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Worst practice in ICT use in education

Worst practice in ICT use in education | technologies of language learning | Scoop.it

"Here's a list of some of what I consider to be the preeminent 'worst practices' related to the large scale use of ICTs in education in developing countries, based on first hand observation over the past dozen or so years.  I have omitted names (please feel free to fill them in yourself) ..."

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Via Miloš Bajčetić, Leona Ungerer
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10 principles to consider when introducing ICTs into remote, low-income educational environments

10 principles to consider when introducing ICTs into remote, low-income educational environments | technologies of language learning | Scoop.it
there must be an I, a C, and a T here somewhere ... There are, broadly speaking, two strands of concurrent thinking that dominate discussions around the use of new technologies in education around the world. At one end of the continuum, talk is dominated by words like 'transformation'. The (excellent) National Education Technology Plan of the United States (Transforming American Education: Learning Powered by Technology), for example, calls for "applying the advanced technologies used in our daily personal and professional lives to our entire education system to improve student learning, accelerate and scale up the adoption of effective practices, and use data and information for continuous improvement." This is, if you will, a largely 'developed' country sort of discourse, where new technologies and approaches are layered upon older approaches and technologies in systems that largely 'work', at least from a global perspective. While the citizens of such countries may talk about a 'crisis' in their education systems (and may indeed have been talking about such a crisis for more than a generation), citizens of many other, much 'less developed' countries would happily switch places.   If you want to see a true crisis in education, come have a look at our schools, they might (and do!) say, or at least the remote ones where a young teacher in an isolated village who has only received a tenth grade education tries to teach 60+ children in a dilapitated, multigrade classroom where books are scarce and many of the students (and even more of their parents) are often functionally illiterate. Like so many things in life, it all depends on your perspective. One country's education crisis situation may be (for better or for worse) another country's aspiration. While talk in some places may be about how new technologies can help transform education, in other places it is about how such tools can help education systems function at a basic level. The potential uses of information and communication technologies -- ICTs -- are increasingly part of considerations around education planning in both sorts of places. One challenge for educational policymakers and planners in the remote, low income scenario is that most models (and expertise, and research) related to ICT use come from high-income contexts and environments (typically urban, or at least peri-urban). One consequence is that technology-enabled 'solutions' are imported and (sort of) 'made to fit' into more challenging environments. When they don't work, this is taken as 'evidence' that ICT use in education in such places is irrelevant (and some folks go so far to state that related discussions are irresponsible as a result). There is, thankfully, some emerging thinking coalescing around various types of principles and approaches that may be useful to help guide the planning and implementation of ICT in education initiatives in such environments. As part of my duties at the World Bank, I have been discussing a set of such principles and approaches with a number of groups recently, and thought I'd share them here, in case they might be of wider interest or utility to anyone else. Are they universally applicable or relevant? Probably not. But the hope is that they might be useful to organizations considering using ICTs in the education sector in very challenging environments -- especially where introducing these principles and approaches into planning discussions may cause such groups to challenge assumptions and conventional wisdom about what 'works', and how best to proceed.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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E-Learning in Higher Education in Latin America

E-Learning in Higher Education in Latin America | technologies of language learning | Scoop.it
This report analyses the incorporation of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in higher education in Latin America, focusing mainly on what is commonly referred to as “e-learning”.

Via Nik Peachey
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Nik Peachey's curator insight, July 2, 2015 3:45 AM

Really useful reading for anyone working with students in Latin America.

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Surveying ICT use in education in Africa

Surveying ICT use in education in Africa | technologies of language learning | Scoop.it
I have a better sense of where things are today, but the more important question is: Where are things headed? I began my career exploring the uses of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in education in Ghana, Uganda and a number of other places in Africa in the late 1990s, and have continued to stay engaged with lots of passionate and innovative groups and people working with ICTs in various ways to help meet a variety of challenges related to education across the continent. Because of this history, and continued connections to lots of folks doing related cool stuff, I am from time to time asked: "So, what's happening with technology use in education in Africa these days?" Periodically one comes across press reports asking general questions of this sort, such as this one from Germany's Deutsche Welle news service: Can tech help solve some of Africa's education problems? Of course, 'Africa' is a rather large place. Related generalizations (while catnip for headline writers, especially those outside the continent) obviously can obscure as much as they illuminate, perpetuating certain stereotypes of Africa as a single, monolithic place with certain common characteristics.(Binyavanga Wainaina's satirical How To Write About Africa remains sadly spot on in too many instances.) That said, while the impulse from some corners to refer to 'Africa' may be both unfortunate but nevertheless predictable, being asked this sort of question at least provides an opportunity to unpack this question in ways that are (hopefully) useful and interesting. The EduTech blog was conceived in part, and in a decidedly modest way, to help direct the gaze of some folks to some of the interesting questions and challenges being addressed in different ways in different communities in Africa related to ICT use in education by groups who are, along the way, coming up with some interesting answers and solutions. --- The UNESCO Institute for Statistics (UIS), the arm of the United Nations charged with collecting global data related to education (and some other sectors as well), recently came out with a report that provides some useful data that collectively can help outline the general shape of some of what is happening across the African continent when it comes to the availability and use of educational technologies. Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in Education in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Comparative Analysis of Basic e-Readiness in Schools is certainly not the first such report that has taken a continent-wide perspective, but it is notable in a number of regards -- not only because it is the most recent such effort, but also because it is intended as a precursor to more regular data, systematic data collection efforts going forward. Written by Peter Wallet (with the assistance of Beatriz Valdes Melgar), the report presents data and related analysis from a survey co-sponsored by UIS, the Korea Education and Research Information Service (KERIS) and the Brazilian Regional Center for Studies on the Development of the Information Society (CETIC.br -- the group responsible for the annual Survey of ICT and Education in Brazil). The report notes that, unfortunately, "data on ICT in education in the region are sparse. Collecting more and better quality statistics will be a priority in the post-2015 development agenda given the growing role of ICT in education. In response, the UIS is working with countries to establish appropriate mechanisms to process and report data, and to better measure the impact of technology on the quality of education." With that caveat and announcement out of the way, the report then utilizes the UIS Guide to Measuring Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) in Education as a framework with which to examine what could be discovered about the existence of related national policies, data about learner-computer ratios, school electrification and connectivity, and ICT-related instruction and curricula in ways consistent with other regional reports that the UIS has published on Asia, Latin America and a number of Arab countries. (Here's a list of international surveys of this sort from UIS and others for anyone who might be interested, as well as some general information about efforts of this sort.) Some selected highlights:

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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ICTs in Education for People with Disabilities - Review of Innovative Practice

ICTs in Education for People with Disabilities - Review of Innovative Practice | technologies of language learning | Scoop.it

In 2010, the UNESCO Institute for Information Technologies in Education (UNESCO IITE) and the European Agency for Development in Special Needs Education agreed to collaborate on a joint project to develop a Review of Innovative Practice – a report presenting concrete examples of practice of the use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) with people with disabilities in different educational contexts and settings. In particular, the Review was targeted at considering examples of practice that can be considered to be ‘innovative’ within the specific educational setting and wider societal context they were situated within.

 


Via Nik Peachey
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Nik Peachey's curator insight, May 21, 2013 12:10 PM

You can download both the full report and and executive summary in PDF forma from here.

Milena Charris's curator insight, March 2, 2016 4:26 AM

En este articulo se menciona la relacion de las TIC con la educacion en Europa-UNESCO

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Will technology replace teachers? No, but ...

Will technology replace teachers? No, but ... | technologies of language learning | Scoop.it
In the future, will a machine replace me and smash other machines on my behalf? I've worked on, advised and evaluated educational technology projects in dozens of countries over the past fifteen years, mainly in middle and low income countries. As anyone who works intimately with information and communication technologies (ICTs) on a daily basis knows, change is a constant when working in the technology sector. (In contrast, while rhetoric about change is a constant in the education sector, change itself is much slower in coming ....) While the technologies themselves may change quite often, though, many of the most common questions related to their introduction and use remain largely the same. --- I remember working with teachers in Ghana in the late 1990s as part of a pilot initiative to introduce computers and the Internet into a select number of schools in a few of the major cities. Towards the end of the third day of a five day workshop, we had a teacher show up at the door to our classroom, apologizing for his tardiness and asking if he could join the course. He explained that he had traveled for a few days to reach the small school outside Accra where out training activity was taking place, hitching rides on trucks and then transferring between long haul buses, because he had heard about this thing called the Internet that was going to "change education forever" and just had to see it for himself. Given how many people had wanted to take the course, we had a strict policy not to allow latecomers into the workshop, but we waived it for this gentlemen, because we were so taken by his story and by the hardship he had endured to join us. We waived the policy for another reason as well. It is decidedly not politically correct to say so, but we also allowed this teacher into the class because he was ... old. He claimed to be over 70, but said he wasn't exactly sure of his exact birthdate, other than that it had occurred on a Friday. While my Ghanaian colleagues expressed some skepticism that this fellow was actually as old as he claimed, there was no doubt that he was decades older than any of us in the room. He was an English teacher, he said, noting that he had heard that it was possible to get access to all of Shakespeare's plays on the Internet, for free, and wanted to see how this was possible. A computer became available (the teachers using it had been frustrated that poor bandwidth kept interrupting their CU-SeeMe session and so decided to return to the dormitory before dinner), so we sat down, fired up Alta Vista, and typed in

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Research questions about technology use in education in developing countries

Research questions about technology use in education in developing countries | technologies of language learning | Scoop.it
let's investigate this systematically ... Back in 2005, I helped put together a 'quick guide to ICT and education challenges and research questions' in developing countries. This list was meant to inform a research program at the time sponsored by the World Bank's infoDev program, but I figured I'd make it public, because the barriers to publishing were so low (copy -> paste -> save -> upload) and in case doing so might be useful to anyone else. While I don't know to what extent others may have actually found this list helpful, I have seen this document referenced over the years in various funding proposals, and by other funding agencies. Over the past week I've (rather surprisingly) heard two separate organizations reference this rather old document in the course of considering some of their research priorities going forward related to investigating possible uses of information and communication technologies (ICTs) to help meet educational goals in low income and middle countries around the world, and so I wondered how these 50 research questions had held up over the years. Are they still relevant? And: What did we miss, ignore or not understand? The list of research questions to be investigated going forward was a sort of companion document to Knowledge maps: What we know (and what we don't) about ICT use in education in developing countries. It was in many ways a creature of its time and context. The formulation of the research questions identified was in part influenced by some stated interests of the European Commission (which was co-funding some of the work) and I knew that some research questions would resonate with other potential funders at the time (including the World Bank itself) who were interested in related areas (see, for example, the first and last research questions). The list of research questions was thus somewhat idiosynscratic, did not presume to be comprehensive in its treatment of the topic, and was not intended nor meant to imply that certain areas of research interest were 'more important' than others not included on the list. That said, in general the list seems to have held up quite well, and many of the research questions from 2005 continue to resonate in 2015. In some ways, this resonance is unfortunate, as it suggests that we still don't know answers to a lot of very basic questions. Indeed, in some cases we may know as little in 2015 as we knew in 2015, despite the explosion of activity and investment (and rhetoric) in exploring the relevance of technology use in education to help meet a wide variety of challenges faced by education systems, communities, teachers and learners around the world. This is not to imply that we haven't learned anything, of course (an upcoming EduTech blog post will look at two very useful surveys of research findings that have been published in the past year), but that we still have a long way to go. Some comments and observations, with the benefit of hindsight and when looking forward The full list of research questions from 2005 is copied at the bottom of this blog post (here's the original list as published, with explanation and commentary on individual items). Reviewing this list, a few things jump out at me:

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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ICT-based Collaborative Learning and Innovative Pedagogy

ICT-based Collaborative Learning and Innovative Pedagogy | technologies of language learning | Scoop.it
Much of what has been designed and developed for modern day multimedia computer supported collaborative learning (MM‑CSCL) is based either on the possibilities that information and communication technologies (ICTs) afford for CSCL and CSCL environments or on a variety of educational and/or on various general and specific pedagogical principles that practitioners attempt to apply in those MM environments. The problem with these two approaches is that CSCL is often not very effective (i.e., students often do not learn what was planned and/or do not really collaborate with each other), and/or not very efficient (i.e., learning what was intended takes more time and more effort that either learning alone and/or takes more than the time that was allotted/planned), and/or not really enjoyable (i.e., learners have the idea that they are just “going through the paces” and would prefer to work alone).

Via Carlos Fosca
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Carlos Fosca's curator insight, May 1, 2016 10:16 AM

De acuerdo a Paul A. Kirschner, professor of Educational Psychology and Programme Director of the "Fostering Effective, Efficient and Enjoyable Learning" environments (FEEEL) programme at the Open University of the Netherlands,  para que verdaderamente se logren aprendizajes colaborativos es necesario que se cumplan tres condiciones o principios: 1) Las metas de aprendizaje deben ser lo suficientemente complejas como para requerir colaboración y para impulsar el desarrollo de una memoria de trabajo colectiva (osea que el aprendizaje no sea posible de ser alcanzado en las condiciones planteadas por el esfuerzo de un solo individuo). 2) que los procesos cognitivos y la información necesaria para el aprendizaje sea efectiva y eficientemente compartida por todos los miembros del grupo (osea que no haya quienes se queden con más información que el resto)  y 3) que el ambiente multimedia provea de las herramientas necesarias para que se genere una comunicación efectiva alrededor del contenido académico y una coordinación y regulación que haga posible alcanzar las metas de aprendizaje reduciendo significativamente los costos de las actividades transaccionales (osea que todos sientan que el trabajar en grupo de manera colaborativa valió la pena y no haya “hormigas” y “cigarras” en el equipo)