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Measuring Learning in Blended Courses

Measuring Learning in Blended Courses | Teaching | Scoop.it

Assessment is an important part of any course. We want to make sure that our methods are working and learners are learning things (correctly!).

One of the things that I love about the blended and flipped classroom movements is the focus on assessment through projects, discussion, and other non-test means. Today I’m going to take a brief look at formal and informal assessments, in addition to some best practices for online quizzes.

Formal (Active, Authentic, Creative) Assessment

Formal assessment does not necessarily mean an exam. Instead, students may be asked to:

* create a portfolio piece (image, audio, lesson plan, the possibilities are endless!)
* write a research paper
* design a web site or visual resume
* research and present on a topic
* work with a client to solve a real problem
* tell a story through writing, audio, or video
* create a technical drawing or model
* design and build a prototype
* provide proof of application to their life/job


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Creative Teaching Starts With Empowerment - TeachThought

Creative Teaching Starts With Empowerment - TeachThought | Teaching | Scoop.it
New teachers vow to do things differently.  They declare that their classroom will be shining beacons of creativity, joy, and engagement. And then something happens.  They step into the system and the system forces them to change too. The light goes out and the cycle is perpetuated.

But for all those teachers where the light goes out, there are a few who remain symbols of hope.  These are the teachers who despite their circumstances in a broken system, somehow remain to connect with students on a human level, and draw out what is best in their students.  These are the teachers who encourage students to pursue their interests and seem to intuitively know different creative strategies to unlock learning in different types of children. These are the teachers students remember 40 years later, when being asked in an interview, “Who influenced you?”  The question becomes, what makes these teacher different? How do they remain steadfast and unshaken while the education system around them seems to spin in insanity?

The difference is empowerment.

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Cloud Education: The Future of Learning, The Forum - BBC World Service

Cloud Education: The Future of Learning, The Forum - BBC World Service | Teaching | Scoop.it

What are the big challenges in education around the World? How do we ensure everyone learns to the best of their ability? Is new technology the answer? And what does it mean for teachers and pupils?


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Wendy Zaruba's curator insight, May 20, 2015 3:11 PM

Cloud Education, what does it mean for teachers and pupils?  Will this be the future?

CHRISTINE OWEN's curator insight, May 22, 2015 9:29 PM

New technology must be accompanied by new pedagogies for new learning to take place. We are really only guessing at what the future holds for our students. In previous and even recent ages, we had a pattern of development to base our predictions upon. Now,the impossible is very likely, and the possible will be something else entirely tomorrow. We must ensure our students have the capacity to be adaptable and creative in their thinking to take advantage of and flourish in our world of ever improving technology and access.

Antonio Bautista's curator insight, May 24, 2015 12:33 PM

Buena Información Sobre las Alternativas de futuro

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4 Strategies To Recharge Your Teaching - TeachThought

4 Strategies To Recharge Your Teaching - TeachThought | Teaching | Scoop.it
The last month of teaching was quite hard for me.

I found myself becoming increasingly frustrated in the classroom, less tolerant, less friendly, and worst of all, sarcastic. As a result, I became utterly exhausted. Something needed to change. I needed to take a step back and reflect on what was happening. Why had things changed? Where had the love gone?

Had the students changed, or was it me? It was of course me. And it all came down to planning. My lessons were boring, and so students were naturally disconnected more often. Their attention waned easily, and inevitably, their behavior deteriorated. As I looked back over my planning, I saw a lot of attention given to addressing outcomes, but a distinct lack of focus on deep learning.

I decided to invest some time into designing a new lesson plan template, forcing me to explicitly incorporate into my planning elements that I know work, which engage students, and satisfy epistemology inherent in me, which is reflected in the image above. Each lesson must incorporate several strategies that I’ve used to recharge my teaching:

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How to learn with zero effort

How to learn with zero effort | Teaching | Scoop.it
What is the easiest way to learn? David Robson meets a group of scientists and memory champions competing to find techniques that make facts stick... fast.

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Rosemary Tyrrell, Ed.D.'s curator insight, May 3, 2015 8:12 PM

Interesting article from the BBC. 

Ivo Nový's curator insight, May 4, 2015 10:19 AM

Impressive tactics and strategies that can rapidly increase your memory potential.

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Microsoft Office 365 opettajille

Microsoft Office 365 Perusteita opettajille Huhtikuu 2015 Matleena Laakso Blogi: www.matleenalaakso.fi Twitter: @matleenalaakso Diat: www.slideshare.net/Matlee…;

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8 Strategies To Help Students Ask Great Questions

8 Strategies To Help Students Ask Great Questions | Teaching | Scoop.it

"Questions can be extraordinary learning tools.

A good question can open minds, shift paradigms, and force the uncomfortable but transformational cognitive dissonance that can help create thinkers. In education, we tend to value a student’s ability to answer our questions. But what might be more important is their ability to ask their own great questions–and more critically, their willingness to do so."


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, April 15, 2015 11:05 PM

How do you teach your learners to ask good questions? This post shares many resources to help you learn new skills that will assist you in teaching others.

The post begins with a visual, the Teach Thought Learning Taxonomy, which is a template for critical thinking that looks at cognition across six categories. This is described in depth.

Additional tools shared include:

* Socratic Discussion which includes a video from Tch (the Teaching Channel)

* Paideia Seminar - "an integrated literacy event built around formal whole class dialogue. The purpose for doing Paideia Seminar is to support students’ ability to think conceptually and communicate collaboratively." There is also a video.

* The Question Game (which was shared previously on this Scoop.it)

* Bloom's Taxonomy

* Question Formation Technique - See the visual at the top, or check out their website at The Right Question Institute. If this is of interest to you they are presenting a workshop in Boston in July. Information on this is available at their website.

* Universal Question Stems and Basic Question Stem Examples

This is actually part 2 of a two part post. The first post is A Guide to Questioning in the Classroom.

Mike Clare's curator insight, April 16, 2015 5:16 PM

Great starting point.  

K.I.R.M. God is Business " From Day One"'s curator insight, April 17, 2015 7:31 AM

SOME TIMES KNOWING THE RIGHT QUESTION TO ASK WILL GET THE RIGHT ANSWER FOR THE PROBLEM YOU ARE TRYING TO SOLVE!!  IF YOU DON'T KNOW WHAT TO ASK YOU MAY NOT GET THE RIGHT ANSWER FOR YEARS BUT THE ANSWER TO THE QUESTION THAT WAS ASKED!?!

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The Science (and Practice) of Creativity

The Science (and Practice) of Creativity | Teaching | Scoop.it
"Creativity isn't about music and art; it is an attitude to life, one that everybody needs," wrote the University of Winchester's Professor Guy Claxton in the lead-up to the 2014 World Innovation Summit for Education (WISE) dedicated to creativity and education. "It is a composite of habits of mind which include curiosity, skepticism, imagination, determination, craftsmanship, collaboration, and self-evaluation."

Sounds like the perfect skill set for equipping young people to navigate an increasingly complex and unpredictable world. Encouragingly, there's plenty of evidence -- from both research and practice -- that most of the above can be taught in the classroom. In fact, innovation and education experts agree that creativity can fit perfectly into any learning system.

But before it can be incorporated broadly in curriculum, it must first be understood.


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Creativity



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Ann-Lois Edström's insight:

Understanding the creative process and creating a creative atmosphere conducive to learning is crucial

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SMARTERTEACHER's curator insight, March 30, 2015 12:14 PM

Creativity must be cultivated in our schools.

Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, March 30, 2015 9:48 PM

Creativity fosters teaching and learning.

 

@ivon_ehd1

Dr. Deborah Brennan's curator insight, March 31, 2015 6:02 PM

Creativity has always been what has set America apart from other nations.  The ability of our population to imagine new solutions to everyday problems and create innovations has kept America as a world leader and given us the economic advantage.  many nations have looked at our education system and wondered how they could nurture this ability in their children.  As a gifted educator, teaching creativity has always been our focus.  Unfortunately, in these days of standardized testing, which lead to standardized curriculum and schools, we are losing our creative advantage.  Creativity is a key for ALL our children.  our children enter school with an active imagination and a natural ability for creative thinking.  We must understand creativity and how we can nurture it in our classrooms and schools. 

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The Flipped Learning Process Visually Explained

The Flipped Learning Process Visually Explained | Teaching | Scoop.it

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The shocking differences in basic body language around the world

The shocking differences in basic body language around the world | Teaching | Scoop.it
The body speaks volumes. But what it says depends on the culture you're in.

 

Tags: culture, infographic, worldwide.


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Gaëlle Solal's curator insight, April 1, 2015 12:58 PM

ça vous en bouche un coin?!

 

Payton Sidney Dinwiddie 's curator insight, April 14, 2015 6:00 PM

This shows the costums that several other Countries use in north America we cross our legs but in Countries Like Asia disrespectful. In America we view blowing or Noise is normal in Japan that Considered rude

Roman M's curator insight, April 16, 2015 12:17 PM

This article shows the different customs on gestures or body language in the world. What we might do is disrespectful in another country. For example, even some as simple as crossing your legs while sitting is common in North America and some European countries. However, it is viewed disrespectful in Asia and the Middle East.

RM

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How do You Choose Good Online Sources? (Infographic)

How do You Choose Good Online Sources? (Infographic) | Teaching | Scoop.it
Students often ask how to determine which websites and articles are good sources to cite. My answer is always, "Well, what do you think?" Students need to be able to think on their own. So, if your...

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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, March 25, 2015 10:21 PM

There are good ideas. What I find interesting, is I know some Internet sources i.e. blogs that are followed extensively and are written by people who spent little time in the classroom and no nothing about teaching.

 

@ivon_ehd1

Joyce Valenza's curator insight, March 26, 2015 12:05 PM

Mia MacMeekin's useful poster for student assessment of credibility

Sally Tilley's curator insight, March 26, 2015 6:13 PM

We need to continually reinforce these skills for our students to master this, thanks for sharing

 

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10 critical security habits you should be doing (but aren't) | CyberSecurity | Digital CitizenShip | ICT

10 critical security habits you should be doing (but aren't) | CyberSecurity | Digital CitizenShip | ICT | Teaching | Scoop.it
Staying safe these digital days takes more than antivirus. Here are 10 fundamental things you do to protect your PC and other devices.

 

Learn more:

 

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/03/29/practice-learning-to-learn/

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/01/28/practice-learning-to-learn-example-2/

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/10/03/design-the-learning-of-your-learners-students-ideas/

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/07/10/education-collaboration-and-coaching-the-future/

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2012/11/29/cyber-hygiene-ict-hygiene-for-population-education-and-business/

 


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The Opportunities For Creativity In Your Teaching

The Opportunities For Creativity In Your Teaching | Teaching | Scoop.it
The Opportunities For Creativity In Your Teaching
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Why People With Multicultural Experience Are More Creative

Why People With Multicultural Experience Are More Creative | Teaching | Scoop.it
A person who has immersed themselves in another culture has the openness and cognitive flexibility to make your organization more creative.

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Claude Emond's curator insight, March 8, 2015 9:10 AM

Creativity goes hand-in-hand with openness to what and who is around us, as well as with welcoming and understanding diversity.

Terry Doherty's curator insight, March 8, 2015 7:45 PM

Another way of showing how reading widely does more than just "broaden your world."


"When you dive into a second culture, two interesting things happen. First, it increases your overall openness to new experiences ... As second thing that happens is that you being to recognize that everything in the world can be viewed in many different ways." 

Susanna Soderstrom's curator insight, March 9, 2015 10:50 AM

Obvious to some not to others

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Blended and Online Assessment Taxonomy Infographic - e-Learning Infographics

Blended and Online Assessment Taxonomy Infographic - e-Learning Infographics | Teaching | Scoop.it
The Blended and Online Assessment Taxonomy Infographic presents types of activities and grading and feedback criteria to help you plan better assessments.

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Raquel Oliveira's curator insight, March 19, 2015 5:29 PM

Genial a utilização da taxonomia de Bloom nesse infografico das possiveis atividades em formato "blended"(mix presencial e on line)

Dr. Melissa A. Bordogna's curator insight, March 26, 2015 1:59 AM

At a glance, I thought this a helpful infographic.  It also made me think of the types of feedback I give my students.  In addtion to using a rubric (marking criteria), I tend to provide a fair bit of written feedback.  

How about you...Which types of feedback have you found to be very effective in terms of student learning (as oppose to time-saving for us)?

Karen Ellis's curator insight, April 1, 2015 6:57 PM

Designing and planning assesment in online learning is very important.  This infographic reminds us of the importance of making the task student centric and that  ongoing feedback is critical. 

 

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Principles of Effective Teaching

Principles of Effective Teaching | Teaching | Scoop.it
Pinnacle's principles of effective teaching are grounded in research into practices that have the largest impact on student learning. Yet, they are practical and written in plain English.
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Mary Martínez's curator insight, February 6, 2016 4:33 AM
Pinnacle's principles of effective teaching are grounded in research into practices that have the largest impact on student learning. Yet, they are practical and written in plain English.


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Great+Teachers


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Rise+of+the+Professional+Educator


Kathy Lynch's curator insight, November 11, 2016 11:55 PM
Thanks Inez Bieler! The graphic at the end listing Evidence-based Principles of Effective teaching: 1. Care about helping your students learn, 2. understand but do not excuse, 3. be clear about learning goals, 4. surface knowledge + deep understanding, 5. release responsibility, 6. give good feedback, 7. have students learn from each other, 8 manage behavior, 9. evaluate your impact, 10. always be learning ways to increase your impact. makes a good bookmark reminder. Self-assessment regularly would likely improve teaching more than many hours of random PD.
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Use PBL to Inspire Passion and Teach Lifelong Learning

Use PBL to Inspire Passion and Teach Lifelong Learning | Teaching | Scoop.it
Along with teaching students the required content, PBL teaches them skills such as critical thinking, collaboration, and accountability, self-regulation, and reflection.

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Blended and Flipped: Exploring New Models for Effective Teaching & Learning


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NathalieNoelYouinou's curator insight, May 5, 2015 3:46 AM

Rob Kelly's ideas are particularly interesting...

NathalieNoelYouinou's curator insight, May 5, 2015 3:48 AM

To understand the differences between #blended and #flipped 

#teaching and #learning

Karen Molineaux's curator insight, January 11, 2016 6:23 PM

Faculty Focus: Special Reports always has good strategies for  instructional pedagogy.

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How to Use OneNote at School: 10 Tips for Students & Teachers

How to Use OneNote at School: 10 Tips for Students & Teachers | Teaching | Scoop.it
It makes it easier to think during class—and I'm doing less busy work. Stephanie is just one of the 950 students at Sammamish High School in Seattle who have taken wholeheartedly to Microsoft OneNote along with their teachers. Across the country in Ohio, teachers gave their students "blizzard bags" when schools got closed for bad weather. These…

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rodrick rajive lal's curator insight, April 22, 2015 1:08 AM

Oh gosh, not another word processing software, but then no, I guess, One note is more versatile and it is free too! In times when the concept of BYOD has been in place and when the device has to be small enough, then it makes sense to use an IPad or a tab. One note works quite well on tabs so it makes sense to use it more regularly.

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3 Ways of Getting Student Feedback to Improve Your Teaching

3 Ways of Getting Student Feedback to Improve Your Teaching | Teaching | Scoop.it
Why You Must Reflect and Improve
Students are what we do. They are the center of our classroom, not us. However, as a teacher, I am the most impactful single person in the classroom. Honest feedback from our students will help me level up.

I've been doing this for more than ten years. Sometimes I laugh, sometimes I cry -- and sometimes I'm mortified. But I can honestly say that every single piece of feedback I've received has made me a better teacher. And great teachers are never afraid of having or inviting hard conversations. This is one of best practices that has helped me to be a better, more excited teacher every year.

 

Learn more:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/01/04/practice-better-ways-to-say-i-dont-know-in-the-classroom/

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/03/15/professional-development-why-educators-and-teachers-cant-catch-up-that-quickly-and-how-to-change-it/

 


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SMARTERTEACHER's curator insight, March 30, 2015 12:09 PM
Student Voice is invaluable to the effectiveness of the educator.
Dr. Deborah Brennan's curator insight, April 2, 2015 10:20 AM

i agree!  As a teacher, I always sought to improve and make my classroom more effective for students.  End of year surveys helped a lot.  I also had students write letters to next year's students.  This gave me insight into how the course and classroom activities helped or hampered their learning.  summer is a great -- there is actually time to reflect.  as lessons change, there is time to do researxh and gather resources.  

Lee Hall's curator insight, April 7, 2015 2:33 PM

It can be tough to hear others criticism  of us and our work, but it can help you improve. 

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4 Ways Technology Can Help Empower Teachers And Students

4 Ways Technology Can Help Empower Teachers And Students | Teaching | Scoop.it
Ed tech should be a means, not an end, to improving our education system.

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Sir Ken Robinson – Learning {Re}imagined (video)

Sir Ken Robinson – Learning {Re}imagined (video) | Teaching | Scoop.it
As a treat for the readers of this blog here is a longer and more complete interview with Sir Ken Robinson that was recorded as part of the Learning {Re}imagined book where he discusses educational technology, creativity, assessment and the future of learning (15 minutes).   There are more exclusive videos contained within the book…

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Lisa Gorman's curator insight, March 26, 2015 7:02 PM

I have a great admiration for the thinking of Sir Ken Robinson... He speaks so eloquently and argues for creative learning...and so much more...

 

A stand out quote for me from this interview;

 

"What tends to dull the appetite [for learning] is being force fed things that people can't see an immediately relevance in or don't have an immediate interest in it...or where they are forced to learn in situations where they are inimitable... you know, 8 hours a day, sit still, do as you're told."

 

Bring on different ways of engaging with people around learning so that they not only 'get it' but they really enjoy it and become life long learners.

 

I recommend this 15 minute video to you!

María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, March 27, 2015 2:03 PM
Creatividad ...Sir Ken Robinson – Learning {Re}imagined (video) | @scoopit via @AnaCristinaPrts http://sco.lt/...
The Future Shapers's curator insight, March 30, 2015 5:44 AM

Sir Ken Robinson on how we should be teaching our children if we want a future rich with creative and innovative leaders.

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Ten Disciplines of a Learner: Learning vs Mastery

Ten Disciplines of a Learner: Learning vs Mastery | Teaching | Scoop.it

Ten Disciplines of a Learner
We decided to continue the conversation on this topic at a faculty meeting. Several meetings later we had a new report card. We decided to give two grades and average them—one for “Learning,” the other for “Mastery.”

Sara might get an “F” in mastery and an “A” in learning, culminating in a “C” for the course. To be rigorous we picked ten observable behaviors and named them “Disciplines of a Learner:”

1.     Asks questions

2.     Builds on other people’s ideas

3.     Uses mistakes as learning opportunities

4.     Takes criticism constructively

5.     Speaks up

6.     Welcomes a challenge

7.     Takes risks

8.     Listens with an openness to change

9.     Perseveres in tasks

10.   Decides when to lead and when to follow.


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Criticism



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ManufacturingStories's curator insight, March 21, 2015 9:01 AM

Mastery versus Learning - Lots of thought provoking ideas here...

Nancy Jones's curator insight, March 21, 2015 9:57 AM

Love this examination of 'Disciplines of a Learner" that clearly distinguishes between master and learning. I think we should demonstrate greater value to the lifelong skill of learning .

Carv Wilson's curator insight, March 21, 2015 10:01 AM

Like the questions.

 

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Schools in Finland will no longer teach 'subjects' | EDUcation CHANGE | Teaching by Topic

Schools in Finland will no longer teach 'subjects' | EDUcation CHANGE | Teaching by Topic | Teaching | Scoop.it

For years, Finland has been the by-word for a successful education system, perched at the top of international league tables for literacy and numeracy.

.

Pasi Silander, the city’s development manager, explained: “What we need now is a different kind of education to prepare people for working life.

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“Young people use quite advanced computers. In the past the banks had lots of  bank clerks totting up figures but now that has totally changed.

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“We therefore have to make the changes in education that are necessary for industry and modern society.”

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Subject-specific lessons – an hour of history in the morning, an hour of geography in the afternoon – are already being phased out for 16-year-olds in the city’s upper schools. They are being replaced by what the Finns call “phenomenon” teaching – or teaching by topic. For instance, a teenager studying a vocational course might take “cafeteria services” lessons, which would include elements of maths, languages (to help serve foreign customers), writing skills and communication skills.

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More academic pupils would be taught cross-subject topics such as the European Union - which would merge elements of economics, history (of the countries involved), languages and geography.

.


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jmoreillon's curator insight, March 27, 2015 9:42 AM

This is what school librarians have been doing forever!

María Florencia Perrone's curator insight, April 8, 2015 4:00 PM

The world around us is not labelled or divided in categories, then why is academic content? Can we not relate topics and elaborate meaning on the basis of relationships and intertwined data? 

Dr. Helen Teague's curator insight, April 13, 2015 9:11 PM

I wonder if this would work in the U.S.? Also, in Finland, students do not take standardized tests until the end of high school (Zhao, 2012, p. 111), so thankfully, perhaps the drill and kill process is diminished.


*Zhao, Y. (2012). World Class Learners. 

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Ten Reflective Questions to Ask at the End of Class - Brilliant or Insane

Ten Reflective Questions to Ask at the End of Class - Brilliant or Insane | Teaching | Scoop.it
How deep is your commitment to reflective practice?

Do you maintain a reflective journal? Do you blog? Do you capture and archive your reflections in a different space?

Do you consistently reserve a bit of time for your own reflective work? Do you help the learners you serve do the same?

I began creating dedicated time and space for reflection toward the end of my classroom teaching career, and the practice has followed me through my work at the WNY Young Writer’s Studio. I’ve found that it can take very little time and yet, the return on our investment has always been significant.

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Ann-Lois Edström's insight:

Att reflektera över sin undervisning och hjälpa eleverna att också göra det. Jättebra frågor!

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Jarrod Johnson's curator insight, March 7, 2015 5:16 PM

Really good practice for your ePortfolio.

Darrington Lee's curator insight, March 7, 2015 9:36 PM

I feel that it is generally important to reflect on one self after taking a lesson, this ensures we are learning on the right track and doesn't "fall off" the topic. Reflection keep us calm and collected, so we can stand back straight up even after a failure to accomplish something. This gives us a never ending space to improve and beyond than just learning, but also to persevere, take responsibility in one's learning and also to excel in things we do.

Sue Alexander's curator insight, March 9, 2015 1:54 PM

Reflection...don't leave class without it!