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Computers let students learn at own pace, increase motivation

Computers let students learn at own pace, increase motivation | Technology | Scoop.it
Nova Scotia students desperately need computers. (What do you think: Is learning enhanced by technology? http://t.co/rtUAVSylnm)

Via Yasemin Allsop
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Yasemin Allsop's comment, July 10, 2013 6:39 PM
I think, technology is a great tool for differentiating learning. But it is the teacher who can design a learning space where the children learn at own pace, or collaboratively. It doesn't just happen!
Rescooped by Jacob Issa from 21st Century skills of critical and creative thinking
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Creativity and independence of learning technology information ...

Creativity and independence of learning technology information ... | Technology | Scoop.it

Creativity and independence of learning technology information having regard to the experience of several countries, as noted above, obviously Information Technology and computers have a significant influence on the process and learning ...


Via Ora Baumgarten, Lynnette Van Dyke
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Rescooped by Jacob Issa from Tech, Web 2.0, and the Classroom
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What Teachers Can Learn from Students’ E-learning Likes and Dislikes…

What Teachers Can Learn from Students’ E-learning Likes and Dislikes… | Technology | Scoop.it
By Laura Bates, Fractus Learning
There is sometimes a tendency to assume that all students will love education technology and e-learning – after all, students love computers, the internet, and mobile devices right?

Via David McMullen
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Developing and assessing teaching tools for a techie generation ...

Developing and assessing teaching tools for a techie generation ... | Technology | Scoop.it
Researchers from the LEADS project will use a wide range of technology including video cameras, computers, smartphones, tablets and shared whiteboards to create learning environments where they can assess students as ...

Via David McMullen
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Qualcomm builds learning computer chip inspired by human brain - The Verge

Qualcomm builds learning computer chip inspired by human brain - The Verge | Technology | Scoop.it
Qualcomm builds learning computer chip inspired by human brain
The Verge
Qualcomm learning robot.
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What Teachers Can Learn from Students’ E-learning Likes and Dislikes…

What Teachers Can Learn from Students’ E-learning Likes and Dislikes… | Technology | Scoop.it
There is sometimes a tendency to assume that all students will love education technology and e-learning – after all, students love computers, the internet, and mobile devices right?

Via David McMullen
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Microsoft's New Research Strategy David Talbot - MIT Technology Review

Microsoft's New Research Strategy David Talbot - MIT Technology Review | Technology | Scoop.it
Microsoft's New Research Strategy David Talbot MIT Technology Review Lee took on his new position after running Microsoft Research's flagship lab at the company's headquarters in Redmond, Washington, and was previously head of the computer science...
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No. 4 aha moment: Computers for communication, not as teaching machines

No. 4 aha moment: Computers for communication, not as teaching machines | Technology | Scoop.it

Why is this significant?

 

It comes down to the basic question: can computers replace humans? In particular, can computers replace teachers? This is an on-going issue dating back at least to the 1970s. PLATO was a generalized computer assisted instruction system originally developed at the University of Illinois, and, by the late 1970s, comprised several thousand terminals worldwide on nearly a dozen different networked mainframe computers (Wikipedia). It was in fact a highly successful system, lasting almost 40 years, and incorporated key on-line concepts: forums, message boards, online testing, e-mail, chat rooms, picture languages, instant messaging, remote screen sharing, and multi-player games. The main reason the project was shut down was due to the very high cost of courseware development, although the online communities it created were strong supporters of the concept.

 

PLATO was by far the largest (and most successful) of a multitude of teaching machines developed in the 1970s and later. However, in a paper I wrote in 1986, I compared systems (such as PLATO) based on structured, pre-programmed learning materials where the learner communicates as if with the computer, with systems based on the communications functions of computers that facilitated communication between students and teachers (to be fair to PLATO, there were elements of both within its system). I argued that

 

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How this affects online learning today

 

The development of the World Wide Web transformed information technology-based learning (see next aha moment). Nevertheless, the role of computers and the Internet for communication and learner interaction remains as important as ever. There are really at least three key forms of interaction for a learner:

interaction with media, of which there are two kinds: direct and indirect. Typing in an answer to a computer-based test is direct interaction; thinking about or reflecting on the significance of a narrative in a text is indirect, but nevertheless a critical component of learning. Indeed often the most significant interaction with media is not directly observable by a third party – it’s called thinking stimulated by mediainteraction with an instructor or tutor: this can be direct, through face-to-face contact, or indirect, through e-mail, telephone, or computer conferencing. This can provide all kinds of learning support, from direct feedback, an indication of learning priorities, counselling (academic and personal), clarification, or direct motivationinteraction with other learners: this can provide mutual support, collaborative learning, sharing, and critiques of each others’ work.

The beauty of the Internet is that it allows and supports all three kinds of interaction, so why would we restrict interaction to just one form, that of interaction with media, which is essentially what computer-based learning attempts to do?

 

 


Via Miloš Bajčetić
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Does Group Based Learning Improve Student Learning? - EdTechReview™ (ETR)

Does Group Based Learning Improve Student Learning? - EdTechReview™ (ETR) | Technology | Scoop.it
Many educators consider group learning as an effective tool to improve student learning and collaboration skills.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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'1:X Computing' Aims to Tailor Digital Tools to Learning Tasks - Education Week News

'1:X Computing' Aims to Tailor Digital Tools to Learning Tasks - Education Week News | Technology | Scoop.it
'1:X Computing' Aims to Tailor Digital Tools to Learning Tasks
Education Week News
based nonprofit providing support for districts implementing 1-to-1 computing programs.
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