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How translation apps are ironing out embarrassing gaffes

How translation apps are ironing out embarrassing gaffes | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
The goal of real-time natural language translation is getting closer, but mistakes still happen.
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Cathay Pacific spells own name wrong on new plane

Cathay Pacific spells own name wrong on new plane | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
Cathay Pacific misspelled its name as "Cathay Paciic" on the side of one of its planes.
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A Town in Norway Heated Entirely by a Data Center

A Town in Norway Heated Entirely by a Data Center | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it

In a new town called Lyseparken, being built from scratch on vacant land near Bergen, Norway, a data center will help heat surrounding businesses–part of a design that could create the world’s first energy-positive city.

 

As data centers use energy (globally, they used 416 terawatt-hours of electricity in 2016, more than the entire United Kingdom), one big chunk of that electricity is used to keep servers cool. In the design for the new data center at Lyseparken, instead of fans, a liquid cooling system will send extra heat to a district heating system, which connects to businesses in the area, heating each building via the floor. The liquid loses heat as it travels, so the buildings that need heat most are located closest to the data center. Eventually, the liquid is cool enough that it can loop back to the data center to cool it down–and as that happens, it heats up again to start the process over.

 

In Lyseparken, the data center will sit at the heart of a new business park with 600,000 square meters of office space. The businesses will each have a stake in a local power company, and will each produce and consume electricity from a mix of renewable sources including solar and thermal energy. The data center–which can handle data for businesses or government–will buy solar energy from the power company, and then sell heat back. The arrangement offers low power bills, dividends from the power company for building owners, and, for the data center and other businesses with waste heat, the opportunity to make money from that energy. The new development will also include 3,000-5,000 new houses, which will house people working in the new area. The new town will be close enough to the city of Os that people can bike there.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Festo's Flying Animal Robots Are Real and Magnificent

Festo's Flying Animal Robots Are Real and Magnificent | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
They put even the coolest drones to shame.

 

Just barely making it under the wire of a year full of bizarre and adorable robots, the fancy animal robot-makers at Festo are back with three new flying robots. An industrial automation company, Festo's robotic menagerie also includes herring gulls, kangaroos, ants, an elephant's trunk, and a gripper inspired by the tongue of a chameleon. Festo showed off three new animalistic flying drones at the USA Science and Engineering Festival in Washington, DC last summer, and they can seen beautifully gliding through the air in a video captured by IEEE Spectrum.

 

The eMotionButterfly uses a camera tracking system to fly autonomously, avoiding crashes into the ceiling and walls without human guidance. A kaleidoscope of up to 15 butterflies can work together at once, using the tracking cameras to navigate without crashing into one another.

 

AirJelly, a giant flying jellyfish, is gently propelled up and down by eight tentacles and directed remotely with a bearing inside the helium body. It only weighs about two pounds, and can fly for two hours on one small battery.

 

Last but not least, the AirPenguin is a chubby silver blimp-bot with flippers that help it glide forward through the air, and moveable tail fins and a beak. Each of these creatures seems plucked from alternate reality, where mechanical zoos and Atomic Age-style penguins reign the skies. We'll allow it, even though real penguins don't fly.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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These beautiful maps show our impact on the planet

These beautiful maps show our impact on the planet | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it

From global shipping to undersea cables and population density, these maps highlight our impact on the planet.

 

In a short amount of time, humans have changed the face of planet Earth. Our impact has been so profound, in fact, that scientists have declared the dawn of the Anthropocene epoch, or the age of human influence. Today’s ambitious graphic comes to us from Reldresal, and it looks at this human footprint from a number of different angles. Here are some of the ones we found most interesting.

POPULATION DENSITY

While there are humans present in nearly every part of the world, the overall distribution of population is far from even. As the map above vividly demonstrates, humans cluster in specific places that have the right conditions to support a large population. Massive river deltas such as Ganges-Brahmaputra (Bangladesh) and the Nile (Egypt) are obvious bright spots on the map. Not surprisingly, sparsely populated countries like Australia and Canada are nearly indistinguishable as most people cluster in more habitable places.


Via Lorraine Chaffer, Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Beards galore at British championships

Beards galore at British championships | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
Hirsute competitors were judged in 21 categories of facial hair.
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Seven simple solutions to the surname dilemma - BBC Ideas

Seven simple solutions to the surname dilemma - BBC Ideas | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
Watch the "Seven simple solutions to the surname dilemma" video at BBC Ideas. Explore other related content via our curated "Modern Me" playlist.
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Heatwave reveals England's lost prehistoric sites

Heatwave reveals England's lost prehistoric sites | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
Neolithic monuments, Iron Age settlements and a Roman farm have all been made visible in crop marks.
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Organic solar cells set 'remarkable' energy record

Organic solar cells set 'remarkable' energy record | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
Cheap, flexible solar panels could become a reality as organics achieve the same power efficiency as silicon.
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Wrexham parking signs to be replaced after Welsh errors

Wrexham parking signs to be replaced after Welsh errors | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
A member of the public highlighted the errors by circling several misspelled words with a black pen.
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Brownies launch aviation badge to encourage girls to become pilots

Brownies launch aviation badge to encourage girls to become pilots | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
The Girlguiding UK group is part of a campaign to encourage more women to become pilots.
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Google Translate serves up 'scummy Welsh' translations

Google Translate serves up 'scummy Welsh' translations | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
Scymraeg - or the mistranslation of English-to-Welsh phrases via Google Translate- is a problem.
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Japan's Iga city 'does not need ninjas' after reports it was hiring

Japan's Iga city 'does not need ninjas' after reports it was hiring | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
Officials were alarmed when applications flooded in after mistaken reports the city needed ninjas.
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Mid-Autumn mooncakes: Tasty treats and fancy packaging

Mid-Autumn mooncakes: Tasty treats and fancy packaging | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
Chinese people around the globe are celebrating the Mid-Autumn festival, with mooncakes centre stage.
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Why do we hate wasps and love bees?

Why do we hate wasps and love bees? | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
Both are as ecologically useful, say scientists, and the same effort must be made to protect them.
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12-year-old engineer invents device to combat ocean #microplastic #pollution

12-year-old engineer invents device to combat ocean #microplastic #pollution | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it

"Du created an underwater remotely operated vehicle that uses infrared light to detect, photograph and help remove microplastics from marine environments without harming living creatures.

“Plastics are already a huge problem, and then there are microplastics,” Du told AccuWeather. “When fish eat it, they get a toxin called bisphenol A inside their bodies, and even if they poop the plastics out, they still keep the toxin inside of them.”

The health of humans also faces detrimental impacts from consuming plastic-contaminated fish.

Anna chose to use infrared in her remotely operated vehicle because it can help scientists distinguish microplastics from other nonhazardous materials underwater without having to send samples to a lab.

“I first decided I wanted to do an ocean-related project when I found out that plastics in the ocean were a big problem; I went to the beach at Boston Harbor and I saw plastics everywhere,” Du said."


Via ThePlanetaryArchives - BlackHorseMedia - San Francisco, CineversityTV
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14m bolivars for a chicken: Venezuela hyperinflation explained | World news | The Guardian

14m bolivars for a chicken: Venezuela hyperinflation explained | World news | The Guardian | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
As South American country faces soaraway prices, what is hyperinflation and why is it bad for the economy?
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11 Surprising Facts About Language

11 Surprising Facts About Language | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
By understanding the range language has, you can develop a better appreciation of the subject overall and prepare your mind for your language program.

(Newswire.net -- August 17, 2018) -- If you’re curious about how to learn Spanish or any other language, then it helps to have an understanding about language in general. Beyond linguistics, grammar, and speech, languages themselves have other unique characteristics. There’s more to fluency than foreign language learning programs. By understanding the range language has, you can develop a better appreciation of the subject overall and prepare your mind for your language program.

There are 7097 Languages that Exist Today

How can there be so many different languages? It’s best to think of language as a tree. There is the main trunk or the base of the language, and it breaks into smaller and smaller branches. These branches are language families and dialects. While 7097 is undoubtedly a lot of languages, this doesn’t mean that many of these languages are widely spoken. Many of these languages only have 10,000 speakers. This means that many are at risk of dying out.

2400 Languages Are Endangered

Thousands of languages are endangered. This happens because of a dwindling population of native speakers for those niche languages. People in these areas gravitate towards popular languages as a means of accessing better jobs prospects, more trade, and greater living. The result is that there is less emphasis placed on learning their native languages. At this rate, roughly 40% of the world languages will disappear within 100 years.

A Language Dies Out Every 2 Weeks

While many languages exist in the world, roughly one goes extinct every two weeks. This is because a handful of people only speak the language. As more and more niche cultures experience the cultural mainstream, their identity gets absorbed into it. Disease and war can also cause a language to die out. Children of native speakers who become bilingual often lose fluency in their native language. Their children will typically learn the language of the culture they grow up in as well. This also leads to a language becoming extinct.

573 Languages Are Extinct

When you think of extinct languages, you might think of dead languages like Latin, Ancient Greek, or Old English. However, there is a difference between an extinct language and a dead language. Dead languages are languages that are still in use despite not having any native speakers. Whereas, extinct languages are languages without a community of native speakers. There are currently over 573 extinct languages.  

Half the World’s Population Use Only 23 Languages

While there may be over 7000 languages currently in use around the world, half of the world’s population only uses 23 languages. In descending order based on the population of native speakers, the top ten of these most spoken languages are Chinese, Spanish, English, Arabic, Hindi, Bengali, Portuguese, Russian, Japanese, and Lahnda.

The Bible Is the Most Translated Book in the World

The most translated book in the world shouldn’t come in as a surprise. The Holy Bible in its entirety has been translated into 650 different languages. However, if you’re counting partial translations, the New Testament has been translated into 1521 different languages as well.  Alice in Wonderland, Tintin, and Harry Potter are also widely translated around the world. The second most translated book on the list is the Little Prince, with over 300 translations. Previously the title had been held by Pinocchio with 260 translations in existence.

Languages with the Biggest and Smallest Alphabets

The language with the largest alphabet is Khmer. Over 8 million people, mainly Cambodians, speak this language worldwide; it has 74 letters.

The smallest alphabet belongs to the language Rotokas with a population of 4300 speakers in Papua New Guinea. This language only has 12 letters in their alphabet.  

Papua New Guinea Has the Most Languages

With a population of under 8 million people, Papua New Guinea has the most diverse collection of language in the world with 856 different languages used throughout the country. For comparison, the US has just over 300 languages used across the nation with a population that is 40 times greater.

Learning a Second Language Can Improve Mental Health

Learning more than one language can improve brain health by increasing brain use. Learning a language requires using your brain to concentrate and focus. And brain use helps brain health. Whether it’s through puzzles or games that require you to think, these activities keep your brain active and fight off degenerative brain conditions. It should come as no surprise to anyone who’s attempted to learn a second language or who already has learned one that there is a great deal of mental effort required to maintain fluency.

The US Has No Official Language

Despite what some may think, English is not the official language of the US. The US has no official language. This doesn’t mean that attempts haven’t been made to make English the official language. However, they have been stopped because it is seen as a clash with the constitution, specifically, the freedom of speech.

The US has a history of cultural diversity dating all the way back to the colonies. And while English was the major language used at the time, there was still a rich history and collection of people from different parts of Europe who had settled there with their own established languages. Pushing English might have jeopardized the colonialists’ willingness to work together.

Welsh Is Used in Argentina

In the mid-1800s, Welsh settlers came to Patagonia, Argentina. They brought with them their language that they still use throughout the area today. Unlike other traditional settlers who traveled in search of fame and fortune or to escape from religious persecution, Welsh immigrants came to Patagonia to keep their culture and language alive. In exchange for the land to create a settlement there to preserve the culture of their people, they agreed to submit to Argentinian rule. Today it holds the highest population of Welsh speakers outside of Wales.  

Language Is Diverse

There are plenty more interesting facts about languages. And understanding the unique history and characteristics of language can help build an appreciation for the vast collection of culture and ideas expressed by them throughout the world. While it’s great to search for a quick way to learn Spanish, it’s also important to know other unique facts about language as well. It’s more than simply trivia, it’s a snapshot of one of the most defining characteristics of what it means to be human.   


Via Charles Tiayon
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Korean reunions: Families divided by war meet in North

Korean reunions: Families divided by war meet in North | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
About 200 North and South Koreans will spend a few hours with family they have not seen since the war.
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Wheat gene map to help 'feed the world'

Wheat gene map to help 'feed the world' | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
Researchers are set to develop higher yield wheat varieties requiring less water after making a gene map.
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Parrot swears at London firefighter trying to rescue it from roof

Parrot swears at London firefighter trying to rescue it from roof | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
Macaw parrot Jessie "kept swearing, much to our amusement", the London Fire Brigade says.
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Skeletal 'beests' walk the shoreline

Skeletal 'beests' walk the shoreline | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
Theo Jansen creates "strandbeests", sculptures that move using the power of the wind.
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How to beat the heatwave: creative solutions from Tokyo to Berlin | World news | The Guardian

How to beat the heatwave: creative solutions from Tokyo to Berlin | World news | The Guardian | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
From wearing ice-cube vests to eating dogmeat, the heatwave is driving people to get inventive to stay cool
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Government U-turn a boost for sign language GCSE campaign

Government U-turn a boost for sign language GCSE campaign | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
A deaf schoolboy and his family have been campaigning for the qualification to be introduced.
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The precious metal sparking a new gold rush

The precious metal sparking a new gold rush | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
The race to find new sources of cobalt - the key component in smartphone and electric car batteries.
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