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Movie-making for everyone | Plotagon

Movie-making for everyone | Plotagon | Teaching English | Scoop.it

Plotagon is a tool that lets anyone create an animated movie directly from a written screenplay. Write your story, choose actors, environments and music. Press play and your movie is done. It's that simple.


Via Nik Peachey
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Jennifer Cowley's curator insight, November 25, 2013 11:03 PM

Looks like it has great potential, especially given the death of Xtranormal.

Ester Feldman's curator insight, December 28, 2013 5:03 PM

Thanks again 

Guusje Moore's curator insight, January 20, 2014 7:35 PM

Wonder if this will work as a "next step" afterAnimoto

Rescooped by Ella Brettschneider from Science: resources for South African teachers
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Suddenly Africa is looking up

Suddenly Africa is looking up | Teaching English | Scoop.it
Far-flung lowtech satellite dishes have been bringing the continent up to astronomical speed.

 

Boredom is an under-appreciated and misunderstood tool in scientific innovation. Albert Einstein was pushing paper in a patent office when he developed his general theory of relativity, which altered the foundations of physics. In 2008 Mike Gaylard, then the associate director for radio astronomy at the Hartebeesthoek Radio Astronomy Observatory (Hart­RAO), was bored.

A bearing on the 26m dish was broken – 48 years of hard use tends to do that and engineers were flown in from the United States to fix it.

This left Gaylard with time on his hands. So what does an astronomer do when he can't explore the skies? Well, from the sound of it, he became a chair-bound explorer, investigating lesser-known parts of Africa with Google Earth.


Via Andrew van Zyl
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Rescooped by Ella Brettschneider from Science: resources for South African teachers
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Google Thinks Autonomous Flying Drones Are the Future of Clean Energy

Google Thinks Autonomous Flying Drones Are the Future of Clean Energy | Teaching English | Scoop.it

Google just bought one of the most promising airborne drones in development—it's not for surveillance, it's not for the military, and it's not for hobbyists. It's for making clean energy. It's essentially a giant, autonomous wind turbine that takes to the sky like a mechanical kite. And it may be integral to the future of wind power.

Makani Power, who we've covered extensively in the past, has been acquired by Google X, the search giant's secretive research and investment arm. Makani seems pretty pumped. The cleantech concern has for years pursued a unique goal: float kite-like wind turbines higher into the air, where they can harness the more consistent, more powerful wind that their earthbound tri-bladed brethren can't reach. Makani designed these drone kites to automatically take off and adjust themselves to the windstream to maximize energy production.


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Flocabulary - Five Elements of a Story

Flocabulary - Five Elements of a Story | Teaching English | Scoop.it
Review the Five Elements of a Short Story (Plot, Character, Conflict, Theme & Setting) with Flocabulary’s educational rap song and lesson plan.
Ella Brettschneider's insight:

This is such a great website to subscribe to!

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Climate Change Will Drastically Harm at Least Two-Thirds of All Plants and Animals on Earth

Climate Change Will Drastically Harm at Least Two-Thirds of All Plants and Animals on Earth | Teaching English | Scoop.it

According to a paper out today in Nature Climate Change by researchers at the University of East Anglia… a full two-thirds of all plant and animal life are expected to decline dramatically, if not disappear, if the planet continues on its current warming trend. That's a full-on disaster. Two-thirds is a staggering figure. Imagine wherever you are right now with even half of its plant and animal life. Even in the unwildest part of the largest, most industrial city on Earth, that’s an uncomfortable notion. Note that we’re not talking about the Gunnison Sage Grouse or other threatened species, but the day-to-day life we generally take for granted. And the day-to-day life that humans depend on for things like water and air purification, flood control, nutrient cycling, and eco-tourism. Not to mention slightly less tangible things like emotional well-being.


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