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Digital Inclusion 'Imperative' for American Education - T.H.E. Journal

Digital Inclusion 'Imperative' for American Education - T.H.E. Journal | TechTastic | Scoop.it
Digital Inclusion 'Imperative' for American Education
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Ten educational technologies you should try this year | eSchool News

It's always hard to predict what technology will be a game-changer, but here are 10 educational technologies that have sparked our interest in recent months.
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Rescooped by Kristin Oostra from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
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Bill Gates - We Aren't Doing Enough to Spur the Advance of Education Technology

Bill Gates - We Aren't Doing Enough to Spur the Advance of Education Technology | TechTastic | Scoop.it
Edtech -- shorthand for broadband-powered education technology -- holds the potential to transform learning from a classroom-bound process, whereby groups of students are taught by a single teacher at any given time, to a rich, personalized...

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Rescooped by Kristin Oostra from Educational Technology News
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Then and Now: Education Technology in 1963 vs 2013

Then and Now: Education Technology in 1963 vs 2013 | TechTastic | Scoop.it

"John F. Kennedy made a strong push for education reform focused on science and technology during his presidency. His enthusiasm for STEM education was fueled, in part, by the Soviet Union’s 1957 launch of Sputnik. When Lyndon B. Johnson was sworn in hours after Kennedy’s death he maintained the momentum behind Kennedy's mission to boost the government’s support of STEM education. Nine presidents later, the United States is in the midst of a new “Sputnik Moment” sparked by the country’s low global rankings in math and science. As of 2012, American students rank 31st in mathematics and 23rd in science."


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Denver Leigh Watson, M.Ed, LDTC's curator insight, March 14, 2013 5:09 PM

Thought provoking! 

Alexander Daron's curator insight, October 15, 2017 11:16 AM

I chose this resource because it is interesting to me how much our educational systems have changed since the 1960's. Math and Science are still a huge focus of our educational system, but the way that the material and information is delivered is like night and day. In 2017, we are looking at ways to implement more STEM programs similar to what the U.S. did in the 1960's following the launching of Sputnik. I hope that this article will show our educators how much we have grown over the last 50 years. Along with this, we should know that our basic principles have stayed the same. If teachers attempt to try to teach like the 1960's though, their tactics are outdated, and need to attempt more technology into their classrooms.