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The Geography of Small Talk

The Geography of Small Talk | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Surprising alternatives to "so what do you do?"—from New Orleans to New York.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 23, 2014 7:48 PM

The types of questions that you ask when you are meeting someone new for the first time has some regional variations but there is much more to the geography of small talk than that as see in this 4 minute video.  People want to understand your cultural, ethnic, socioeconomic context by asking spatial questions about where you are from.  Identity and place are tightly woven and these neighborhood questions are almost invitations to share much more personal information, as if to ask, "how do you fit in this world?"  When you are being introduced to someone, what are the questions that you ask, and what type of information are you hoping to get?  Each person has their own little geography that has profoundly shaped who they are---so what’s your story? 


Tags: language, regions, folk cultures, communityplace, neighborhood.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 24, 2014 9:43 AM

unit 2-3

Mr Steven Newman's curator insight, April 24, 2014 2:33 PM
Love this scoop from Seth Dixon. A nice way to help kids understand sense of place .
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Nine Cities That Love Their Trees

Nine Cities That Love Their Trees | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
More and more American cities are working to preserve their trees. Here’s a look at nine cities working to conserve their tree canopies.

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Greg Russak's comment, April 29, 2014 8:33 PM
In "hops", you say?!? HA!! We, the progeny of mill-hunks (a term of endearment referring steel workers) accept your challenge to a beer drinking.......oh......wait......did you mean hoops? Well, in that case, good sir, yes, your NBA team should have no trouble rolling all over our non-existent NBA franchise!! Shall we talk football, hockey, or even baseball?!? And, start planting more trees!!! ;-)
Party Recon's comment, April 29, 2014 9:10 PM
Challenged accepted! Our best Micro against IC Light. OK?
Greg Russak's comment, April 29, 2014 9:24 PM
IC Light?!? Bleh! I'll have what you're having!
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Why It Matters That National Geographic Just Ceded Crimea to Vladimir Putin

Why It Matters That National Geographic Just Ceded Crimea to Vladimir Putin | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
After word came down this week that the Crimean parliament had officially voted to secede from Ukraine and join Russia, Western governments immediately condemned the move. But one influential institution broke ranks to recognize the peninsula’s new political status: National Geographic. Not two days after the vote, the magazine’s editors...

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25 Most Scariest Places on Earth

25 Most Scariest Places on Earth | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 18, 2014 9:54 AM

Some of these are shrouded in mystery, haunted stories or strange geologic formations.  Many of these would be a great place to visit; others I would avoid at all costs.  Which ones would you like to go to?

Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, April 22, 2014 4:17 PM

Death zone, Mt. Everest, Nepal: 13 people died hear recently

Death zone, Mt. Everest, Nepal

See More : http://news-hound.co/25-most-scariest-places-on-earth/Death zone, Mt. Everest, Nepal

See More : http://news-hound.co/25-most-scariest-places-on-earth/
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Globalization and the Textile Industry

"On the 100th anniversary of the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire, little has changed in the global sweatshop economy. Workers are again trapped and burned to death behind locked exit gates."


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Danielle Bellefeuille's curator insight, May 10, 2014 6:16 PM

The sad reality of the new division of labor, we are moving backwards instead of forwards with labor policies and widening the gap between core and periphery countries. We need to stand up and advocate for fair trade. These countries rely on us for sources of unemployment, and we need to give them better wages, safer working conditions, and help them push pass this dependency, and grow into more economically and socially strong countries.

 

http://www.laborrights.org

Michael Mazo's curator insight, December 10, 2014 8:03 PM

The triangle shirtwaist factory in New York was a revolutionary turning point in labor regulations. Following this unfortunate event there had been many rules and laws that took effect in order to help the working people in factories and other harmful work places. The textile industry had been such an impact on globalization because this product had been so greatly treasured that countries all around the world were getting their fair share of producing a good that was in such high demand and through the use of globalization transport created an higher demand for textiles. Although, the boom of the textile industry came with the sacrifice of innocent civilians who worked endlessly just to feed their family. Regulations and legislation have to be put into effect to protect our people and our economy. 

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:17 AM

One of the first industries to be impacted by what is today called globalization was the textile industry and the successive waves of globalization continue to alter the geography of the textile industry.  This video shows how historical problems in the U.S. textile industry are seen today in countries such as Bangladesh, as does this interactive feature.  The following paragraph is from a Geography News Network podcast / article that Julie Dixon and I co-authored for Maps101 about the Bangladeshi garment industry:     


Many developing countries with the majority of their laborers working in agriculture welcome outsourced labor from the West. This is seen as a way to nurture industrialization, even if it is on the terms of trans-national corporations. Countless workers seek employment in textile factories simply because low pay is still an entry into the cash economy and it is one of the few jobs rural migrants can find when they first enter the big city. In such locations, Western labor, construction, and environmental standards are not priorities because the population’s basic needs haven’t been met, so the responsibility falls to the global companies—but their aim is to cut costs as much as possible to remain competitive.  From its emergence in textiles back in the late 1970’s, Bangladesh in 2013 made $19 billion in the export-oriented, ready-made garment industry, employing 4 million workers, most of whom are women. 


Listen to more of this Geography News Network podcast or read it here. 


Tags: Bangladesh, poverty, development, economic, globalization, industry, labor.

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The Science behind Google Earth

The Science behind Google Earth | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

"Google is using a new technology to automatically generate  3D buildings from 45-degree angle aerial photography made by overlapping passes of aircraft.  The aerial photos are combined to create 3D models."


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Annenkov's curator insight, April 16, 2014 12:46 AM

This technology of visualization I would name "3D landscape"

Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, April 16, 2014 8:40 PM

Tecnología para generar imágenes en 3D con Google Earth

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 2:06 PM

Google Earth has made the Earth easier to decipher and examine in a geographical sense of location and place by being able to see multiple layers. This article goes into the 3D designs and usage of aerial photography to create 3D images.

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The Next America

The Next America | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Demographic transformations are dramas in slow motion. America is in the midst of two right now. Our population is becoming majority non-white at the same time a record share is going gray.

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CB New Hire Onboarding's curator insight, April 25, 2014 9:35 AM

"The demographic shifts in the United States are transforming the cultural fabric of the country and this interactive feature from the Pew Research Center explores some of these changes.  Interracial marriage, declining fertility rates, migration, economic opportunities and politics are just some of the issues that can be seen in these excellent populations pyramids, charts, videos and graphs." - Seth Dixon 

Amanda Morgan's comment, September 18, 2014 10:46 AM
The demographic shifts will most definitely have an impact on politics and economic opportunities. With as many 85 year olds as 5 year olds, we will see an increase in the need for health care and general overall care for the elderly. There will be more need for social security and retirement plans. While it is a good thing overall that life expectancy is increasing, it may create other issues.
Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 2014 10:48 AM

The demographic shifts will most definitely have an impact on politics and economic opportunities. With as many 85 year olds as 5 year olds, we will see an increase in the need for health care and general overall care for the elderly. There will be more need for social security and retirement plans. While it is a good thing overall that life expectancy is increasing, it may create other issues.

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Using State Maps in School

Using State Maps in School | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

"Have you ever seen a map and marveled over all of the information that it contains? It is incredible how maps can capture so much of the real world and depict so many places. From big cities to small towns, maps use characteristics such as topography, hydrography, industry, and recreation to tell the story of a place."


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Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 2:03 PM

Using maps in school is a concern for many educators that know the value of map skills. This article romanticizes maps and the importance of maps and studying them.

Maps are important for location as they can show absolute location to relative location and help with mental maps.

miya harris's curator insight, August 21, 2014 10:10 AM

I think that it is very smart to show large scale maps in schools.Large scale maps can help students to understand their locations better because they can see them in greater detail.Roads,buildings,and water element become more clear.I think every school should have a large scale map to help students better under stand their town, county, or state.

Rachael Johns's curator insight, August 21, 2014 9:31 PM

This is a great idea because students will be able to learn more with the hands on action. Most students just write or copy down notes that they don't really pay attention to but with this the student is more likely to learn from it because they have to measure out where to put the location, name the place that they're plotting, and put the note beside it about why it's important. This will also help students learn the location of places better because they're the ones actually making the map.     ~ R.J ~

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WATCH: Yup, The English Language Is Insane

WATCH: Yup, The English Language Is Insane | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Seriously, what is with the English language? Why is the plural of box boxes, but the plural of ox oxen? It makes no sense, people!

ASAP Thought's poem "English is Crazy" helps us break down all the ways English is well, insane. Grammar...
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Aerial Photographs Catalogue the Life and Death of Volcanic Islands

Aerial Photographs Catalogue the Life and Death of Volcanic Islands | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

Volcanic islands can seem to appear out of nowhere, emerging from the ocean like breaching monsters of the deep. Below, Mika McKinnon explains how these odd geological formations are born, how they evolve, and how they eventually vanish back beneath the waves.


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Matthew Richmond's curator insight, December 2, 2015 3:30 PM

Re-scooped from Professor Dixon, pretty cool story on the formation of islands in the south Pacific. A couple of them look like the island visible from the beach in Rincon, Puerto Rico where I stayed. The island is one giant rock so nobody lives there and it's a naval base for the U.S. military. This, however, is a different situation when you realize that not only do people live here, but kind of a lot of people live here.

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 9:00 PM

What causes the death and the caldera in a volcano? One thing that happens in a deceased volcano is the center of the volcano starts to either erode or the inside finally caves in. Once this happen a caldera takes shape and the ocean starts to take over. As the waves eat away at the shores it will eventually create a island that is shaped like a "U". After this happens that island will someday retreat back into the ocean and someday form a barrier reef.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 10:52 PM

Based on general knowledge, I know that the taller a volcano is, the younger it is and the shorter it is, the older it is. The reason they start to get short is from erosion. Hot spots in the Earth's crust make small islands from molten rock. Young islands can be very dangerous, because if they are inhabited, they have the possibility of erupting, whereas an old island does not since the volcano is lnactice and eroding. Over time the inactive volcano will crumble and a caldera will take shape and after even more time, that caldera will slip under the ocean and become a reef. 

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Portraits of Reconciliation

Portraits of Reconciliation | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
20 years after the genocide in Rwanda, these perpetrators and survivors are standing for forgiveness.
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Two Dollar Bill Is Oddity, but Some Love the Tender

Two Dollar Bill Is Oddity, but Some Love the Tender | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
One billion are in circulation, but it has always lagged in popularity behind the $1 bill.
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Earthquakes in the Classroom

"An 8.2-magnitude earthquake struck off the coast of northern Chile, generating a local tsunami.  The USGS reported the earthquake was centered 95 km (59 miles) northwest of Iquique at a depth of 20.1km (12.5 miles).  This video gives the context for this type of earthquake."  


Via Seth Dixon
Ms. Harrington's insight:

http://www.iris.edu/hq/programs/education_and_outreach/resources

 

Lesson Plans from the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS)

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 2, 2014 11:09 AM

I woke up this morning to news of a large earthquake in Chile (security camera video footage).  IRIS (Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology) creates teaching resources for teachers who want to use the current events such as yesterday's earthquake in Chile as an opportunity to discuss earth's physical systems and how they impact humanity.  They've produces slides, animations and PDFs for classroom use all while you were sleeping last night.  


Tags: visualization, disasters, physical, Chile.

dilaycock's curator insight, April 3, 2014 2:02 AM

From Seth Dixon: 

 "IRIS(Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology) creates teaching resources for teachers who want to use the current events such as yesterday's earthquake in Chile as an opportunity to discuss earth's physical systems and how they impact humanity.  They've produces slides, animations and PDFs for classroom use all while you were sleeping last night."  

Geofreak's curator insight, April 3, 2014 1:37 PM

Hoe ontstond deze tsunami precies?

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Comparing Rhode Island's Size

Comparing Rhode Island's Size | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

"I recently received this incredible shirt (I think the Easter bunny must stalk my Facebook page…but the shirt is also available online here).  I loved the idea behind it; the T-shirt mingles big-state bravado that declares regional superiority, with small-state insecurity that begs not to be forgotten. Both sentiments, even if they are on opposite side of the spectrum, display an enormous sense of regional pride and communal identity."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 24, 2014 12:04 PM

My first thought was to check the truthfulness of this map and to see how many “Rhode Islands” there are in state Texas.  I used this clever website that shows the number of areal units equal to the size of Rhode Island that are in any given country. And despite what that southwest bravado may lead you to believe, Texas isn’t its own country. So I needed to find a different website which lets you overlay any two places one on top of the other. This is a fantastic resource for help leverage your students’ local knowledge to teach them about places that are more remote and where their mental maps might have very little data.   And never mess with the Ocean State…even if this is Texas’ version of Earth Day.

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Do You Live Within 50 Miles of a Nuclear Power Plant?

Do You Live Within 50 Miles of a Nuclear Power Plant? | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
A new interactive map tells you exactly how far you live from a nuclear reactor

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Google Maps Displays Crimean Border Differently In Russia, U.S.

Google Maps Displays Crimean Border Differently In Russia, U.S. | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
In Russia, Google Maps now shows the Crimean Peninsula as part of Russian territory. The service shows a different image on browsers in the U.S.

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Matt Black: The Geography of Poverty

Matt Black: The Geography of Poverty | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Mapping poverty and powerlessness through geotagged photographs.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 22, 2014 12:37 PM

This is a beautiful and somewhat haunting curation of poverty images that are all geotagged and index with the hashtag #geographyofpoverty.  The black and white photograph adds a great dimension to the stark images. 

Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, April 22, 2014 4:29 PM

Interesting photos all in California

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 18, 2014 11:42 AM

unit 6

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The World's Largest Trees

"The world's second-largest known tree, the President, in Sequoia National Park is photographed by National Geographic magazine photographer Michael 'Nick' Nichols for the December 2012 issue."


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Hemant Galviya's curator insight, April 17, 2014 2:55 AM

hiiiiiiiiiiii

Miroslav Sopko's curator insight, April 18, 2014 11:44 AM

Najväčšie stromy sveta.

Basant Kerketta's curator insight, April 21, 2014 4:26 AM

Magnificent !!!

These kind must be saved.

Wish I could plant and replicate this size and height here in my home town.

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The Town that is Literally Living Under a Rock

The Town that is Literally Living Under a Rock | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

"People choose to live in some pretty baffling places, like those towns sitting at the base of volcanos or the precariously placed monasteries in the Himalayan mountains. Here’s one that looks like it might have been hit by a meteor and residents just decided to carry on as usual…Welcome to the town of Setenil de las Bodegas in Spain, where around 3,000 inhabitants are living quite literally, under a rock."


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dilaycock's curator insight, April 8, 2014 6:38 PM

An extreme example of the built environment working with the natural one. I don't think, however, that I'd be able to sleep well with this very visible weight hanging over my head! 

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, April 16, 2014 5:56 PM

these places are so beautiful! We forget how beautiful the natural environment really is.

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Feeding 9 Billion

Feeding 9 Billion | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
When we think about threats to the environment, we tend to picture cars and smokestacks, not dinner. But the truth is, our need for food poses one of the biggest dangers to the planet.

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Will we be able to feed the entire population? How agriculture changes the landscape.

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Sally Egan's curator insight, April 30, 2014 11:09 PM

Agricultural production is one of the ways in which people modify the environment more than any other.  Global population is expected to top out at around 9 billion around 2050, so will we be able to sustainably feed all of the entire human population?  This one question brings up many more spatial, environmental, political and social questions--this interactive feature nicely addresses many of the pertinent issues in a very accessible manner.   

 

This article relates well to the Population topic in Global Challenges and issues that arise from the present growth patterns.  

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 1:59 PM

As population continues to grow and agricultural lands dissappear, the issue of feeding the world is becoming a growing concern.

The environmental places of the world are becoming arid and the agrarian places are dwindling affecting the human/environment interaction by introducing agricultural issues.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 2016 3:52 PM

Agricultural production is one of the ways in which people modify the environment more than any other.  Global population is expected to top out at around 9 billion around 2050, so will we be able to sustainably feed all of the entire human population?  This one question brings up many more spatial, environmental, political and social questions--this interactive feature nicely addresses many of the pertinent issues in a very accessible manner.    

 

Tags: sustainability, agriculture, food production, environment modify, unit 5 agriculture. 

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Largest glacier calving ever filmed

"On May 28, 2008, Adam LeWinter and Director Jeff Orlowski filmed a historic breakup at the Ilulissat Glacier in Western Greenland. The calving event lasted for 75 minutes and the glacier retreated a full mile across a calving face three miles wide. The height of the ice is about 3,000 feet, 300-400 feet above water and the rest below water."

 

Tags: physical, geomorphology, landforms, erosion, climate change, Greenland.


Via Seth Dixon
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More information at www.chasingice.com

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Flaviu Fesnic's comment, April 12, 2014 3:31 PM
impressive !
Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, April 13, 2014 2:15 PM

Adam LeWinter and Director Jeff Orlowski filmed a historic breakup at the Ilulissat Glacier in Western Greenland

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New York City's Disappearing Mom-and-Pop Storefronts

New York City's Disappearing Mom-and-Pop Storefronts | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
Two photographers set out to see what happened to small family businesses in New York City in a decade

Via Seth Dixon
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What a decade can do to a cultural landscape.

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Heidi Ames's curator insight, April 10, 2014 10:49 AM

Awesome to use when studying the Northeast and Immigration.  How scenes change in a short time due to economy!

L.Long's curator insight, April 15, 2014 6:55 PM

Changing nature of world cities

Jake Reardon's curator insight, April 21, 2014 5:49 PM

To be honest I am surprised that "Mom and Pop" storefronts lasted this long in New York City. It just seems to me that as a city grows and rent prices go up the smaller store fronts would naturally be pushed out by larger conglomerates who would be more suited to handle the rent prices. Of course it is an old addeage of capitalism that as long as you offer a good product that consumers would be inclined to consume you can stay above water in even the most competitive locations. Although to me that would appear to have its limits. Perhaps the economic tides of the present in New York are that limit.

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Soviet Bus Stops

Soviet Bus Stops | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it

"Photographer Christopher Herwig has covered more than 30,000 km by car, bike, bus and taxi in 13 countries discovering and documenting these unexpected treasures of modern art. From the shores of the Black Sea to the endless Kazakh steppe, the bus stops show the range of public art from the Soviet era and give a rare glimpse into the creative minds of the time."


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Jared Medeiros's curator insight, March 9, 2015 6:04 PM

A new way to observe and appreciate architecture and creativity from a different culture.  I love the idea of the book to show how something so ordinary and overlooked in everyday society like a bus stop can be turned into works of art.  It would be cool to see this inspire other artists to turn other modern day things into cool works of art.  How awesome would this have been 20 years ago if they did things like this to phone booths?

Louis Mazza's curator insight, April 21, 2015 1:18 PM

This article is a collage of soviet bustops, which happen to be extravagant. Some of them are ancient looking made out of cement. Some have highly decorated sculptures of the sickle and hammer soviet sign. Others are large sheltered areas to protect citizens. By looking at the high scale of bustops, and large amount, it shows that the population must use a lot of bus transport. Some of these bustop are very nice looking, elegant, unique, or a distinct representation of Russian History. It is unique to see a different spin on a Bustop, something that seems so repetitive at Kennedy Plaza here in Providence.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 4:55 PM

for as monstrous as the soviet union was, they did care about appearances and the safety of their people. these bus stops show some of the wonderful aspects of soviet architecture. in addition, you can see bus stops in the middle of nowhere. this is the same mindset that made the soviets build nuclear shelters for the majority of their populace.

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Supreme Court Strikes Down Limits On Campaign Spending – Big Sky, Big Money - FRONTLINE

Supreme Court Strikes Down Limits On Campaign Spending – Big Sky, Big Money - FRONTLINE | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
The ruling, which strikes down certain limits on individual campaign contributions, all but ensures a greater role for wealthy donors in American politics.
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What to do with all that post-White House free time?

What to do with all that post-White House free time? | Teachers Toolbox | Scoop.it
President George W. Bush's artwork left us pondering, what exactly do presidents do to fill their days when they leave the White House?
Ms. Harrington's insight:

What do Presidents do after the leave the White House?

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