Teaching Young Children about their Needs & the Needs of Others
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Teaching Young Children about their Needs & the Needs of Others
Teaching Early Stage 1 children in HSIE classes how to identify ways in which their needs and the needs of others are met.
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8ways - 2012 Teaching through culture

8ways - 2012 Teaching through culture | Teaching Young Children about their Needs & the Needs of Others | Scoop.it
David Messer's insight:

This is a great site in so many ways: for understanding Aboriginal culture, for teaching classes that have Aboriginal students and for teaching non-Aboriginal students in a different way that will both enhance their learning generally and teach them something about Aboriginal culture.

Although not specifically dedicated to teaching children about needs of themselves and others, because Aboriginal culture and ways of learning are much more community and family-centred than contemporary Western culture, there is a lot here of great use.

The site outlines eight ways of Aboriginal learning. Three in particular would be useful when discussing needs: ‘Story sharing’, ‘Community Links’, ‘Deconstruct Reconstruct’ and ‘Land Links’. There are lots of activities detailed specifically which could be used.

A great example is the ‘yarning circle’ suggested in the site.  This is where, each day, the class sits in a circle and shares stories and experiences. Issues of needs would probably emerge in due course or if not could be suggested by the teacher.

Using the 8 Ways approach – utilising Aboriginal ways of learning in teaching both indigenous and non-indigenous students – not only enhances exploration of needs but also would greatly assist the incorporation of Indigenous perspectives within the curriculum, as proposed by Gilbert and Hoepper (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2006).

 

Additional reference:

Gilbert R & Hoepper, B (Ed) (2011), Teaching Society and Environment.

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Group time activity: The needs of others

Group time activity: The needs of others | Teaching Young Children about their Needs & the Needs of Others | Scoop.it
David Messer's insight:

This is a really nice lesson idea for teaching early stage 1 kids about their needs and the needs of others.

It suggests that the teacher get a picture of a child (from a magazine or elsewhere) and stick it on the wall. Then, in campfire mode, the teacher asks the students to create a narrative around this child (who, the teacher explains, has arrived from outer space), by asking the students to suggest things this child might need. These needs can be of any kind and the teacher writes them on a large sheet of paper.

Once the children have suggested the needs, the teacher then goes through the list, asking the children if these are physical or emotional needs. The teacher then asks the children to identify which 5 of these needs they consider the most important.

Finally the teacher asks the children to suggest ways these needs could be met, broth from the perspective of themselves wanting these needs met by others and themselves helping supply the needs of others.

The nice thing about this is that it caters for students having different abilities and levels of literacy. The main thing would be for the teacher to make sure every child has some input.

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A Science Odyssey: People and Discoveries: Abraham Maslow

A Science Odyssey: People and Discoveries: Abraham Maslow | Teaching Young Children about their Needs & the Needs of Others | Scoop.it

Via Sarah McComb
David Messer's insight:

This is a concise account of psychologist Abraham Maslow (1908-1970) and his “hierarchy of needs.” While on the faculty at Brooklyn College he met anthropologist Ruth Benedict and psychologist Max Wertheimer. He was so impressed by their personalities and behaviour that he began studying them. This developed into broader research into what makes a happy, fulfilled person, leading to his theory of a hierarchy of needs.

Maslow theorised that needs could be identified as fitting into a structure like a ladder or hierarchy. At the bottom were basic needs, physical needs like air, water, food and sex. Next came safety needs – having a secure and stable environment. The third level was social needs – things like love, friendship, acceptance etc. The fourth level was what Maslow termed “self-actualising needs”, having a sense of fulfilment, self-worth or a purpose in life.

Maslow believed that if the needs on the lower part of the ladder were not met, then it would be difficult for an individual to have needs on the upper levels met. A starving man, for example, would not be concerned with what others thought of him or the meaning of life.

Maslow’s work has been influential, but in more recent times has been criticised heavily for a lack of empirical research and a Western cultural bias. However, it is still an interesting concept useful for sparking discussion of needs.

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Roots of Empathy

Roots of Empathy | Teaching Young Children about their Needs & the Needs of Others | Scoop.it
David Messer's insight:

Roots of Empathy is a educational program used in numerous countries that aims to reduce aggression and bullying among children by teaching them empathy and understanding.

It has a number of programs and methods which are documented in books and video clips (available on youtube). One interesting example is one used for primary school children. It involves introducing a baby into the classroom. According to the Roots of Empathy organisation, this procedure has produced significantly positive results in teaching younger children the beginnings of understanding and empathy and the needs of oneself and others.

Roots of Empathy does not appear to be prevalent in Australia but has been adopted by many education authorities in North America, Europe, the UK and New Zealand.

According to the references listed on its web site, Roots of Empathy’s ideas and programs are supported by a significant amount of independent, evidence-based research (eg, Santos RG, et al (2011) Effectiveness of School-Based Violence Prevention for Children & Youth: Cluster Randomized Controlled Field Trial of the Roots of Empathy Program with Replication and Three-Year Follow-Up, Healthy Quarterly 14, pp 80-91.)

Despite not having a presence in Australia, Roots of Empathy appears to eb a useful resource for SSES1.

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Teaching Children Empathy

David Messer's insight:

This is a very practical resource designed for parents but equally applicable for teachers. It outlines why children need to be empathetic and explains ways of teaching children empathy (which relates directly to helping children identify the needs of themselves and others).

It begins with a hypothetical scenario involving one child taking another child’s toy and then the second child hitting the first one in retaliation. It poses several possible reactions, including putting one or both children in time out but concludes that a better option would be to use the situation as an opportunity to teach them about empathy by speaking to both children about the incident and both their feelings.

The article elucidates the importance of empathy, arguing that children who don’t learn empathy can become callous adults; that children as young as 18 months can be taught empathy; that children need to identify and label feelings; and that adults must ‘model empathy’, that is, demonstrate that they themselves are empathetic and under stand the needs of others.

Despite the religious background of the writer occasionally impinging on the text, it remains an accessible and useful starting point for a teacher in terms of both pro-actively teaching children about the needs of themselves and others and resolving situations in the classroom where different students’ needs have led to conflict.

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