Purposeful Pedagogy
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Why I Love Teachers

Why I Love Teachers | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
There are teachers, and there are Teachers. I respect anyone who steps into a classroom, but I adore educators for whom teaching is as much a vocation as a job. Why? Because when Teachers go on vac...

Via Shanthi Cumaraswamy Streat
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Purposeful Pedagogy
An online library of effective teaching techniques and methodologies which inspire enduring and meaningful learning.
Curated by Dean J. Fusto
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How We Learn What We Learn

From the big thinkers of the previous century that have influenced our own understanding of learning, to the strategic implementation of those pricnciples in designing pedagogy, this text sheds light on the great heritage that we draw upon in our...

Via Ness Crouch, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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Rabbi Avi Bossewitch's curator insight, March 3, 2015 8:16 PM

Excellent review of 20th century ed thought leaders and how they inform 21st century learning

Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, April 20, 2015 7:20 PM

A short biography of a number of leading thinkers contributors work in education i.e. Dewey, Montessori, Freire, etc.

 

@ivon_ehd1

Skylly_W's comment, June 15, 2016 10:40 PM
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Using Your Read Aloud to Teach Writing

Using Your Read Aloud to Teach Writing | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Using your read aloud to notice and teach writing skills is not as difficult as you think. Here are some ideas to help your students think like writers.
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Patrice Bucci's curator insight, December 3, 9:53 AM
Many teachers use read aloud to teach comprehension strategies ~ not enough use read alouds for teaching writing...great post that highlights how to utilize a read aloud/think aloud to notice and note qualities of good writing
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24 of the Best Writing Prompts for Middle School Students

24 of the Best Writing Prompts for Middle School Students | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Looking for a dose of inspiration for your middle school writing workshop? Look no further than our list of best writing prompts for middle school students.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Monica S Mcfeeters
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Great Points - Letter to a Discouraged Student via a caring school principal @Steelethoughts

Great Points - Letter to a Discouraged Student via a caring school principal @Steelethoughts | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
To a discouraged student, You're discouraged.  I know you are.  Your heart sunk when you saw the grade. But that letter grade doesn'

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Monica S Mcfeeters
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My Modern Professional Learners Toolkit

My Modern Professional Learners Toolkit | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Jane Hart has derived a framework for the Modern Professional Learner’s Toolkit, based on the results of her Top 100 Tools for Learning survey results. After reading Harold Jarche and Clark Quinn’s personal toolkits, I was inspired to share my own. Trusted Web Resources This one could get quite large and is ever evolving but…

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15 Math Sites That Won’t Make You Fall Asleep

15 Math Sites That Won’t Make You Fall Asleep | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
My students, especially my 4th and 5th graders, love math challenges.  If I can, I find ones that don't show the answer so we can all try to figure them out.  I think it's good for the students to see me struggling (and I really do!), and how I handle frustration over particularly devilish problems.…

Via Cyndi Danner-Kuhn
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30 Free Google Drawings Graphic Organizers

30 Free Google Drawings Graphic Organizers | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Several years ago when I started making webinars, my first one was on creating Graphic Organizers with Google Drawings . This wa

Via Linda Foote, Jim Lerman
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Linda Foote's curator insight, October 12, 1:50 AM
Here are 30 free graphic organizers.
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Educational Leadership: Unleashing Problem Solvers: Apprenticing Students into a Way of Thinking

Educational Leadership: Unleashing Problem Solvers: Apprenticing Students into a Way of Thinking | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it

"In the video accompanying this column, Nancy engages a group of 10th grade students. From a choice of several books that explore the question of how our social and cultural community or context shape who we are, the students in this group have selected to read The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie (Little, Brown and Company, 2007). These students have yet to demonstrate their skills in drawing conclusions from texts. In previous lessons, they made guesses or used their personal experiences to respond to questions and engage in discussion on texts. Nancy is concerned that they won't perform well when given a writing prompt (which is a type of problem a student needs to marshal resources for and solve), particularly this upcoming prompt:

 

"How does our social and cultural community or context shape who we are? After reading The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie, identify one or more themes (big ideas) and provide specific evidence from the text to support your analysis. Remember to apply insight by citing small but important details, and address the complicated issues that Alexie raises in the short story.1 

 

"As you watch Nancy support four students' learning, note the actions of the other students. Some are working on computers, drafting their responses to the writing prompt. Others are reading in their selected books or talking quietly in their book clubs. Nancy works with four students who've all read the same text. Other students are reading this text, but their assessment data indicates that they are drawing conclusions with evidence and don't need the small-group lesson at this time."


Via Jim Lerman
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'Personalized Learning' is For Everyone in the System

'Personalized Learning' is For Everyone in the System | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
If we want teachers to step away from being the information deliverers and empower students to become active and engaged learners, leaders must do so with their teachers.

Via Dr. Deborah Brennan
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‘Prof, I Need an Extension …’ Taking a Look at Student Excuses

‘Prof, I Need an Extension …’ Taking a Look at Student Excuses | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
“My Dad’s in the hospital.” “I’ve been sick with the flu.” “My computer hard drive crashed.” Adjudicating student excuses takes the wisdom of Solomon.

Via Becky Roehrs
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Becky Roehrs's curator insight, November 3, 5:04 PM

Interesting..and a very good list of common excuses used by students..

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The 6 Drivers of Inquiry-Based Learning - Cooper on Curriculum

The 6 Drivers of Inquiry-Based Learning - Cooper on Curriculum | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
As an administrator, whenever I walk into a teacher’s classroom, one of the first things I almost always subconsciously look for is whether or not the students are engaged in inquiry. However, telling a teacher, “Your students need to engage in more inquiry,” is comparable to letting a comedian know she needs to be funnier or asking a pizzaiolo to make a better dough. And, vague directives in the absence of explicit instruction typically generate anxiety.

To avoid these anxieties, and for progress to actually take place, we need to drill down to the nitty gritty and be as explicit as possible. In other words, we need to be explicit about being explicit and leverage specific strategies to comfortably move forward for the benefit of our students.

With these thoughts in mind, I’ve been obsessing over inquiry’s common denominators – the strategies or drivers we should always consider when implementing an inquiry-based lesson.

That being said, here are the six drivers of inquiry-based learning. And, while I don’t think every lesson or activity must have all six, I do believe that once we (and our students) become comfortable with an inquiry approach, all drivers will naturally find a way into learning experiences on a regular, if not daily, basis.

Via John Evans, Monica S Mcfeeters
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Carlos Fosca's curator insight, November 2, 8:06 AM

El aprendizaje basado en la indagación (inquiry-based learning) se puede definir como aprendizaje que comienza planteando preguntas, problemas o escenarios, en lugar de simplemente presentar hechos establecidos o describir un camino liso, sin obstáculos aparentes, hacia el conocimiento. En resumen, descubrimos material, en contraposición a la cobertura de contenido y a la memorización y regurgitación de hechos y conocimiento.

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10 Tips About Using Images in Your Classroom via @AskATechTeacher

10 Tips About Using Images in Your Classroom via @AskATechTeacher | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Here are ten of the most-visited image-use tips on Ask a Tech Teacher: 10 Tips About Using Images in the Classroom You Don’t Want to Miss Image Copyright Do’s and Don’ts Photos For Class–Robust, St…

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Sharryn Cunningham's curator insight, October 31, 9:22 PM
Great tips for internet security in classrooms
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6 Traits of Life-Changing Teachers

6 Traits of Life-Changing Teachers | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
We asked our community what makes teachers unforgettable. Here’s what they said.
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Classroom Management Resources

Classroom Management Resources | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Here are some of the best articles I’ve written on the topic that have appeared in various publications:
Teacher: What happened when my students’ behavior took a ‘major turn for the worse’
Why Viewing Classroom Management as a Mystery Can Be a Good Thing
Teacher: How my 9th graders graded me
Cultivating a Positive Environment for Students
Positive, Not Punitive, Classroom Management Tips
More Positive, Not Punitive, Classroom Management Tips
A “Good” Class Gone “Bad”…And Back To “Good” Again
Five Guidelines For Effective Classroom Management

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The Three-Step System For Getting Students to Do the Talking via By AJ Juliani

The Three-Step System For Getting Students to Do the Talking via By AJ Juliani | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
I remember the first time I heard the phrase "student-centered classroom" and I almost chuckled. I had always believed my classroom was about the students, they were the reason we taught and my focus was always

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Aysin Alp
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Making Sure Your Praise Is Effective

Making Sure Your Praise Is Effective | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Research-backed ideas on how to give meaningful praise to inspire and reinforce positive behavior.

Via Tibshirani, Monica S Mcfeeters
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The Big List of Class Discussion Strategies

The Big List of Class Discussion Strategies | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Here they are: 15 formats for structuring a class discussion to make it more engaging, more organized, more equitable, and more academically challenging.

Via Ove Christensen
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5 questions to ask before assigning homework via Matt Miller

5 questions to ask before assigning homework via Matt Miller | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Teachers have widely varying opinions on homework. Before assigning it, think through these five questions first.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, November 18, 12:21 PM
Is the homework meaningful and can students do it at home? Can students assume responsiblity for their learning? Those are essential questions for me.

Understanding what research tells us about homework is important.
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5 Principles of Outstanding Classroom Management

5 Principles of Outstanding Classroom Management | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
3. Set Rules, Boundaries, and Expectations (and Do It Early)
Students don’t thrive amid chaos. They need some basic structure—and consistency—to feel safe and to focus.

But maintaining a culture of mutual respect doesn’t mean your goal is to “make pals,” noted middle school reading coach Heather Henderson. “You can’t be their friend. You can be kind, loving, and supportive, but you still have to be their teacher.” Establish the code of conduct early in the year, and be sure that everyone—including the teacher—makes an effort to stay true to it. Predictability counts: “Follow through with rewards and consequences. If you say it, mean it. And if you mean it, say it. Be clear, be proactive, and be consistent,” said Lori Sheffield.

There was broad consensus among educators that modeling appropriate classroom behavior sets the tone for children: “You make the weather,” said Diana Fliginger from Minot, North Dakota. “Your attitude as the teacher really determines what the tone and environment of your classroom is like. If you want calm and productive, project that to your kids.” Many others cautioned that while enforcing rules consistently is critical, it’s important to pick your battles too—especially if those confrontations are going to be public: “Instead, say, ‘You and I will talk about this later,’” advises Denise Tremblay Drapeau. “That way you can still address the issue while saving face. It completely changed the vibe in my classroom.”

Via Mel Riddile
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Three Ideas for Implementing Learner Reflection

Three Ideas for Implementing Learner Reflection | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Educators have long recognized the importance and applicability of critical reflection across a wide range of educational settings, yet in practice it remains a challenging and nebulous concept for many to firmly grasp. In education, the concept of reflection dates back to the work of John Dewey (1933), who defined it as “active, persistent and careful consideration of any belief or supposed form of knowledge in the light of the grounds that support it and the further conclusion to which it tends” (p. 9). Dewey was the first to point out that experience alone does not constitute learning; instead, a conscious realization must occur for the experience to become a source of learning.

In examining the depth of reflection, Rogers (2001) made an influential and careful study and synthesis, while Peltier, Hay, and Drago (2005) put forward a way to evaluate different levels of reflective thinking, which include habitual actions, understanding, reflection, and critical reflection (refer to Weimer, 2012). Yet the void of ecologically valid classroom-based research on incorporating reflection to improve student learning has left teachers largely on their own when it comes to creating opportunities for reflection in their courses.

Via Jim Lerman
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David W. Deeds's curator insight, November 6, 11:16 PM

Thanks again to Jim Lerman. 

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, November 7, 1:52 AM
hree Ideas for Implementing Learner Reflection
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Retrieval Practice: A Teachers' Definition and Video Examples

Retrieval Practice: A Teachers' Definition and Video Examples | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
We’ve been reading up a lot on retrieval practice lately.  Hopefully we’re not alone in that. From a cognitive science standpoint it’s absolutely central to improving learning.

You might recall  Daniel Willingham’s assertion about the importance of knowledge:

Data from the last thirty years lead to a conclusion that is not scientifically challengeable: thinking well requires knowing facts, and that’s true not simply because you need something to think about. The very processes that teachers care about most — critical thinking processes such as reasoning and problem solving — are intimately intertwined with factual knowledge that is in long-term memory (not just found in the environment).

There are two parts of Willingham’s assertion:

1) You can only think deeply and critically about what you know well—what you have a lot of knowledge about—and

2)  To aid thinking, that knowledge must be encoded in long-term memory. Retrieval practice is the tool that encodes knowledge in long term memory.

Via Mel Riddile
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Great Teachers Don't Teach

Great Teachers Don't Teach | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Blogger Ben Johnson outlines constructivist and experiential teaching techniques that go beyond direct instruction.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Stewart-Marshall
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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, October 6, 2:23 PM
The objective is that good teachers create an environment where each student's learning can emerge. I don't think that means they don't teach. Gert Biesta uses John Dewey in his writing argues that teaching is relational. Having a strong grasp of content, being able to deliver it, caring for one's students, etc. each go into creating the environment where learning can emerge.
DEGERT Louis's curator insight, October 11, 4:32 AM
Improving teacher's efficiency 
Margaret Annen's curator insight, October 22, 5:03 PM
"Great Teachers Don't Teach" really sums it up with the idea that real teaching doesn't take place until the student does on their own.  This article relates to my project because I believe one way teachers can learn how to let go is for them to be in the same situation as they need to let their students be and that is be left to do.  The only issue perhaps is educators may go through and experience doing, but giving up the control is hard because day in and day out you have been doing the doing. I believe learning how to let go must be accomplished by learning how to let go.  Educators must plan a lesson and say include one or two steps of letting go.  Then they must build on it, so that day after day they themselves feel comfortable with letting go.  Managing a classroom of students who must do specific things on their own looks and feels different because the students are engaged to the point that they do not want to be interrupted rather they are feverishly and committed to learning.  
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Making Student Feedback Work

Making Student Feedback Work | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it

Via Grant Montgomery
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The Power of Being Seen - Edutopia

The Power of Being Seen - Edutopia | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
When the bell rang for early dismissal on a recent afternoon at Cold Springs Middle School in Nevada, students sprinted toward the buses while teachers filed into the library, where posters filled with the names of every child in the 980-student school covered the walls.

Taking seats where they could, the teachers turned their attention to Principal Roberta Duvall, who asked her staff to go through the rosters with colored markers and make check marks under columns labeled “Name/Face,” “Something Personal,” “Personal/Family Story,” and “Academic Standing,” to note whether they knew the child just by name or something more—their grades, their family’s story, their hobbies.


Via John Evans
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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, November 6, 4:01 PM
Early in my career, I learned two essential things about teaching. First, students want us to know who they are. They have names, faces, and stories. Second, they want to know who we are as people. This latter point was driven home when I substituted in a kindergarten class for two days, an assignment I was ill-prepared for.
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Making 'Big Data’ useful rather than scary for teachers - The Hechinger Report

Making 'Big Data’ useful rather than scary for teachers - The Hechinger Report | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Atlanta Public Schools is on the leading edge of a new trend in education: getting helpful data to teachers in formats they can understand and leverage with their students. For years, districts nationwide have monitored standardized test data and other measures, reporting it to the state and watching trends across schools. Some have passed along that data to principals and instructional leaders to guide school improvement work, but few have sent it all the way to teachers, who make the day-to-day decisions in classrooms.

Via Gordon Dahlby
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7 Strategies for Getting Your Learners to Start Thinking Independently

7 Strategies for Getting Your Learners to Start Thinking Independently | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it

"Many people believe getting our learners to begin thinking independently is the main goal of education. “Teach students so that they don’t need the teacher.” But what if that wasn’t the case? What if there were something higher than independence? After all, Stephen Covey reminds us: independent thinking alone is not suited to interdependent reality.

Thinking independently comes as a part of working together collaboratively. In order to get there, these are the stages that we want to lead our students through: dependence to independence to interdependence. If we can get them from dependence to independence, we’re almost there. Interdependence comes with applying their hard-earned skills toward relationship building. How are we going to help our students to start thinking independently so that they may eventually use those skills in practicing interdependence?"


Via John Evans, Vicki Moro
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