Teacher vs Student Centered Classrooms
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Teacher Chucks Classroom Rules, Consequences

Teacher Chucks Classroom Rules, Consequences | Teacher vs Student Centered Classrooms | Scoop.it
Can a classroom manage itself?
Byron Marroquin's insight:

 I myself have often asked the question, "can a classroom manage itself?" And to me, the clear answer has always been no.  It was no when I was a student sitting in a classroom and I still believe it to be no as an aspiring educator.  This blog post is about a teacher with over 20 years in the field, who writes about his experience in the classroom while practicing different philosphies.  

This teacher wanted to discipline and punish his students for any type of misbehavoir or insubordination, so much, that he had built up quite a reputation amoung students became known as "one of those teachers."  He thought it was great but after years he started to realize that his methods were ineffective.  He noticed that he alienated his students.  The students became less engaged due to his militant tactics.  Instead, he know adapted to a "no-rules, no-consequences learning community" where students are less bored and more active with projects.  

This first thing that came to mind was the science classroom that I observe at the local middle school.  I question how credible his results are.  The author states, "when students are working collaboratively, using technology, leaving their seats and, yes, even chewing gum, they are more likely to complete activities and projects and less likely to be disruptive."  I have to disagree with that because it is not what I have observed.  In that science classroom, I have observed times where at least half of the class is not only not working on their project or activity, but is also being disruptive.  I think that having technology in the classroom only exacerbates the issue because it only provides more venues to not do an assignment.  

I would like to know more about the classroom demographics as well as the geographical region in which this school is located to give me a better idea of the audience in this instructors classroom.  Overall, I think being notorious for the "meanest" teacher in school, as the blog puts it, may not be the best route to go. There should be a balance between punishing every little deed and creating a welcoming classroom environment.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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10 Pros And Cons Of A Flipped Classroom

10 Pros And Cons Of A Flipped Classroom | Teacher vs Student Centered Classrooms | Scoop.it
10 Pros And Cons Of A Flipped Classroom
Byron Marroquin's insight:

"Flipped" classrooms move away from the traditional role of a teacher, where teachers lecture and the students are responsible for mastery of the material.  In this new teaching model, more attention is given to student understanding of the material;"essentially, the homework that is typically done at home is done in the classroom, while the lectures that are usually done in the classroom are viewed at home" (TeachThoughStaff, 2013).  The top two cons for this model is that it can create a digital divide (with students in low-income areas) and that it relies heavily on preperation and trust.  In other words, there is no way to ensure that students will keep up with the work that is required of them.  I think this would work with old, more mature students or with younger students with the aid of parents/guardians.  Overall, classrooms should encorporate a variety of teaching techniques so that every students has a chance to learn in their preferred learning style.

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Increasing Student Engagement By Grading Backwards

Increasing Student Engagement By Grading Backwards | Teacher vs Student Centered Classrooms | Scoop.it
Increasing Student Engagement By Grading Backwards
Byron Marroquin's insight:

A new perspective on grading: additive versus subtractive systems.  Traditionally, students learn on a subtrative grading system, which means that they are required to achive perfect scores, on a 100-point scale, for example.  The problem with this is that it stiffles creative and risk-taking types of thinking.  In this stystem, students are punished if they do not receive anything less than a perfect score.  Students will be more focused on getting a high score than on actually learning and engaging in the material in a meaningful way.

  The other, proposed system, takes a different approach; students earn points on an additive scale.  Similar to a score board for a video-game, students earn an accumilation of points for every correct answer.  This encourages students to figure out different solutions to problems.  Because it is additive, mastery of the material will occur over a preriod of time and students will not go on to the next objective until they have mastered the current.  This system increases students' feeling of success which could encourage them to continue on their path. 

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Effective Learning: Rigor, Engagement, Student-Centered Task

Effective Learning: Rigor, Engagement, Student-Centered Task | Teacher vs Student Centered Classrooms | Scoop.it
critical and creative thinking; · a student-centered task, that is clearly aligned with the objectives and a matching assessment that looks for evidence of learning from the task;; communication of learning;; collaboration (this ...

Via teachingtomtom, Byron Marroquin
Byron Marroquin's insight:

Creating student-centered tasks in the classroom allows for critical and creative thinking from students which can empower them and allow them to learn on their own. In this deeper-type of learning, students can connect the material they already know with their own ideas. Essentially, it helps studets learn how to think on a more independant type of level.

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Byron Marroquin's curator insight, December 2, 2013 5:48 PM

Creating student-centered tasks in the classroom allows for critical and creative thinking from students which can empower them and allow them to learn on their own.  In this deeper-type of learning, students can connect the material they already know with their own ideas.  Essentially, it helps studets learn how to think on a more independant type of level.

Ashli Meginnis's comment, December 8, 2013 1:47 PM
I liked this article. I too, agree that it is important for students to learn and discover things on their own. It allows for better memory of the subject material. It also makes them more independent.