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Practical ways & useful ideas in utilizing information technology to solve challenging business problems
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5 Reasons NYC is the New Technology Capital of the World

5 Reasons NYC is the New Technology Capital of the World | Powering Your Enterprise | Scoop.it
I was born in Manhattan, grew up in Brooklyn, and except for a stint in Boston and a much shorter stint in Acapulco, I’ve always lived and worked in New York. So I’ll be the first person
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Advice for US Entrepreneurs Who Move to Europe

Advice for US Entrepreneurs Who Move to Europe | Powering Your Enterprise | Scoop.it
While not all Americans love Europe, many do. Quite a few people in San Francisco or New York City dream of spending part of their life in Italy, France, the UK, Spain and other European countries,
Chris Chan's insight:

While not all Americans love Europe, many do. Quite a few people in San Francisco or New York City dream of spending part of their life in Italy, France, the UK, Spain and other European countries, and some do make it over. This is what I did in 1995 when I left NYC and moved to Madrid. As a tech entrepreneur, I found Europe, in general, and Spain, in particular, to be very fertile ground for me. The European market is huge, bigger actually than the US market in terms of GDP. This has not changed with the crisis. While in Europe, I built Viatel: a company that I started in NYC, but later on moved to London and in which I invested a few hundred thousand dollars to start in 1991. When I sold my shares in a public offering in 1999 the company was worth $1.2bn. In Madrid, I built Jazztel: Spain’s second largest publicly traded telco (now worth around $1.8bn), and Ya.com, in which we invested around $50M and sold for $700M to DT. I also co-founded Eolia Renovables, an alternative energy company now worth around half a billion. And for the last six years I have been building Fon out of Madrid and London and it’s become the largest WiFi network in the world, still private. I also started one of the first European cloud computing companies called Einsteinet where I lost about $50M mostly for being too early in the cloud-computing world.

 

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Why Amazon and Salesforce are pulling away from the cloud pack

Why Amazon and Salesforce are pulling away from the cloud pack | Powering Your Enterprise | Scoop.it
In early 2011, I wrote a blog post about who I thought would be dominant cloud computing players 10 years from then. In that post, I argued that the breadth of offerings from Microsoft and Google put them in position to own large parts of future IT markets. But much has changed since then. I think two cloud providers — Amazon Web Services and Salesofrce.com — have begun to pull away from the pack, and I’m ready to admit I didn’t give these two companies their due.

 

To understand why are they beginning to lap the field, it is important to understand what has been successful in cloud computing to date, and what hasn’t been successful (or at least not yet).

 

Continue: http://gigaom.com/cloud/why-amazon-and-salesforce-are-pulling-away-from-the-cloud-pack/

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IT: Becoming less about tech skills, more about integration | TechRepublic

IT: Becoming less about tech skills, more about integration | TechRepublic | Powering Your Enterprise | Scoop.it
Patrick Gray talks about a seismic shift going on in IT where knowledgeable technicians no longer rule the roost.

 

It’s an amazing time to be in the IT industry, as we’re witnessing a seismic shift the likes of which rival the move to connected computing inspired by the Internet in the late 1990s. While the Internet had near-universal appeal to IT workers, this next shift has raised some eyebrows.

 

Increasingly, working in IT is becoming less about technical skills and more about integration. Whereas in decades past your key players in most IT departments were the exceptional developers, key roles are increasingly filled by those who can best integrate readily available components. Even software development has moved in this direction, with the most capable developers being the ones who can creatively write the “glue” that leverages existing libraries, connects to external services, and delivers a new experience in weeks that would take months or years to develop from scratch.

 

Arguably, this is the direction in which computing has been going for years, from the first shared libraries and software development toolkits. However, we’ve only recently shifted from the days of proprietary and costly libraries to open APIs, with a breadth and depth that would have been unfathomable a decade ago. On the software development front, anyone with an internet connection and web browser can tap into everything from freely available open-source development environments to cloud-based storage and processing power that offers more capability and capacity than most Fortune 500 IT environments. Each new application that leverages these tools seems to adopt the philosophy of the major cloud providers, offering low-cost APIs that further the innovation cycle by allowing a new tool to tap into each subsequent technical evolution.

 

Continue reading: http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/tech-manager/it-becoming-less-about-tech-skills-more-about-integration/7886?tag=nl.e550

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Innovation Is a Discipline, Not a Cliché

Innovation Is a Discipline, Not a Cliché | Powering Your Enterprise | Scoop.it
You can set your watch to it. About every six months an article appears arguing that innovation is an overused term, with corporate fatigue auguring a "back to basics" approach focused on less sexy but important tasks of execution, strategy, and so on.

 

The latest salvo was a much discussed Wall Street Journal article carrying the provocative title, "You Call That Innovation?" The article had choice lines such as "like the once ubiquitous buzzwords 'synergy' and 'optimization,' innovation is in danger of becoming a cliché — if it isn't one already." (In a related HBR post, Bill Taylor shares his thoughts on the same WSJ article, and why he believes it deserves serious consideration.)

 

No doubt the term innovation is bankrupt at some companies, particularly those that throw the word around without defining it clearly. The Little Black Book of Innovation offers a simple, five-word definition: "Something different that has impact." This intentionally broad definition helps to disarm three common misconceptions.

 

Continue: http://blogs.hbr.org/anthony/2012/05/four_innovation_misconceptions.html?awid=8970458363217328109-3271

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Tech managers aren't doing a good job developing IT talent: survey

Tech managers aren't doing a good job developing IT talent: survey | Powering Your Enterprise | Scoop.it
The IT careers site asked about the relationship between managers and their tech staff, and unsurprisingly, most poll-takers rated it a very important (59%) or somewhat important (23%) factor in the decision to stay at their current firm or look for a new job. Just 6% said the manager-staff relationship isn't an important factor in the decision to stay at a job, and another 6% went a step further and said it's not a factor at all. (The remaining 6% of respondents are either between jobs or are the boss.)

 

In addition to influencing an employee's job search decisions, an IT boss has the power to influence a company's reputation and its ability to recruit tech talent, says Tom Silver, senior vice president, North America, at Dice. "Yet, when it comes to developing talent, tech managers are not making the grade," Silver noted in a report released this month.

 

A majority of IT professionals judge their current managers as graders (61%) versus teachers (26%), but it's more important to create a nurturing workplace than a pass/fail department, Silver said.

"There will always be a need for some grading, but the emphasis should be on teaching. Tech professionals do their best work when it's a safe environment to try new solutions, explore alternatives and fail," Silver said. "Over time, wisdom gained equals fewer mistakes, cutting quickly to the best solution and increasing production. That's a pretty good payback."

 

If tech employees don't feel valued, they're going to jump ship. Turnover has fallen below average for 41 months in a row, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, but tech managers can't count on a struggling economy and tight job market to keep their departments staffed. Good talent will flee, Silver says.

 

"Frankly, companies haven't felt the repercussions of subpar workplaces in the last three years. But, the gap between the importance of the employee-manager relationship and the way it's developing is unacceptable. Both sides need to remember this is a lasting connection and one worth the effort."

 

As of May 1, Dice.com lists 84,911 available tech jobs on its site. The top tech metro areas, based on the number of open jobs compared to a year ago, are: New York/New Jersey (9,005 jobs, up 1%), Washington, D.C./Baltimore (8,063 jobs, up 10%), Silicon Valley (5,620 jobs, up 21%), Chicago (3,731 jobs, up 10%), Boston (3,290 jobs, up 15%), Los Angeles (3,267 jobs, up 5%), Dallas (3,237 jobs, up 24%), Atlanta (3,196 jobs, up 17%), Seattle (2,993 jobs, up 23%) and Philadelphia (2,379 jobs, up 7%).

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Apple by the Numbers [INFOGRAPHIC]

Apple by the Numbers [INFOGRAPHIC] | Powering Your Enterprise | Scoop.it
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How Mobile is Rapidly Evolving the World - Forbes

How Mobile is Rapidly Evolving the World - Forbes | Powering Your Enterprise | Scoop.it
The first time I can remember realizing how critical mobile phones were to people was back in 2006, while I was working in India. It was a blistering summer, and I’d heard the news that rural farmers were waiting in mile long lines to bring their produce to market; most had to spend the night catching what sleep they could on their bullock carts. Sadly, the heat of the summer spoiled nearly all the produce that didn’t make it to market that week, and many farmers were distraught.

 

A few farmers, I later learned, used their mobile phones to find out about prices and wait times at different markets. Armed with that information, they sold their produce in the markets that had the shortest lines and highest prices. They had, in fact, saved their produce and their financial livelihood from certain ruin.

 

Situations like this one highlight crucial progress occurring in some of the most remote places on earth. Where people living in the most disadvantaged societies are utilizing 21st century mobile technologies to help solve problems that have been around since the 19th century – a period of 200 years bridged by a single device carried in your pocket.

 

So if mobile technologies are evolving the least advanced societies, imagine what they’re going to do the world’s most advanced.

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GM Says Facebook Ads Don't Work, Pulls $10 Million Account - Forbes

GM Says Facebook Ads Don't Work, Pulls $10 Million Account - Forbes | Powering Your Enterprise | Scoop.it
Just days before Facebook’s historic stock offering, General Motors said it plans to stop advertising on the social media site, concluding that its paid ads don’t have a big impact on consumers.

 

GM spends about $40 million a year on Facebook marketing, according to the Wall Street Journal, about $10 million of which is for paid advertisements. It will continue to post relevant content about the company and its brands on GM’s Facebook pages.

 

GM marketing chief Joel Ewanick told the Journal that GM “is definitely reassessing our advertising on Facebook, although the content is effective and important.”

 

Continue: http://www.forbes.com/sites/joannmuller/2012/05/15/gm-says-facebook-ads-dont-work-pulls-10-million-account/

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Doodling for Dollars

Doodling for Dollars | Powering Your Enterprise | Scoop.it
Employees in a range of businesses are being encouraged by their companies to sketch their ideas and draw diagrams to explain complicated concepts to colleagues.

 

While whiteboards long have been staples in conference rooms, companies such as Facebook Inc. are incorporating whiteboards, chalkboards and writable glass on all sorts of surfaces to spark creativity.

 

Firms are holding training sessions to teach employees the basics of what's known as visual note taking. Others, like vacation-rental company HomeAway Inc. and retailer Zappos, are hiring graphic recorders, consultants who sketch what is discussed at meetings and conferences, cartoon-style, to keep employees engaged.

 

Doodling proponents say it can help generate ideas, fuel collaboration and simplify communication. It can be especially helpful among global colleagues who don't share a common first language. Putting pen to paper also is seen as an antidote to the pervasiveness of digital culture, getting workers to look up from their devices. And studies show it can help workers retain more information.

 

Even with advanced gadgets such as smartphones and tablets, "the hand is the easiest way to get something down," says Everett Katigbak, a communication designer at Facebook. Most of the walls at the company's offices around the country have been coated with dry-erase or chalkboard paint or a treatment for glass to allow employees to sketch ideas whenever they arise. The company's offices are filled with jottings, from mathematical equations to doodles of cats and dollar signs.

IdeaPaint Inc., which makes a paint that turns a surface into a whiteboard, says its sales have doubled annually since the product was introduced in 2008. The Ashland, Mass., company says more than half of its business is in the workplace.

Taking notes and drawing may help workers stay more focused, too.

 

A 2009 study published in the journal Applied Cognitive Psychology found that doodlers retained more than nondoodlers when remembering information that had been presented in a boring context, such as a meeting or conference call. The logic, according to Jackie Andrade, a psychology professor at the University of Plymouth in England, is that doodling takes up just enough cognitive energy to prevent the mind from daydreaming.

 

Continue: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052702303978104577362402264009714.html

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ERP makes a comeback

ERP makes a comeback | Powering Your Enterprise | Scoop.it
They couldn't put it off any longer. The ERP system for the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) had reached the end of its useful life.

 

No wonder. EPRI -- a California nonprofit institute that conducts research on the generation, distribution, and use of electricity for utilities in the United States and abroad -- had implemented its ERP system way back in 1999. Driven in part by the race to beat the Y2K deadline, the system had been designed for a time when EPRI used a combination of mainframes, minicomputers, client server systems, and desktop PCs -- an architecture it abandoned years ago. Worse, the organization's original ERP vendor had been swallowed by a competitor, and support for its legacy product was coming to an end.

 

It was time to make a painful choice. But unlike in the late 1990s, EPRI had plenty of options. It could stay with a large on-premise vendor like Oracle or SAP. It could go for a smaller but nimbler SaaS solution like NetSuite or Plex Online. Or it could go for an on-premise solution hosted and managed by a third party.

 

EPRI chose the last, going with a brand-name solution and a third-party host. Why?

"Their solution offered a contract lifecycle management module, which we needed," says Michael Dotson, senior manager of business operations for EPRI. "And the hosting company had more experience with the software. We thought it would be faster to roll out and easier to upgrade, especially if we needed to customize it later."

 

Continue: http://www.infoworld.com/d/applications/erp-makes-comeback-181878?goback=%2Egna_51826

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Google Drive detailed: 5 GB for free, launching next week for Mac, Windows, Android and iOS

Google Drive detailed: 5 GB for free, launching next week for Mac, Windows, Android and iOS | Powering Your Enterprise | Scoop.it
Sometimes we get lucky, and today is one of those days. I got a draft release from a partner of Google’s upcoming Google Drive service and it gives away a wealth of information about how Google plans to take on the incumbent Dropbox. The short story? 5 GB of storage, and it launches next week, likely on Tuesday at http://drive.google.com

 

Now let’s talk details. It’s no surprise that it will roll out for free. What’s interesting though is that Google is planning to start everyone with 5 GB of storage. Of course you can buy more, but that trumps Dropbox’s 2 GB that is included with every account. Dropbox does make it easy to get more space, including 23 GB of potential upgrades for HTC users.

 

What’s also interesting is the wording related to how the system will work. It’s been long-thought that Windows integration will come easy, but that getting the Google Drive icon into the Mac a la Dropbox would be a bit harder. From what we’re reading, Google Drive will work “in desktop folders” on both Mac and Windows machines, which still leaves the operation question unanswered.

 

Continue: http://thenextweb.com/google/2012/04/16/google-drive-detailed-5-gb-for-free-launching-next-week-for-mac-windows-android-and-ios/

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The Social Media Statistics Of Fortune 500 Companies [INFOGRAPHIC] - AllTwitter

The Social Media Statistics Of Fortune 500 Companies [INFOGRAPHIC] - AllTwitter | Powering Your Enterprise | Scoop.it
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IT Departments Have Become Completely Useless

IT Departments Have Become Completely Useless | Powering Your Enterprise | Scoop.it
They've lost the knowledge advantage. ;
Chris Chan's insight:

In an increasingly digital age where everyone is somewhat tech savvy, IT departments are becoming less and less relevant.  This is not to say it is irrelevant as companies still rely on IT personnel to mange technology infrastructure.  However, the role of CIO or CTO are not as important as before.

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A guide to Europe’s tech hubs

A guide to Europe’s tech hubs | Powering Your Enterprise | Scoop.it

Europe may not have the go-for-it startup ethos that characterizes Silicon Valley but there are still a dozen or so pockets of  high-energy, high-tech expertise on the continent.  From London’s expanding Tech City to the more bucolic Silicon Glen, and from Tallinn, Estonia, to Berlin, here’s our guide to European’s hottest tech hubs (listed in alphabetical order).

 

Continue reading: http://www.washingtonpost.com/business/technology/a-guide-to-europes-tech-hubs/2012/10/16/c1cf05be-16f6-11e2-a346-f24efc680b8d_story.html

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Which U.S. Tech Giant Is Growing Fastest in 2012?

Which U.S. Tech Giant Is Growing Fastest in 2012? | Powering Your Enterprise | Scoop.it
Which public U.S. tech giant has grown by the largest clip over the last six months?

Via Efraim Silver
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Cloud putting crimp in traditional software, hardware sales

Cloud putting crimp in traditional software, hardware sales | Powering Your Enterprise | Scoop.it
Enterprise spending on cloud computing growing at a faster rate than overall IT spending will pose a challenge to legacy hardware and software vendors, Gartner cloud forecaster Ed Anderson says.

 

Cloud computing is expected to grow 19% in 2012, becoming a $109 billion industry compared to a $91 billion market last year. By 2016, it's expected to be a $207 billion industry, according to Anderson's latest findings. That compares to the 3% growth expected in the overall global IT market. While it's true that the $109 billion cloud market represents just a 3% chunk of the overall $3.6 trillion spent on IT globally, Anderson says it's still responsible, in part, for a slowdown in growth for traditional on-premise hardware and software sales.

 

Software delivery is shifting from a traditional license sale to install an application on-premise, to a per-user cloud-based software-as-a-services (SaaS) model. Meanwhile, hardware is shifting from on-premise capital expenditures to off-premise operational expenditures.

In the long term, Anderson says, the cloud model will create new IT spending opportunities. Integration, customization, hybrid cloud and on-premise cloud installations will all grow in significance as cloud adoption continues. "There will be some short-term decline, but in the long term, it will level out," he says.

 

Continue reading: http://www.networkworld.com/news/2012/071312-gartner-cloud-260882.html?page=1

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Inova Software: Structuring business development to align with strategy « partneringNEWS

Inova Software: Structuring business development to align with strategy « partneringNEWS | Powering Your Enterprise | Scoop.it

No one knows where the next innovation will come from, but business development executives need to know how to manage it once it arrives.

 

It is possible, we have the technology. And adding an internal capability to be both fast and nimble in capturing external opportunities is mission-critical for pharmaceutical companies.

 

Six of the top 10 pharma companies are applying a structured, sustained and repeatable process in their hunt for new and novel assets that aligns their approach from scouting through to licensing and even beyond to include alliance management.

 

The framework for this end-to-end solution is built by Inova Software, which last year merged with Vertical*i to bring together two platforms, one for innovation process management and the other for partnering.

 

The combined capabilities led to a record year for the young company that reported organic growth of 50 percent and added prestigious customers to its user group.

 

Driving this growth is a massive strategic shift by pharma to acquire assets externally and develop partnerships, according to Hansruedi Kottmann, Chairman and President at Inova Software.

 

“Innovation has become very fluid in the pharma sector,” he said. “Where in the past innovation was an internal play within vertically integrated companies, the business development and licensing function within pharma has become a very strategic sourcing arm.”

 

At first acquiring assets externally was a stop-gap measure to rapidly fill pipelines. But progressively this external approach to innovation became a strategic priority, “to the point that today we see some pharma companies with 50 percent of their future drugs coming from the outside,” he said.

Yet pharma companies struggle to align their organization with this strategy.

 

Inova’s Senior VP of Business Development, Guy Henninger, recently described one large pharma company with an IT infrastructure that consisted of 21 different business development systems with very little if any coordination between them.

 

Continue: http://ebdgroup.com/partneringnews/2012/04/inova-software-structuring-business-development-to-align-with-strategy/

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CEOs, CIOs Favor Big Data Over Social Software

CEOs, CIOs Favor Big Data Over Social Software | Powering Your Enterprise | Scoop.it
With hype over Facebook’s IPO sparkling and fading, senior executives say Big Data is a greater priority than social software for their businesses, according to a new study from McKinsey & Company. Roughly 49% of those surveyed said they are currently using Big Data to understand their customers better, while a combined 32% said they are currently using social media to interact with customers or promote their brands.

 

To collect its data, McKinsey surveyed 1,500 CEOs, CFOs and CIOs between April 3 and April 12. Report authors Johnson Sikes, a McKinsey technology strategy consultant, and McKinsey director Brad Brown, asked respondents about their companies adoption of expectations for Big Data and analytics, social media and digital marketing technologies.

 

Sikes said that Big Data and social software technologies are often used in tandem to improve businesses; companies that connect with consumers via Facebook, Twitter or their own custom-built social software may use Big Data and analytics software to derive insight into their businesses from social media content.

 

Ramon Baez, CIO for global manufacturer Kimberly-Clark, said he is using business analytics software to gain insight into customers, and social software to help understand what consumers are saying about its brands, which include Huggies and Kleenex. Baez agreed the combination of analytics and social software can be powerful, telling CIO Journal this effort “will not only help us become more effective and efficient, it will enable us to drive the top-line with our key customers.”

 

Continue: http://blogs.wsj.com/cio/2012/05/22/ceos-cios-favor-big-data-over-social-software/

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Social media is reinventing how business is done

Social media is reinventing how business is done | Powering Your Enterprise | Scoop.it
Red Robin and other companies are using Facebook-like technology to share information and simply rethink the old way of doing things.

 

The 460-restaurant chain used an internal social network that resembles Facebook to teach its managers everything from the recipes to the best, fastest way to make them. Instead of mailing out spiral-bound books, getting feedback during executives' sporadic store visits and taking six months to act on advice from the trenches, the network's freewheeling discussion and video produced results in days. Red Robin is already kitchen-testing recipe tweaks based on customer feedback — and the four new sandwiches just hit the table April 30.


Facebook's initial public offering Friday — the largest by a technology company — is a watershed moment for the consumer side of the Web, but social networking's real economic impact might be ahead as companies learn how to harness "social business" tools.


Beyond advertising on Facebook or Twitter, companies are using social networks to build teams that solve problems faster, share information better among their employees and partners, bring customer ideas for new product designs to market earlier, and redesign all kinds of corporate software in Facebook's easy-to-learn style.


"At a very basic level, Facebook is the most popular application ever, with a billion people who know how to use it," said Marc Benioff, chief executive of salesforce.com, whose Chatter social-networking tools are used by 150,000 companies. "The ability to access information is much better because it's easier to get to it."


After a slow start, Big Business is embracing social media in a big way. Forrester Research says the sales of software to run corporate social networks will grow 61% a year and be a $6.4 billion business by 2016.

 

Continue: http://www.usatoday.com/money/economy/story/2012-05-14/social-media-economy-companies/55029088/1?goback=%2Egde_82242_member_116295931

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Google CIO Ben Fried Says Cloud Tipping Point Is At Hand

Google CIO Ben Fried Says Cloud Tipping Point Is At Hand | Powering Your Enterprise | Scoop.it
The economics of cloud computing are driving down the cost structure of business so far and so fast that it’s scary, Google CIO Ben Fried says.

 

“It deeply disturbed me … in 2006, 2007 consumer companies were forcing efficiencies on a scale never seen before,” Fried said Thursday during remarks at the Bloomberg Link Enterprise Technology Summit in New York.

 

At the time, Fried was working in the technology group at investment bank Morgan Stanley, where he was a managing director of application infrastructure, in charge of software development, electronic commerce and knowledge worker productivity. In 2008, he left the bank and headed to Google, which was at the heart of the disruption that was emanating from the consumer market and beginning to spread through the business world.

 

Workers, accustomed to using free and simple tools such as Google Apps, Skype, Flickr and iTunes for their personal affairs, now wanted to use those cloud-based software tools at work. And CIOs and other technology executives were beginning to let them, and to experiment themselves with those services.

 

At the same time, enterprise-focused cloud services such as Amazon Web Services were making it possible for startups and other companies to run their businesses at much lower cost.

 

Continue: http://blogs.wsj.com/cio/2012/05/10/google-cio-ben-fried-says-cloud-tipping-point-is-at-hand/

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Content Curators Are The New Superheros Of The Web

Content Curators Are The New Superheros Of The Web | Powering Your Enterprise | Scoop.it

Yesterday, the ever-churning machine that is the Internet pumped out more unfiltered digital data.
Yesterday, 250 million photos were uploaded to Facebook, 864,000 hours of video were uploaded to YouTube, and 294 BILLION emails were sent. And that's not counting all the check-ins, friend requests, Yelp reviews and Amazon posts, and pins on Pintrest.


The volume of information being created is growing faster than your software is able to sort it out. As a result, you're often unable to determine the difference between a fake LinkedIn friend request, and a picture from your best friend in college of his new baby. Even with good metadata, it's still all "data"--whether raw unfiltered, or tagged and sourced, it's all treated like another input to your digital inbox.


What's happened is the web has gotten better at making data. Way better, as it turns out. And while algorithms have gotten better at detecting spam, they aren't keeping up with the massive tide of real-time data.


While devices struggle to separate spam from friends, critical information from nonsense, and signal from noise, the amount of data coming at us is increasingly mind-boggling.
In 2010 we frolicked, Googled, waded, and drowned in 1.2 zettabytes of digital bits and bytes. A year later volume was on an exponential growth curve toward 1.8 zettabytes. (A zettabyte is a trillion gigabytes; that’s a 1 with 21 zeros trailing behind it.)


Which means it's time to enlist the web's secret power--humans.

 

Continue: http://www.fastcompany.com/1834177/content-curators-are-the-new-superheros-of-the-web

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From IT to ET: Cloud, consumerization, and the next wave of IT transformation

From IT to ET: Cloud, consumerization, and the next wave of IT transformation | Powering Your Enterprise | Scoop.it
Businesses, schools, and governments desperately need tech-savvy managers who can innovate quickly, operationalize effectively, and keep their organizations competitive.

 

IT as we know it is over.

 

That's hardly a new observation. It was most notably made in 2003, in a now-famous Harvard Business Review article by pundit Nicholas Carr called "IT Doesn't Matter." The gist of Carr's argument: IT has become a commodity, like electricity. It's no longer a sustainable differentiator (when was the last time you heard a company brag that it did a better job than a competitor because it had "better electricity"?).

 

And, according to Carr, the management of IT is therefore withering into a simple discipline of risk-management and cost-optimization. IT managers should no longer worry about delivering cutting-edge solutions that make their companies more effective — they should stick to the knitting of minimizing costs and risks from services that are increasingly procured as outsourced (utility) services. In other words, IT organizations are effectively on the same level as janitorial services — necessary maintenance, but hardly innovators.

 

On the one hand, the rise in outsourced, hosted, and cloud services would seem to indicate that Carr's correct. Over 90% of IT organizations use some form of managed, hosted, or cloud services.

 

Continue: http://www.networkworld.com/news/2012/042312-consumerization-258458.html

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IBM Fellow Jeff Jonas on the evolution of Big Data

IBM Fellow Jeff Jonas on the evolution of Big Data | Powering Your Enterprise | Scoop.it

Last week I reconnected with Jeff Jonas, chief scientist of the IBM Entity Analytics group and a recently named IBM Fellow, about what's going on in the realm of big data.


When I first met Jonas, back in June of 2010, he was focused on how companies are dealing with the deluge of information associated with Big Data. His focus hasn't changed, but he told me his perspective on how we make sense of data continues to evolve -- especially as we move in and out of demand for real-time versus batch data processing.


New Big Data tools make it much more affordable to gather and organize large sets of data that can be analyzed in its raw form. As advanced analytics applications get applied against that data, it becomes dramatically easier to identify the direct cause-and-effect relationship between business events, regardless of what department is nominally in charge of that event or the process associated with it.


According to Jonas, the three V's -- volume, velocity, and variety -- are the essential characteristics of "Big Data" that will grow exponentially, rather than in a linear fashion. Accordingly, you have to plan for data growth in conjunction with any projects you plan to undertake.

 

Continue: http://news.cnet.com/8301-13846_3-57418387-62/ibm-fellow-jeff-jonas-on-the-evolution-of-big-data/

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Why Open Source Is the Key to Cloud Innovation | PCWorld Business Center

Why Open Source Is the Key to Cloud Innovation | PCWorld Business Center | Powering Your Enterprise | Scoop.it
Free and open source software (FOSS) have become pervasive in computing over the past 25 years.

 

In the 25 years since Richard Stallman wrote the GNU General Public License, free and open source software (FOSS) have become pervasive in computing: Linux, Apache HTTP Server, MySQL and more can be found in large numbers of enterprises across the globe. And open source is now increasingly undergirding cloud computing as well.


"Open source is certainly at the foundation in terms of building out cloud technologies," says Byran Che, senior director of product management at Red Hat and responsible for its cloud operations offerings, management software and Red Hat Enterprise MRG, (Red Hat's Messaging, Real-time and Grid platform). "If you take a look at market share in the server space, as you look at traditional data centers, about 70 percent are running on the Windows platform and about 30 percent are running Linux. As you take a look at what operating systems people are choosing to build applications on in the cloud, the ratio flips completely."

 

The reasoning is simple, Che says: With a fresh start, you get to build a whole new architecture from the ground up, and open source gives you the best value.

 

"You can't get to the Amazon scale or the Google scale and pay the license fees," he says.

Cost isn't the only thing giving the open source model an edge in the cloud space. Che also points to the capability to create a community around a project and thus drive rapid innovation.

 

"That's what open source is really good at," he says. "Amazon, Google, Facebook, all the people building out all these cloud applications, infrastructure and services, they're all doing it on open source. The fact that they're using open source software is the only way they can innovate at the pace they need to. They can't wait for their vendors to go through the development cycle."

 

continue reading: http://www.pcworld.com/businesscenter/article/253790/why_open_source_is_the_key_to_cloud_innovation.html

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