HSIE Stage 3: Teaching the Development of Democratic Rights for Women & Indigenous Australians
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Racism. No Way.: Fact Sheets: Neville Bonner AO (1922 - 1999)
Australia's First Aboriginal Senator

This website aims to tackle racism in schools in Australia, through providing teachers, school students, parents and governors with games, research and lesson ideas that explore the causes and effects of racism for practical use in the classroom.
Sean Casey's insight:

Racism No Way’s fact sheet focusing on the life and achievements Neville Bonner (AO) in developing democratic rights for Indigenous Australians by becoming the first Aboriginal Senator is a useful tool in terms of providing students with factual knowledge. The presentation of facts according to the National Research Council on How People Learn is considered essential in developing competency in different areas of student knowledge (Smyth, 2014). This factual sheet does exactly that as it presents both life events and anecdotes from Bonner himself to provide teachers with information to deliver to their students, from which they can create learning activities to contextualize and organize student knowledge in terms of a conceptual framework. This resource also has connections to the Key Learning Area of English (EN3-3A) ‘uses integrated range of skills strategies and knowledge to read, view and comprehend a wide range or texts in different media and technology’ (NSW BoS, 2012), as this type of factual text requires students to engage with the role of a text analyst.

 

A learning activity to conceptualize the facts provided by Racism No Way in terms of the development of democratic rights for Indigenous Australians would be to use a social investigation strategy to make judgments and present findings about the source (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p.57). As a class, a joint review and discussion of the source can occur, whereby students and the teacher read the fact sheet aloud to review its content. Class discussion relating to the validity of the source can occur as students become familiar with analyzing their knowledge.

 

From there students proceed to an individual construction of a timeline of Bonner’s life, this learning activity is also crucial to establishing a conceptualization of the time in which Bonner’s achievements took place, and can be seen as an important component of the learning triangle, where the learning activity and assessment must both be geared toward the same learning outcome. In terms of assessing student knowledge, the teacher can ask students to select an event on their timeline and reflect on its significance for example: when Neville was 5 and moved to mainland Australia he was not able to go to school.

 

Racism No Way’s factual sheet on Neville Bonner not only introduces Stage 3 Students to an important source of new knowledge but it also is a device that can be considered central to developing individual members of society that are informed about values, citizenship and Australian history (Harvie, 2013, p.10). Due to its ability to be used by teachers wanting to organise their students' knowledge in relation to the syllabus outcome of important figures and events that led to the development of Democracy Worldwide. Also, familiarizing students with resources and organisations such as Racism No Way will have a profound importance on their educational journey. 

 

References

 

Harvie, K. The humanities curriculum in a changing world [online]. Ethos, Vol. 21, No. 1, Mar 2013: 10-13. Availability: <http://search.informit.com.au.ezproxy2.library.usyd.edu.au/documentSummary;dn=256690368067839;res=IELHSS>;

 

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching society and environment. South Melbourne, VIC: Cengage Learning. 

 

NSW BoS,. English K-10 syllabus, 2012 accessed Friday April 4, 2014 from 

http://syllabus.bos.nsw.edu.au/english/

 

Smyth, K. (2014, March 12) How To Teach HSIE K-6. 

 

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Dame Enid Lyons: a pioneer for women in parliament

Dame Enid Lyons: a pioneer for women in parliament | HSIE Stage 3: Teaching the Development of Democratic Rights for Women & Indigenous Australians | Scoop.it
What would it be like to be one of only two women in an Australian parliament dominated by men? That was the situation...
Sean Casey's insight:

Dame Enid Lyons epitomizes the role of a key person in the development of democracy within Australia and has the potential to be compared to many others that had a more global impact. ABC Splash provides a rich source of teaching and learning activities targeted at specific year levels within the Australian Education System, and in this case has used genuine archived audio to present students with a stimulus to critically enquire about the important role that Dame Lyons had in being the first female member of the House of Representatives.

 

Typically ABC Splash resources present learning ideas along with the subject matter, and this resource is no different. However, with every learning idea it is up to the discretion of the classroom teacher to decide how they will adapt it to suit the individual learning needs of their students.  A lesson idea based on this resource can be constructed with the assistance of the already provided: before listening, as you listen, after listening and next step critical thinking activities. A whole class discussion and brainstorm activity can take place focused on comparing the life of a female politician in Dame Lyon’s era to a present day female politician such as Jenny Wong, Kate Ellis or Julia Bishop, by using this search engine as a starting point for research http://www.aph.gov.au/Senators_and_Members/Parliamentarian_Search_Results?q=&mem=1&par=-1&gen=2&ps=0.

 It is during this category of learning activity that teachers must be wary of avoiding being advocating, explicitly or implicitly a particular position (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p.55).

 

Equally useful are the ‘as you listen’  focus questioned posed by the resource, especially the one asking students to consider the relationship between men and women during that time period. However, in order to address the learning outcomes of key figures or events in developing democracy students need to participate in the critical investigative task in which they research the current number of female members of parliament and compare that figure to their initial expectations. Here, a simple compare and contrast activity may take place.

 

This resource has the potential to cross over into the English learning outcome EN3-5B, discusses how language is used to achieve a widening range of purposes for a widening range of audiences and consequences, as students are actively engaged in listening to the speech, and coming to terms with its significance and they are also required to consider the specific audience. The students can also use this resource in conjunction with the Australian Electoral Commission poster to position Dame Lyons entry into Parliament on the timeline presented on that poster.

 

In terms of assessment, many of the enquiry questions require students to research, so the teacher may assess the capacity of their students to locate and use relevant sources whether they are digital or not to develop their understanding and provide evidence for their point of views.  Another key component of this resource that needs to be addressed in the classroom, is the global perspective provided by Dame Lyons, teacher lead discussion of her quote “this is the first occasion upon which a woman has addressed this house. For that reason, it's an occasion which, for every woman in the Commonwealth, marks, in some degree, a turning point in history.” As students can gain insight into the significance of Dame Lyons role in developing gender equality, and how democracy plays an essential role in the promotion of social equality.

 

References

 

NSW BoS,. English K-10 syllabus, 2012 accessed Sunday April 5, 2014 from 

http://syllabus.bos.nsw.edu.au/english/

 

 

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching society and environment. South Melbourne, VIC: Cengage Learning. 

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Suffragettes - the battle for the vote for women

Suffragettes - the battle for the vote for women | HSIE Stage 3: Teaching the Development of Democratic Rights for Women & Indigenous Australians | Scoop.it
An examination of the Suffragette struggle for the right of women to vote.
Sean Casey's insight:

 

This resource curated by the BBC learning zone provides students with a global perspective on the development of democratic rights for women, and the role played by influential figures such as Emmeline and Christabel Pankhurst. Due to the resource being centered on outlining the strategies and tactics of the Suffragette movement, a key approach when using this source in a Stage 3 learning context would be to focus on the consequences of the Suffragette’s action. Gilbert and Hoepper identify a need for students to not only be able to understand the values of a historical event but to also ‘probe the effects and consequences of those values’ (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p.230). In order to facilitate that in the classroom the teacher needs to ensure the students are given an opportunity to demonstrate their ideas and understanding of how the role that the Suffragette movement played in developing democracy worldwide. A post viewing questionnaire that can be conducted as a class or individually centered on focus questions such as:

 

Where the rights of men and women equal during the time of the suffragette movement?

 

Why do you think the suffragette’s chose the Houses of Parliament as a place to protest for their rights?

 

However, it is an important consideration to include the students when developing focus questions. So an additional activity may be negotiating the questions after the students have viewed the footage. 

 

A simulation game is another learning idea in which teachers can scaffold student understanding of the consequences of the values embedded in the Suffragette’s cause. To deepen student understanding teachers need to be able to develop simulations where students enact ‘particular social situations to develop a sense of how others might feel’ (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p.150). After viewing this resource students can participate in a 'simulation' of a democratic process that they are familiar with, such as electing a class member for the Student Representative Council. The teacher then adds stipulations or restrictions to the election such as, in this ballet only the male or female class members are allowed to vote. This provides  students with an insight into what it feels like to be denied their democratic rights. At the conclusion of this activity students can collectively brainstorm what emotions and ideas they associated with being denied their right to vote, or having their rights whilst some of their peers did not.

 

Gilbert and Hoepper note how in simulation learning activities some students may project into their roles some preconceptions, however, the teacher can refer back to the resource which has accurate historical accounts of the event. Another important teaching consideration when using this resource is to note how Stage 3 students may not be familiar with the term ‘suffrage’ therefore, links between the ABC Australian Suffrage resource should be made explicit throughout the learning experience. 

 

References

 

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching society and environment. South Melbourne, VIC: Cengage Learning. 

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a3-indigenous-vote-poster.pdf

Sean Casey's insight:

The Australian Electoral Commission’s Website has many classroom resources that have the potential to increase student understanding of key events and people that assisted with the development of democracy worldwide. One such example of a resource is the ‘Louder than One Voice’ poster marking the 50th Anniversary of the Indigenous Right to Vote at federal elections (AEC, 2013). Gilbert and Hoepper note how students need to be engaged in critical reflection when undertaking-learning activities focused on the humanities (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p. 56), and the classroom activities requiring students to reflect, consider, involve, communicate, explore, investigate and research issues relating to the development of democratic rights for Indigenous Australians ensures that a social investigative approach must be used.

 

The visual depiction of key events that led to the development of Indigenous democratic rights not only presents students with facts but also simultaneously contextualizes the significant events in the form of an easy to read timeline. It has a direct link to the Racism No Way! Source and combined gears students with the capacity to become socially aware citizens. It can be argued that aspects of this contain elements of Wiggins and McTighe’s Backward Design (2005) inquiry learning scaffold. This is evident as the classroom activities have each been designed with a clear goals related to the concept of Australian Democracy for example, the investigative activity has a goal of student research in order to achieve the desired learning outcomes.

 

On top of that each activity is aligned to certain pedagogy for example, by asking students why they think some Australians choose not to vote in elections, this resource combined with a classroom teachers input allows students to take action in order to progress through Vygotsky’s Zone of Proximal Development, ultimately enabling Stage 3 students to empathize with different view points as they are forced to investigate a range of opinions (McInerney & McInerney, 2010, p. 54).

 

However, aspects of this teaching resource will need to be modified to suit the specific needs of individual students within a Stage 3 setting. The Consider question requires higher order thinking that many Stage 3 students may find challenging. Overall, this resource provides many links with other KLA’s, especially in the Communicate component of the learning activities, as students are required to compose an emotive text, linked with the English outcome EN3-1A Communicates effectively for a variety of audiences and purposes using increasingly challenging topics, idea, issues and language forms and features or design a poster linked to the creative arts outcome VAS3.2 Makes artworks for different audiences, assembling materials in a variety of ways.

 

The Australian Electoral Commission has a range of educational resources, and this poster not only provides information on significant events and people in the development of democracy in Australia, but it provides a resonating Indigenous perspective, assisting students to develop knowledge and essential understandings about Australia’s Shared History (NSW BoS, 1999, p.5). Teachers may contact the AEC for a copy of this poster to display in their classrooms. 

 

References

 

Australian Electoral Commission,. (2013)  Accessed April 4 from: http://www.aec.gov.au/Education/classroom-resources.htm

 

Board of Studies, NSW (1999) K-6 HSIE Units of Work Support Document, BOS Sydney Accessed  April 4 from: http://k6.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/wps/portal/go/hsie

 

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching society and environment. South Melbourne, VIC: Cengage Learning. 

 

McInerney, D. M, & McInerney, V. (2010). Educational psychology: construction learning. Frenchs Forest, NSW: Pearson. 

 

Wiggins, G. & McTighe, J. (2005). Understanding by Design, Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, Alexandria.

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Women and Democracy

Sean Casey's insight:

This factual resource provides teachers with a clear definition of the term Suffrage and description of the Suffragette movement. Elements of this resource are very important for teachers to use in order to present their students with factual knowledge on the role of the Suffragette’s in terms of developing female democratic rights.

 

For example a teacher can take this excerpt from the resource: “The Australian Women's Suffrage Society was formed in 1889. The aims of the society were to obtain the same rights for women as were possessed by male voters.” To introduce the concept of Suffrage to their students, and then support that information by using this excerpt to construct a global perspective on the development of the democratic rights for women “New Zealand women had become the first in the world to gain the right to vote in the national election. In 1894 South Australian Women were granted the right to vote followed by Western Australia in 1899, NSW in 1902 and finally Victoria in 1908. Australian women (except Aboriginal women) were enfranchised for the new Commonwealth Parliament in 1901. Women first voted in second Federal election in 1903. 2. However, women were not eligible for election to the State parliaments until the end of the First World War.” 

 

Key teaching points from this information would be to ensure terms such as ‘enfranchised’ and ‘eligible’ are explicitly defined. After the presentation of these facts students need to be involved in a learning activity that helps them understand this knowledge in terms of a broader conceptual framework (Smyth, 2014). Below are some learning ideas that will help provide a conceptual framework. 

 

A learning activity that would assist students to understand the concepts and social values associated with the Suffragette movement and to help teachers foreground the values promoted in this resource whilst encouraging students to view these values as open to interpretation (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p.55) would be to examine and discuss the importance of the  first leaflet of the Victorian Suffragette movement and then instruct students to construct an appropriation using different technology.

A clearer image of the leaflet is available here: http://www.abc.net.au/ola/citizen/women/imgs/herstoryleaflet.gif, a ‘Agree’ or ‘Disagree’ class discussion can be conducted where the teacher reads out the questions present on the leaflet, the subsequent ‘Yes’ statement before allowing the students to indicate if they agree with the statement, and to share their ideas. The same can occur when the teacher reads out the ‘No’ statement.

 

Classroom discussion is viewed as central to learning in social education, as contemporary theory presents learning as a social experience in which dialogue allows students to engage in the meaningful exchange of ideas, leading to students exploring the concept and modes of inquiry that define the humanities (Whitehouse, 2008, p. 32). However, it is important when introducing a complex concept such as the Suffragette movement in the Stage 3 classroom, that teachers play an active role in directing the discussion.

 

This resource provides clear factual information relating to the Suffragette movement and its importance to development of democracy worldwide, however, teachers need to ensure that they only present the excerpts outlined above as the other content may be considered inappropriate for a Stage 3 level. Teachers can construct a timeline showing students the development and consequences of the movement, and conduct an ‘Agree’ or ‘Disagree’ class discussion to assist student’s ability to critically inquire about the significance of historical events and the development of social values. 

 

References

 

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching society and environment. South Melbourne, VIC: Cengage Learning. 

 

Smyth, K. (2014, March 12) How To Teach HSIE K-6.

 

Whitehouse, J. A. Talking humanities : questions and co-operative learning. [online]. Social Educator; v.26 n.1 p.32-36; May 2008. Availability: <http://search.informit.com.au.ezproxy2.library.usyd.edu.au/fullText;dn=168678;res=AEIPT&gt;

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