿Seremos capaces de interpretarlos en el contexto de la salud? ¿Y de traducirlos en una mejor atención sanitaria?

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Top 10 Emergency Medicine Apps

Top 10 Emergency Medicine Apps | mHealth | Scoop.it

The following is a list of 10 essential medical apps Emergency Medicine providers should have on their smartphones. Links to iPhone and Android platforms are provided for each app. The apps are listed based on my experiences working in the Emergency Room and the app reviews that have been done prior at iMedicalApps.

1) EMRA PressorDex

An essential tool for Emergency Medicine physicians. This app not only includes information about vasoactive agents, but gives dosing and treatment information for almost every single type of critical care situation that arises.

Price: $16.99
iTunes Link
Android Link: Currently not available — it’s unfortunate EMRA has not created an Android version of their popular critical care handbook.

 

2) ERres

ERres is the swiss army knife of apps for Emergency Medicine providers. ERres is essential for all physicians who work in the ER setting due to the breadth of content contained. It can be used at the point of care for a wide acuity of conditions.

If there is one app you’re going to download from this list, ERres is going to be the most useful. The only reason it wasn’t the number one app was due to the significant amount of content contained in PressorDex.

Price: $4.99
iMedicalApps Review
iTunes Link
Android Link

 

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Via Emmanuel Capitaine , dbtmobile, eMedToday, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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Digital Health in Action - Smartphones Turn into Point-of-Care Diagnostic Tools for mHealth

Digital Health in Action - Smartphones Turn into Point-of-Care Diagnostic Tools for mHealth | mHealth | Scoop.it
Digital Health is a broad term which encompasses overlapping technology sectors across healthcare—as evidenced by our Venn diagram representing the Digital Health Landscape.

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How Old Industries Become Young Again

Five indicators reveal when your sector is about to be transformed by dematurity.
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Connected Health Devices Used by 27% of US Households, another 13% to Join in Within the Next Year

Connected Health Devices Used by 27% of US Households, another 13% to Join in Within the Next Year | mHealth | Scoop.it
Based on the research findings by Park Associates, 27% of U.S. broadband households currently own and use at least one connected health device. Park Associates shared the results at the Connected Health Summit: Engaging Consumers, held earlier this month in San Diego. The data is collected via a survey of more than 5000 US broadband households.

Via Philippe Marchal, eMedToday
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Apple’s HealthKit to Revolutionize Mobile Health Market, Say Analysts

Apple’s HealthKit to Revolutionize Mobile Health Market, Say Analysts | mHealth | Scoop.it
Linda Tian, GlobalData’s Analyst covering Medical Devices, says: “GlobalData believes that Apple’s strategy to unite medical applications, electronic health records and peripheral devices through a platform, reported to be the HealthKit, will be a ...

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What's The ROI Of A Smartphone Given To Patients With A Chronic Health Condition?

What's The ROI Of A Smartphone Given To Patients With A Chronic Health Condition? | mHealth | Scoop.it
Thanks to a pilot project announced today by Microsoft, TracFone and Health Choice Network (here) we're about to find out. Set to launch in January, the pilot project is designed to test the theory that smartphones can lower costs and manage chronic conditions like diabetes with better health outcomes. One big [...]
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Docs look to robots for imaging exams | Healthcare IT News

Robots have long promised big things for the healthcare industry, but concerns have been expressed over efficacy and limitations. One area, however, has demonstrated the considerable benefits robots bring to the table, according to two recent reports.
Ver2DigiMed's insight:

Telemedicine does not have to be expensive high tech equipment, this article gives examples of affordable and basic technologies that are currently readily available.

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Ver2DigiMed's curator insight, August 17, 2014 3:55 AM

Telemedicine does not have to be expensive high tech equipment, this article gives examples of affordable and basic technologies that are currently readily available.

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When will digital health go mainstream? When millennials are older and sicker

A panel discussion on mobile health at IMPACT 2014 varied from when it will go mainstream, people's comfort level with data sharing and telemedicine adoption.
Ver2DigiMed's insight:

“I think it will be 15-20 years until it is intertwined with medical care. It will take a shift away from fee-for-service and it will also take generational change. Millennials who grew up with technology will need to start getting sick.”


Interesting point, still an overshot on the timeline I believe. 

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Wearables and Quantified Self Demand Security-First Design | WIRED

Wearables and Quantified Self Demand Security-First Design | WIRED | mHealth | Scoop.it

As a wearable-tech enthusiast attending Black Hat Europe Amsterdam, I felt like I didn’t belong there and like I have lost my way. Black Hat, like Defcon, is one of the biggest information security events in the world that bring together everyone from the hacking community and information security enterprises. So Wearable Tech isn’t the first thing that comes to mind when you think of security, but the conference had me thinking, shouldn’t it be?

 


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Wireless devices are an increasingly substantial part of the $30B patient monitor market | mobihealthnews

Wireless devices are an increasingly substantial part of the $30B patient monitor market | mobihealthnews | mHealth | Scoop.it
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Apple's HealthKit Now Sends Medical Data Right to Your Health Record

Apple's HealthKit Now Sends Medical Data Right to Your Health Record | mHealth | Scoop.it
iHealth was the first company to sell a medical device through Apple, so it's only natural it's also the first to fully integrate its products with Apple's HealthKit. That means all the data iHealth's connected monitors and trackers collect not only gets sent straight to the app, it's also automagically logged in your electronic health record.

Via Alex Butler
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Olivia Klenda's curator insight, September 30, 2014 6:50 PM

The new HealthKit is a great way to keep track of your personal health records, exercise, and eating habits. 

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Why do docs think mHealth is useless for patient monitoring?

Physicians are still not sold on the benefits of mHealth to truly improve patient health, according to a new survey by Deloitte. (Why do docs think #mHealth is useless for #PatientMonitoring?

Via eMedToday, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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AMA: Make mHealth part of a better EHR | mHealthNews

AMA: Make mHealth part of a better EHR | mHealthNews | mHealth | Scoop.it
The organization calls for a radical change in how EHRs are developed, and says digital tools must be included in the new platforms.
Ver2DigiMed's insight:

"Given the rapid growth of digital technology in healthcare, whether for health and wellness, or the management of chronic illness, a comprehensive health information technology strategy must include interoperability between a patient's mobile technology, telehealth technology and the electronic health record"

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Enhancing Clinical Decisions through Mobile Health Devices

Enhancing Clinical Decisions through Mobile Health Devices | mHealth | Scoop.it
Enhancing Clinical Decisions through Mobile Health Devices (Study finds major use for smartphones is to access drug information and tablets used to access #medical #research.

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Mobile Devices: The Health Care Disruptor - Social Media Week

Mobile Devices: The Health Care Disruptor - Social Media Week | mHealth | Scoop.it

According to Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project (a survey designed to progressively track smartphone adoption) as of January 2014, 58% of American adults were in possession of a smartphone. Additionally, 42% of American adults owned a tablet computer. For the sake of comparison, Pew reported that merely 35% of American adults owned a smartphone back in May of 2011—that’s a 65% increase in users in less than 3 years. In examining this trend, it would be an understatement to say the influence and adoption rate of smartphone technology is less than ubiquitous.  And with 24/7 access to the digital world of social media, search engines and apps, businesses and entrepreneurs from virtually every industry fiercely compete for valuable eye time in hopes to maximize profits.

Don’t believe me? Go ahead and run a Google News search for the disruptor known as Uber, a company that is singlehandedly commandeering the taxi industry by way of mobile, and you’ll find hundreds of freshly updated articles spanning from sources such as the Wall Street Journal to NBC News. According to analysts, another highly lucrative industry ripe with opportunity is that of health care. About $6.7 billion ripe matter of fact and tech giants like Google, Apple and Microsoft are paying close attention. But what does this mean for the end user, their health and the health care industry as a whole?

UNDERSTANDING MOBILE SMART DEVICES AS THE HEALTH CARE DISRUPTOR

Massoud Alibakhsh, the CEO of a prominent medical billing software company by the name of NueMD, paints a very clear picture of how mobile devices are quickly establishing themselves as the central disrupting force in the field health care. “From one side, the new generation of physicians started adopting these devices because: A. [they] found it more convenient to have a small device in their hand as opposed to five different books. So, the market responded to that and started building some of those apps,” says Massoud. He then expands on the subsequent advancements that improved the way in which we interact with mobile devices, such as reduced production costs associated with increased memory and processor speed, and the development of the cloud. Benefits that were once tied to practitioners’ stationary desktop computers and clunky laptops now extend to pocket-sized tools capable of granting access to patient data from pretty much anywhere and at anytime.

Today, smartphone compatible medical devices and apps work as weight scales, blood pressure cuffs and pulse oximeters. These functions not only encourage patients to take a role in their own health, but the data pulled from such tools can be systematically recorded, graphed and analyzed by trained medical professionals to better understand the health and lifestyles of their patients. There is even a website called iMedicalApps that reports on and reviews the latest and greatest medical apps used by patients and professionals alike.

CONNECTING PHYSICIANS AND PATIENTS VIA MOBILE

In an inspiring reality, patients and practitioners alike are using the same types of devices that run on the same operating systems. This improves app viability because data exchanges can occur more fluidly. For instance take the e-Consult My Doctor app, a doctor-patient communication platform that allows patients and practitioners to engage in what they call e-consulting dialogs. Patients must manage their own personal health record (PHR) in order to participate. The doctor can extend the conversation to a maximum of 10 messages as means to prevent losing too much time in a conversation. Plus, as these doctor-patient messaging platforms evolve and improve over time, doctors will better help patients determine whether a visit to the emergency room or doctor’s office is even necessary in the first place—thus reducing the burden commonly associated with triage clinics. Of course, there are many security concerns that must be ironed out before this emerges as a widely adopted practice.

Here’s an obvious statement: mobile technology has drastically increased the time in which we spend on social media. However, understanding the actual breakdown is quite fascinating.

72% of all internet users engage on social media (that’s a ton of people)71% of social media users do so on mobile devices (does not exclude users who engage across desktop machines, too)Approximately 60% (6 out of every 10 hours) of all time spent on social media is done so via mobile devices alone (excluding desktop machines)

It appears mobile is the primary artery for social media, which has major implications for physicians and how they use the two in tandem to consume and disseminate information. Today, physicians have the ability to use social networks to crowdsource answers to clinical questions. This can be done through a trusted physician-only social network called Sermo that serves as a collective intelligence comprised of over 270,000 qualified doctors from more than 90 specialties. Platforms like Sermo can help doctors find more precise answers to unusual or uncommon ailments and then more effectively administer care. The hivemind is simply astonishing, especially when it’s comprised of trained doctors!

 


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Mobile Applications for Diabetes Self-Management: Status and Potential

Mobile Applications for Diabetes Self-Management: Status and Potential | mHealth | Scoop.it

Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, Vol. 7, Issue 1 Jan. 2013.

El-Gayar, Timsina and Nawar.

 

ABSTRACT

Background:
Advancements in smartphone technology coupled with the proliferation of data connectivity has resulted in increased interest and unprecedented growth in mobile applications for diabetes self-management. The objective of this article is to determine, in a systematic review, whether diabetes applications have been helping patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes self-manage their condition and to identify issues necessary for large-scale adoption of such interventions.
Methods:
The review covers commercial applications available on the Apple App Store (as a representative of commercially available applications) and articles published in relevant databases covering a period fromJanuary 1995 to August 2012. The review included all applications supporting any diabetes self-management task where the patient is the primary actor.
Results:
Available applications support self-management tasks such as physical exercise, insulin dosage or medication, blood glucose testing, and diet. Other support tasks considered include decision support, notification/alert, tagging of input data, and integration with social media. The review points to the potential for mobile applications to have a positive impact on diabetes self-management. Analysis indicates that application usage is associated with improved attitudes favorable to diabetes self-management. Limitations of the applications include lack of personalized feedback; usability issues, particularly the ease of data entry; and integration with patients and electronic health records.
Conclusions:
Research into the adoption and use of user-centered and sociotechnical design principles is needed to improve usability, perceived usefulness, and, ultimately, adoption of the technology. Proliferation and efficacy of interventions involving mobile applications will benefit from a holistic approach that takes into account patients’ expectations and providers’ needs.


J Diabetes Sci Technol 2013;7(1):247–262    


Via rob halkes, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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rob halkes's curator insight, August 29, 2014 10:29 AM

There is good perspective to mobile health (ehealth) applications to self management in diabetes. However, as this research review suggests: we need to know more about use and socio technological influences. As I repeat myself: ehealth mhealth is NOT about technology: it is about implementation. Let's go for that!

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Mobile Health Market to Reach $58.8 Billion Globally by 2020

Mobile Health Market to Reach $58.8 Billion Globally by 2020 | mHealth | Scoop.it
With growing per capita healthcare expenditure, the m-health market is further projected to reach $58.8 billion by 2020.

Via eMedToday
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