Teaching Addition
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Mental Math Addition Strategies - Teaching in the Early Years

Mental Math Addition Strategies - Teaching in the Early Years | Teaching Addition | Scoop.it
Heather Wehrle's insight:

This website is an excellent source of both strategies and activities to help young students who are learning to add.  It details many different strategies, many of which I have seen in practice in my own classroom.  I have seen the impact that studying doubles, doubles plus one, and making ten have had on the fluency of my students.  They quickly recognize these facts and have committed them to memory.  In addition to sharing strategies, the author also links us to lesson plans and activities from "teachers pay teachers" that provide examples of how to teach these stategies.  Stategy instruction in mathematics is really important to students who are just learning how to add.  It helps them grasp a relatively abstract concept.  In my future classroom, I want to be able to provide my students with the tools they need to succeed.  While I want them to investigate math in their own way at first, I want to eventually explicitly teach these different strategies so that my students are fully equipped to tackle any math problem they face in the future.

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Mystery Math Museum

Mystery Math Museum | Teaching Addition | Scoop.it
Mystery Math Museum is an incredibly entertaining and challenging educational app that will have kids begging to practice their math skills using this app.
Heather Wehrle's insight:

I believe that utilizing 21st century applications like this one is a great way to enhance students' learning.  This game provides students with individual choices that allow them to cater the learning to their level, such as what operation to work on and how big the numbers will be.  It also makes the problems more open-ended in that it does not give the students two addends and ask for an answer; rather it gives the sum and asks for the two addends.  I have seen in my classroom that this is a much harder addition concept to grasp for many of my students, as it is a bit more abstract.  I believe that this app, and others like it, should be utilized more often as fun and engaging ways for students to practice their addition skills at their own level and pace.

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Tips to make math more enjoyable for young learners - Toronto Star

Tips to make math more enjoyable for young learners - Toronto Star | Teaching Addition | Scoop.it
Toronto Star
Tips to make math more enjoyable for young learners
Toronto Star
Never, ever say “I'm not good at math” — not even in sympathy when you see children struggling to figure out a problem.
Heather Wehrle's insight:

I appreciate this article for two things in particular that it states.  First, it stresses that making mistakes is an important part of the learning process.  Much of the learning that occurs in our lifetimes comes from making mistakes and learning from them.  The same is true in math.  It is important for students to be willing to try and not fear making a mistake.  We need to create a classroom environment and disposition in our children that learning is messy and we do not always get things right the first time.  It also mentions that we need to let students try to do math problems their own way.  We all think differently and develop different strategies for approaching problems.  Every student needs an opportunity to develop number sense by reasoning through math problems in their own way.  

 

When it comes to addition, we need to be fostering these strategies in our students.  There are many different ways to approach addition and there are many ways to check if your answers are correct.  We need to be developing a community of learners who work together to try new ideas and test their own reasoning.  Instead of giving the answer and having students practice, we should be giving them time to explore addition and make sense of it in their own way.  This will make the knowledge more meaningful and long-lasting.

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101206mathstrat.pdf

Heather Wehrle's insight:

This presentation reflects many of the prominent ideas from my math education classes thus far in college.  I believe that it is noteworthy that the number one math strategy mentioned for helping struggling students is integrated and connected problems.  As teachers, it is easy to create problems without taking notice of the context.  However, we rob students of the ability to make connections to their lives and see how math permeates in all areas of our lives.  It is also more engaging and memorable for students when they can attach new knowledge to prior knowledge and experiences.  We can help them achieve this by giving them math problems that have a relevant context and can be connected to other experiences.

 

The presenter also talks about the many different mediums that can be used to express math to students.  Using technology and software programs as well as manipulatives can address the needs of many different types of learners.

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math+helper.jpg (1200x1600 pixels)

math+helper.jpg (1200x1600 pixels) | Teaching Addition | Scoop.it
Heather Wehrle's insight:

This poster resembles one that has been posted in our classroom since one of the first weeks of school.  If we want our students to be successful at addition, we need to help them learn and understand the tools that can help them develop their knowledge.  In our classroom, we worked on one strategy at a time, teaching our students how it is useful in addition as well as how to apply it to actual problems.  On certain days, we would have them practice addition problems using a specific strategy.  On other days, we told them that they could use whichever strategy that they wanted to.  We always made sure to explain to the students that once they knew how to use each of the strategies, they would get to pick the ones that work best for them.

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Top 10 reasons why serious #games are a great addition to your #learning | #elearning #gamification

Top 10 reasons why serious #games are a great addition to your #learning | #elearning #gamification | Teaching Addition | Scoop.it
1. They are engaging

This is probably the most common argument you might hear if you are looking
into Serious Games. Everyone in the industry screams this out of the top of
their lungs, but that’s because it’s true.

Via JoelleYalin
Heather Wehrle's insight:

When I began student teaching, I was amazed by the amount of games my mentor teacher had the students playing in math.  Although it is difficult to remember what first-grade was like for me, I know that my schooling as a whole did not incorporate so many games into everyday curriculum.  Games were reserved for "Fun Fridays" or days when we had behaved well and were receiving a reward.  This article, however, promotes a much different story of why games should be used in the classroom.  While this article is not speaking directly to the learning occurring in an elementary school classroom, it shows us that games are an important part of learning throughout our lives.  Integrating them into the school day is an excellent way to engage students and let them take control over their own learning.  It provides a safe place to make mistakes and learn from them.  It also allows students to collaborate and become part of each other's learning.

 

I think that addition provides an excellent opportunity to include games in learning.  They supplement other instruction very well and grasp the attention of the students, especially in first-grade.  They also can take place in real-world contexts and show the students how math exists in their everyday lives.  When working with a group of struggling students in my placement classroom on the topic of addition, I utilized many different types of games and activities.  These presented the information to them in different ways and scaffolded their knowledge of addition.  They were also able to help each other make connections and develop their skills.  Over the course of a semester of work with them, I saw incredible improvements in their ability to add both efficiently and accurately.

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In Teaching Algebra, the Not-So-Secret Way to Students' Hearts - MindShift (blog)

In Teaching Algebra, the Not-So-Secret Way to Students' Hearts - MindShift (blog) | Teaching Addition | Scoop.it
In Teaching Algebra, the Not-So-Secret Way to Students' Hearts MindShift (blog) “When I started spending time in classrooms I realized the math wasn't being applied to the students' world in a meaningful way,” said Candace Walkington, assistant...
Heather Wehrle's insight:

Time and time again, I am asked by students, "when will we ever need to know this?"  I was one of those students as well, completely convinced that math had no place in my life except in school.  I think that this article addresses this point in a very impactful way.  We need to meet students where they are at individually and show them how the math applies to their lives.  Each student is unique and has different strengths and interests.  If we can relate their learning to those interests, they are much more likely to enjoy learning and therefore succeed.  

 

I am hoping that in my classroom, I am able to develop math problems and activities that engage my students and illustrate the real-world uses for math.  So far, I have been successful at relating addition and subtraction back to my students' lives through the topics of sharing, food, and wildlife.  I have also left these problems open-ended so that the students had choice and were able to take ownership over their work.

 

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Differentiating in Math Using Computer Games

Differentiating in Math Using Computer Games | Teaching Addition | Scoop.it

Technology can be a key component in teaching Math to young students. See how using computer games and different technology when teaching addition and subtraction can be effective. Covers Common Core State Standards for Math.


Via Darren Burris
Heather Wehrle's insight:

This video provides excellent ideas for how to meet the needs of many different levels of students in one classroom.  The teacher uses technology to meet the varying needs of students in his class.  I agree with his assertion that using computers helps students work at their own pace.  The programs that he states in the video allow students to move forward based on their performance.  The computer can give the students immediate feedback.  I believe that the instant feedback also assists students in self-monitoring.  They are instantly being able to see that they were incorrect in their thinking and can ask their teacher for help adjusting their thought-process to get the math correct.  They can then practice more problems that allow them to expand on their knowledge.

 

Having online resources that are fun for students also encourages them to practice their math outside of school.  With internet access, students will be able to visit these gaming sites outside of the classroom and build upon their knowledge.  Giving students resources to help them learn in and out of the classroom is important.  The games are engaging and fun, encouraging students to participate in them.  They also show real-world situations in which math would be used which helps students see the uses of math outside of school.

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Madeline Morgan's curator insight, December 12, 2013 10:44 PM

 A great video (thanks to Heather) that explains how and why technology should and can be used in order to teach addition. In my future classroom if there were enough computer for my students to do this I think using technology to help teach math is an excellent tool. In the video it explains how this teacher in particular really likes the math games that the students play on the computer because they are addition games that test their knowledge and the games give the students immediate feedback. I think this is great because like the teacher stated in the video while those students get feedback from playing the games, he can be meeting with a small group of students who need his support. I also think this is an excellent tool to use when teaching addition because by using technology students are not held down by it. For example, if a student is moving at a faster pace then others in his or her class, they can do harder math games. Using technology allows students to move at their own pace without affecting other stundents. I also thought that in this video another great point was explained when it comes to having students use techonolgy in the math classroom. Just because the students are using the computer does not mean they are not allowed to write the problems down or use other manipulatives in order to solve the problems. The technology should be used as an additional tool in order to teach math. Manipulatives and other strategies should be used along with the technology in order for students to continue practicing these things. Using these online addition games are a great way to keep students interested and always trying to move up or get to the next level. The games are constantly assessing the students on what they understand about the certain topic they are working on. I also love the idea of technology because it can be used for any topic, it does not have to be just used for just addition.