Teacher Tools and Tips
3.1K views | +0 today
Follow
Teacher Tools and Tips
Tools, tips and practices to share with teachers
Curated by Sharrock
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

9 Tips on How to Be Honest With Someone Without Being Negative

9 Tips on How to Be Honest With Someone Without Being Negative | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Learn how to be honest about sensitive subjects without sounding too negative.

 

Here are 9 key tips on how to be honest with someone:

Look at the situation from their perspective before you do anything.

 

Ask yourself if this is something that really needs to be said. Are you telling them anything they don’t know or haven’t acknowledged?

 

Choose your words carefully – say it to yourself before you say it out-loud. How does it sound?

 

Don’t insult, blame, exaggerate, or be judgmental. Use a calm and respectful tone while describing the problem.

 

Do it in private. You don’t want the person to feel like they are being pressured by a bunch of people all at once.

 

Always offer a solution. Don’t just state a problem if you don’t have some good advice to go with it.

 

Admit you could be wrong. This is just your opinion, the person doesn’t have to agree with you.

 

Let it go if you notice the person is responding negatively toward it. Don’t persist if they aren’t interested in talking about it.

 

Go back to being a good friend again. Don’t make it awkward.
Sharrock's insight:

This might help students as well as teachers and administrators. Social skills need to be taught, sometimes explicitly. Might be useful for a number of different classrooms and social settings, including the speech therapist's space or office when trying to teach pragmatic language skills to students with ADHD/ADD, on the autism spectrum, or students with lagging skills in the language or social skills.

 

I love it when adults say something devastating and rationalize the disasterous response with "I was just being honest." And by love I mean I really really have no patience with such statements. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Internet Privacy and Social Networking Study

Internet Privacy and Social Networking Study | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Results of the Study

Not surprisingly, the AdLab found that communicating through social networking websites was second-nature to the study participants. However, while student were aware that the sites are inherently public, they were unaware of how public the information on these sites is and how that information can be used against them.

 

Through case studies and questionnaires, the researchers examined the students' use patterns and assessed their awareness of privacy and ethics online. The results reflect that while students regularly use the Internet in general, and social networking sites in particular, to find information about others online, many study participants had a "blind spot" in not fully realizing that the same type of a search could be performed about them.

 

The students in the study recognized that a person must take responsibility for his or her online profile, but insisted that it was wrong to judge that person by what he or she chose to post online.

 

In general, the study participants were only vaguely aware that people other than peers and classmates might be looking at their profiles. Instead, the students somewhat naïvely expected a degree of personal and professional separation online even if potential hiring managers, internship coordinators, or athletic coaches were viewing the materials online. In reality, the delineation between a person's "virtual" and "real" life appears to exist only for the college-aged participants. They appeared uncomfortable with the notion that few others make a similar distinction.

Sharrock's insight:

This is a resource that can help inform and support educators who are facilitating learning of privacy, Internet, and social networking safety.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

10 Journos You Don’t Want to Fight on Twitter - FishbowlDC

10 Journos You Don’t Want to Fight on Twitter - FishbowlDC | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
10 Journos You Don’t Want to Fight on Twitter
Sharrock's insight:

Something to support lesson of Internet/social networking use: manners, etiquette, impact, etc. Also useful to make it clear to high school students that adult professionals display behaviors on social networking just like teens.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Back to School: Protecting Your Child from Identity Theft | NakedLaw

Back to School: Protecting Your Child from Identity Theft | NakedLaw | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
As kids go back to school, parents need to know the signs that child identity theft happened, and how to prevent it.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

The darkside of social media | USA TODAY College

The darkside of social media | USA TODAY College | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Sharrock's insight:

It's amazing that college students don't recognize that that their profiles are searched just as they search the profiles of others. I wonder if it is a case that they find others more interesting than themselves, that no one would be interested enough. Or is it that anonymity effect of the Internet, that people can't face people so believe they are invisible.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

DMV gears up to adapt rules of road for driverless cars | Top Stories | FresnoBee.com

DMV gears up to adapt rules of road for driverless cars | Top Stories | FresnoBee.com | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
SACRAMENTO -- Google's self-driving car had already logged hundreds of thousands of miles on Bay Area roads before Gov.
Sharrock's insight:

Could be engaging talking about the problems with introducing a new technology to the public. Especially in this situation where so many lives can be impacted. What if school buses became autonomous? What if an autonomous truck crashes in a school zone? This discussion could be focused within the boundaries of this article--safety, regulation, licensing, innovation.

 

The complexities are getting interesting. I didn't think about rain and snow driving. I wonder how these cars will perform. Since Google is involved, I just assumed that privacy was out the window, especially considering the use of Google Maps and Google Now in logging one's location. I like the questions about minors being allowed/licensed to "drive". What is that going to even mean now when the car is driving itself? 

 

"The process is just getting started, but signs of tension have already emerged between state regulators and carmakers who want wide latitude to test their inventions on California roads."


Read more here: http://www.fresnobee.com/2013/05/27/3316499/dmv-gears-up-to-adapt-rules-of.html?sf13291628=1&sf13546551=1#storylink=cpy
more...
No comment yet.