Teacher Tools and Tips
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Tools, tips and practices to share with teachers
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Students Learn to Fail—and Recover—at Calif. School

Students Learn to Fail—and Recover—at Calif. School | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Educators at a Los Angeles-area high school believe teaching students to "fail productively" will equip them for success in the long run.
Sharrock's insight:

How do you track the changes you have made in yourself to promote problem solving behaviors in your students?

"Learning to Fail" is almost a cliche now, but do we really support learners in ways that they actually learn from failure?

In the article, it is shared that "students who were allowed to struggle with new problems on their own first were better at evaluating different variations of the problem and using different methods to solve it, and they showed deeper understanding of the underlying mathematical concepts. In observations of the classes, Mr. Kapur said teachers "consistently underestimated" students' ability to muddle through to answers on their own." Saying platitudes after a student doesn't succeed is not support. There are practices and systems that need to be in place.  What are those practices and systems?

Can teachers really change themselves to become the kinds of supporters students need so that they can learn through failure? What can you do to make those changes? What changes have you made so far? 

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Attribution Theory - Simply Psychology

How do we attach meaning to other's behavior, or our own?  This is called attribution theory. For example, is someone angry because they are bad-tempered or because something bad happened?

“Attribution theory deals with how the social perceiver uses information to arrive at causal explanations for events.  It examines what information is gathered and how it is combined to form a causal judgment” (Fiske & Taylor, 1991)

Sharrock's insight:

This theory was explored in Thinking Fast and Slow. Saying it is psychological transference seems to be inaccurate. In the book, it was introduced as the person's ability to attribute actions and intentions, even emotions, to objects. In the study shared, there was a large triangle, a two other smaller shapes. They were animated. children viewing the animation readily interpreted the large triangle as a bully that was bullying a smaller shape and that the other shape came to help defend against the bully. They were only shapes. They didn't even have faces. Kahneman also shared that this attribution did not occur with people with autism. 

 

This tendency to attribute intentions can create problems when dealing with using anecdotes as evidence and may be the cause of disagreements. I'm still reading Kahneman's book, but I do wonder how attribution theory and transferance are related as models.

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