Teachers slander and libel
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Rescooped by Ryan whalen from Libel and Slander Affects Both the Teachers and Students
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Former student sues Fla. district for libel over student newspaper photo - Student Press Law Center

Former student sues Fla. district for libel over student newspaper photo - Student Press Law Center | Teachers slander and libel | Scoop.it

This article is important for teachers because its shows how much you need to pay attention to things you say, write, or in this case illustrate. In most libel cases it deals with something that had been written. It is important to know libel can also deal with pictures and what they may imply. In this case a student’s reputation was ruined because of where his picture was places in proximity to a STD add. All teachers should pay attention to things like this in order to protect themselves from lawsuits.


Via Nola Smith
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Vikki Howard's comment, September 3, 2012 12:34 AM
this article does show that pictures too can be the pretext for libel--though in this case, it was the juxtaposition of the photo with the article on STDs--what is libel, and why would this student feel that he had a claim to defamation?
Bo Herak's comment, September 3, 2012 9:19 PM
In this case of a student sueing the Miami Dade School system because of a article with the students face in the school paper with the students face on it talking about STD's. This is important to slader and Libel in education because even though it is a student based paper, the school in my opinion should have a faculty member edit the paper so that nothing like this would ever happen. The school won the law suit but it is a good lesson learned and other schools should learn form this schools mistake.
Vikki Howard's comment, September 9, 2012 10:57 PM
On what basis did the school win the case? This is important because the student sued on the basis of a chance placement of article and photo--was there malicious intent? Did the student suffer actual damage to his reputation? Was the school liable for student content?
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Teacher Says She Wishes Her Students Dead; Judge Says She Can ...

Teacher Says She Wishes Her Students Dead; Judge Says She Can ... | Teachers slander and libel | Scoop.it

I believe this case is important to teachers because it shows how things on facebook and other sources of social media can get distorted and taken out of content. A teacher should never involve things from class or school on their social media sources. In cases of libel things can often be taken wrong and a teacher should always be careful when making personal comments on public sites. In this case the teacher was not found guilty but in many other cases teachers aren’t so lucky.


Via Nola Smith
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Vikki Howard's comment, February 25, 2012 3:11 PM
yes, I agree--unless a teacher makes a comment about a specific student, the principles of defamation do not come into play--yet teachers are being held to a very high bar (and should be) with respect to first amendment rights on the internet--
Vikki Howard's comment, September 3, 2012 1:10 AM
Teachers should not take comfort in this suit--it is but one of many cases where teachers have been suspended/fired subsequent to comments made on social media--what are the defamation issues in this case?
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Students Using the First Amendment to Slander ... - Topical Teaching

Students Using the First Amendment to Slander ... - Topical Teaching | Teachers slander and libel | Scoop.it

This case gives a good example when students can take advantage of their first amendment right. In most cases a teacher is protected against what happens with students, but when kids are out of the school they have many more rights. It is important that teachers do their best to stay away from facebook and myspace. It is unfortunate that students can do things like this but first amendment rights are important and students should have the right to express personal feelings outside of school.


Via Nola Smith
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Vikki Howard's comment, February 25, 2012 3:26 PM
you are right--today is not our mother's school environment -- our first amendment rights (which is already badly maligned) should be strongly defended--a long body of litigation against journalist's invading the privacy of public figures (i.e., entertainers) have emboldened the media--and now, students who malign their own public figures (i.e., teachers)
Vikki Howard's comment, September 3, 2012 1:02 AM
The courts are also big believers in the First Amendment--to date, leaning against any curtailment of freedom of expression in cases of cyber slander. It is clearly important for teachers to grow a thick skin, as violence against teachers/administrators (and everyone else) continues to pollute the net. However, schools are stepping in to punish students (legally and illegally) in an attempt to get a handle on activity that disrupts the school environment. In what ways are teachers less protected than other citizens?
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Student's defamation claim denied over 'prostitute' remark

Student's defamation claim denied over 'prostitute' remark | Teachers slander and libel | Scoop.it
Teacher's comment that 'You remind me of a prostitute chewing her gum' did not state an objective fact, California appeals court rules.

Via Erik Schwab
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Vikki Howard's comment, September 2, 2012 1:14 PM
I loved your analysis Erik-beginning with the genesis of defamatory law and application to this particular case in terms of principle of both "truth/falsehood" and directness of comment. In addition, your opinion that such a statement may not be slander, but is most certainly out of bounds for a teacher is a point well made. In addition to being in poor taste, could be seen as sexual harassment--for I suspect boys who blow bubbles would not be referred to as prostitutes.
Bo Herak's comment, September 3, 2012 9:13 PM
In this article a teacher made a indirect comment to a student about how her chewing her gum made reminded him of a prostitute and the student took it as if he called her a prostitute when all he wanted to do was make her stop chewing her gum The teacher got lucky here because he choose his words right and didn't directly call her a prostitute. This is a very important thing for teachers to know and to always be careful when making a comment directed towards a student because you never know how they will interpute what you say.
Vikki Howard's comment, September 9, 2012 11:02 PM
You are right, the courts have split hairs with respect to direct v implicit comments that might damage a person's reputation. There are other factors that make this case an "iffy" defamation suit--though I might have attacked this indelicate comment from a different angle--sexual harassment; when boys blow bubbles with their gum I would guess one does not think of a gender-based derrogatory remark.