Teaching Young Children about the World
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Teaching Young Children about the World
HSIE CCS2.2: How do local, national and global events have an effect on our lives?
Curated by Alison Ho
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Junior Rangers

Junior Rangers | Teaching Young Children about the World | Scoop.it
Parks Victoria's Junior Rangers are born to explore. If you have an interest in nature, animals and the outdoors then Junior Rangers is for you.
Alison Ho's insight:

This is a great and interactive website for children to explore and learn about the environment. Programs offered give open a range of opportunities for children to explore and investigate their environments. Environmental fact sheets are provided on native wildlife, plants, and general information on parks.

 

Although situated in Victoria, this website would receive great credit for involving children in learning about the environment, and how they have a role to play in conservation. Associations like these would present an effective method for governments to revise hunting laws.

 

I found a PDF on their site which discusses the rapid spread of pest animals who pose serious threat to our natural biodiversity. It then states various measure the Victorian government has implemented for pest management. The article focuses on the prevalence of the Red Fox and how mediums have been put in place to maintain the population. It details into the method, reason and impact which control and removal of pests has brought to native flora and fauna populations.

 

Looking at this website, children may be motivated to carry out some of the mentioned activities. Schools could organise frequent excursions to national parks so that children can experience these types of activities themselves. This allows development and understanding of the environment, encouraging deeper thought processes for conservation. Students learn and consider its effects on our local ecosystems and wildlife. Additionally, if schools have a "bush garden" area, students can then explore and attend to sections of the garden as an ongoing project for maintaining the environment.

 

To extend their learning and understanding, students can collaborate in groups of 4 - 6 to create worksheets related to National Parks and hunting for their peers to complete. By doing this, they draw on community links and deconstruct-reconstruct pedagogies themselves (Yunkaporta, T., Kirby, M., 2011) by learning the content and then teaching the content.

 

*****

Yunkaporta, T., Kirby, M. 2011. Yarning up Indigenous Pedagogies: A Dialogue About Eight Aboriginal Ways of Learning. Two way teaching and learning: Toward culturally reflective and relevant education, ACER Press. Camberwell, Victoria.

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Royal National Park - School excursions | NSW National Parks

Alison Ho's insight:

Excursions provide the fundamental exposure students need to find their place in the world. They should be conducted in compliance with the Excursions Policy, in addition to being relevant to the discourse and inclusive for all students.

 

The Royal National Park has historical significance and a vast selection of activities available on site. In planning an excursion to this destination, the aim would be for students to hone their observation and data recording skills, as well as evaluate information and generate hypotheses.

 

The Royal National Park already has pre-made excursion plans, relevant to the interests of stage 2, are: Mini- Worlds and the First National Park in Australia.

 

Mini- Worlds:

Students are given the opportunity to examine and analyse miniature environments, note their interrelationships and the impacts of change on the environment. Through drawing and applying their knowledge students can witness first-hand how certain actions have reverberating effects on other environments.

 

 

Visit the First National park in Australia:

Students explore issues, values and attitudes towards national parks. Animal habitats will be studied through investigative tools. This tour includes a short walk where students investigate the bush around them. This particular tour fulfils the Science outcomes (INV2.7).

 

Possible Activities to follow-up on excursion:

 

#  When taken into context of the hunting, students will see the links between hunting and environmental effect. For example, the sound of a gunshot will scare off any possible prey thus making the hunter redundant in eradicating pest (LT S2.3).

 

#  There is also space for assessment or work in the Creative Arts. After examining the mini-environments, students cancreate an artwork resembling elements of mini-worlds. Students may also be asked to recreate their perception of the national park - perhaps even experiment with forms of media to create their artwork (VAS2.1 and 2.2).

 

#  Students can review and evaluate their visit to the park. This can be in the form of a recount, report, or narrative which also assists in improving their English writing skills (TS2.1).

 

#  Students can display findings and experiences by creating models, posters, or dramas of their experience. These touch on other areas like Science, Visual Arts (VAS2.2) and Drama (DRA2.3). Additionally, students can act out possible scenarios if amateur hunting were permitted.

 

#  Extensive research can be done in areas which interest students. For example, one student may be interested in interrelationships of local ecosystems, hence researching the importance of sustainability in ensuring the health of the environment (LT S2.3).

 

#  A list of class or homework activities could be given to students in the week preceding and following the excursion. Spelling words such as ‘erosion’, ‘sustainability’, ‘ecology’ would be given so that students are given an advantage in understanding the ranger’s talks. In the week following the excursion, students can be asked to list new words they learnt and apply them in various homework activities.

 

*****

Board of Studies NSW (2006). Creative Arts K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: B.O.S.
Board of Studies NSW (2006). English K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: B.O.S.
Board of Studies NSW (2007). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: B.O.S.
Board of Studies NSW (2006). Science and Technology K-6 Syllabus and Outcomes. Sydney: B.O.S.

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100,000 Rats, 42 Tonnes of Poison — And One Slightly Nervous World Heritage Island

100,000 Rats, 42 Tonnes of Poison — And One Slightly Nervous World Heritage Island | Teaching Young Children about the World | Scoop.it
Here’s the plan: Stop rats from killing rare species, with a poison-packing flying squadron carpet-bombing virgin rainforest.
Alison Ho's insight:

This article could work as an extension on hunting or the eradication of pests. It can be treated as providing alternative methods for eradication, and additionally open up thought for the implications on the environment and on life through the usage of poisons. The author lists this implications and the measures and initiatives taken to avoid further damage. There is some discussion on how communities work to fight off plagues of rats and pests.

 

Equally, this text can generate other ideas for citizens and communities to become ecologically sustainable in their actions. Students can research other methods to control pests, curate their own arguments for and against pest control. Students may begin to understand and explore the concept of evolution and natural selection (albeit artificial and man-made for rats who have adapted to the poison). It can also set discussion for whether Australia should free up gun laws if hunting in National Parks were permitted. Global case studies can be used to help students predict the future and dynamic nature of human society. E.g. If Australia abolished gun laws, or the implications of frequent poison use on mankind and the environment.

 

This case could be linked to Science to teach water systems: Once poison is emitted in a certain area, it will inject itself into the environment through evaporation and eventually be recycled and spread around the world through rain which thus creates acid rain.

 

Students can then be asked to evaluate the article or topic: Now that we have researched methods to destroy pests, do you think that by eradicating through poison or firearms, that we are potentially doing more harm to the world and to ourselves?

 

*****

Board of Studies NSW (2007). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: B.O.S.
Board of Studies NSW (2006). Science and Technology K-6 Syllabus and Outcomes. Sydney: B.O.S.
Global Perspectives: A framework for global education in Australian schools (2008). Curriculum Corporation. Victoria.

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The Little Red Yellow Black Website

The Little Red Yellow Black Website | Teaching Young Children about the World | Scoop.it

Via Catherine Smyth
Alison Ho's insight:

The Little Red, Yellow, Black Book provides an entry-point to Indigenous culture and history for everyone. The book introduces and covers most areas required for study of Indigenous Studies throughout Australia. It is particularly useful as it links to curriculum and provides guidelines for ethical research.

 

Content is divided into categories: Who are we?; Culture and Sport; Participation; Resistance and Reconciliation. If we take a further look at Steven’s model of framework (2005), we can see potential points and direction of the site through a case study of traditional Aboriginal hunting (http://www.culturalsurvival.org/publications/cultural-survival-quarterly/australia/traditional-aboriginal-hunting-australia-cultural).

 

To engage students, the class could divide into different groups to collaborate and research issues on the six themes (land, relationship, place, time, language, culture) to be presented either in class, at assembly, to the community, or via the internet (Youtube, website, blog). Students then effectively use a various selection of skills and strategies in interpreting written texts (RS2.6).

 

For example, students can look into:

 

Land – how the Aboriginal people act as one body and the importance of the land to Indigenous Australians. Students also evaluate how Aboriginal interaction with the land demonstrates responsible actions in caring for the environment (ENS2.6)

 

Relationship – Students look at the impact and significance of the historical relationship between both Indigenous and White societies.

 

Place – When studied alongside the case, students can relate and explore the place and positions of those affected by traditional hunting, and amateur hunting.

 

Time – Can you apply your knowledge of Australian history to this situation, and construe your own arguments for allowing traditional Aboriginal hunting in National Parks? If “time” is taken literally, students can construct a timeline by first modelling it with string and then by recreating through physical or ICT (UT S2.9). This involves strengthening their concepts of length (MS2.1) and time (MS2.5) An example of this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GCFLGykMasI

 

Language – Language plays a large role in culture - it defines our sense of place. Students can partake in a debate where they discuss the pros and cons of traditional and amateur hunting. This allows students to understand and relate to the topic and thus gain an understanding of the civil rights of Australian Aborigines.

 

Additionally, students can learn words of the language and design posters to teach the class. In doing so, students can choose to create it via digital/ICT or handwritten means, encouraging better use of technology and/or handwriting presentation skills (WS2.12, UT S2.9).

 

Culture – Students can be asked to draw from their own cultural backgrounds and analyse the case study. They would be encouraged to bring in or talk about aspects of their cultural identity, and on some of the stories or tales which have been passed onto them. By teaching the importance of respect and understanding of various cultures, students should be able to understand and relate to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures (CUS2.3, CUS2.4).

 

*****

Board of Studies NSW (2007). English K-6 Syllabus: B.O.S.
Board of Studies NSW (2007). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: B.O.S.
Board of Studies NSW (2002). Mathematics K-6 Syllabus. Sydney:B.O.S.
Board of Studies NSW (2006). Science and Technology K-6 Syllabus: Outcomes and Indicators. Sydney: B.O.S.
Stevens, V. 2005. Embedding Indigenous Perspectives Model Framework. Unpublished Model Framework, Indigenous Intellectual Property [Powerpoint].

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Catherine Smyth's curator insight, April 17, 2013 3:04 AM

This website, produced by the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies (AIATSIS), features a range of teaching resources, information and digital content for addressing Indigenous perspectives in the classroom. The content is categorised under the topics of 'Who are we?', 'Culture and Sport', 'Participation' and 'Resistance and Reconciliation'.

Glw9879's curator insight, April 18, 2013 1:26 AM

Provides a range of great resources for exploring Indigenous perspectives

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Pest Control and Shooting in Victorian Parks

Alison Ho's insight:

This article was published by the Victorian National Parks Association to inform the general public, and the government, of the effectiveness of shooting in national parks. It details the differences between recreational hunting and targeted hunting for strategic pest control. We learn that recreational hunting is a dangerous sport, often leading to more pest problems. For example, the Recreational hunters are motivated to ‘farm’ Sambar Deer, which encourages an increasing population and thus having no effect in controlling pests. Another issue raised is that recreational hunters avoid areas where the probability of finding their target is low, which leaves yet another area for the population to expand again. Within the article is a list of parks which allow recreational hunting. However, a majority of those parks contain restrictions on where and what hunters can do (e.g. dogs are not allowed). On the other hand, targeted hunting for strategic pest control has been successful. Professional hunters are contracted to operate as specific strategic programs with specific objectives aligned with the park management plan.

 

Upon reading, students can role-play in groups and formulate arguments for and against the shooting scheme from a variety of audiences by going into the wider community to gather thoughts and opinions (TS2.2). For example, a group of five children could play the role of a hunter, while another group as a park ranger (DRA2.1). There are endless possibilities as children can take on roles such as a teacher on excursion, a student on excursion, a family on holiday, a camper, or perhaps even as a native or feral animal. Through this activity, students learn about the effect of a national event on their community and its individuals. (CCS2.2)

 

Such an activity can instigate critical and good thinking. McDonald (2011) state that teachers can encourage good thinking by focusing thinking strategies while reading texts or discussing with students about the themes and issues within. This essentially gives students opportunities to interact with each other in practicing meta-cognitive skills and activities.

 

*****

Board of Studies NSW (2006). Creative Arts K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: B.O.S.
Board of Studies NSW (2006). English K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: B.O.S.
Board of Studies NSW (2007). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Sydney:B.O.S.
McDonald, H., & Gilbert, R. (2011). Planning for Student Learning. In R. Gilbert, & B. Hoeppe, Teaching Society and Environment (p. 119). Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

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