Just because a question comes from a higher grade level doesn’t make it rigorous: Rigor, with Grant Wiggins -- Part 1 | Teaching | Scoop.it

Just because a question comes from a higher grade level doesn’t make it rigorous. And rigor is surely not an absolute but relative criterion, referring to the intersection of the learner’s prior learning and the demands of the question. (This will make mass testing very difficult, of course).


To me, rigor has (at least) 3 other aspects when testing:

  1. learners must face a novel (-seeming) question,
  2. do something with an atypically high degree of precision and skill
  3. both invent and double-check the approach and result, be it in math or writing a paper.


The novel (or novel-seeming) aspect to the challenge typically means that there is some new context, look and feel, changed constraint, or other superficial oddness than what happened in prior instruction and testing. (i.e. what Bloom said had to be true of any “application” task in the Taxonomy).


Via Mel Riddile